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mm 



VOL. LI. 



CHICAGO, MAY, 1918 



Number 1 




0m onlp gafeguarb amtb tfje JSabel 
of opinions arounb us; te a fuller anb 
more accurate fenotolebge of J^olp 
Scripture. 53)te alone toill enable u* 
to btetingutef), in teaching neto to u#, 
tfte true from tfte fatee. 3nb tt ia not 
too mucl) to bope tfjat *ucb fuller fenotol- 
ebge toill not onlp pre tferbe u* from 
biBquictube, but toill rebeal to us a 
nearer anb clearer toieto of tfje g>on of 
4£ob, anb tfma toorfe in our beart* anb 
Itoes a defter lifeenea* to ©im. J3nb 
tbi* ts tt)e true aim of all biblical 
&>cf)olar*i)ip. 

Joseph agar beet. 




OFFICIAL ORGAN* NATIONAL CHRUTIAN AJJOCf ATION 
10 CENTf A COPY EJTABUJHED 1868 LOO AY CAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
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PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
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make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered ats Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
lit the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
Vlarsa 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Leave It With Him, poem 1 

Lincoln Nebraska Frats. — The (Lincoln, 
Nebr.) State Journal ' 1 

Moody Bibfe Institute 1 

Obligation of Royal Highlanders 2 

Masonic s Burial Service 2 

The Army Y. M. C A., by James E. 
Phillips 4 

'President Blanchard's Letter 5 

Friends' Peace Principles 

Adams, John Quincy, ^Letters of 10 

"Vernal Falls," Yosemite. i 12 

The Lodgeville Church 13 

Masons Hold Solemn Ritual. — The Post. . .16 

The Masonic Scotch Rite "Mystic Ban- 
quet" ..., 16 

Dominant Fruits of Fraternities 17 

Religion vs. Secretism, by O. G. Davis 17 

Masonic Peace Terms, by Rev. J. M. 
Foster 18 



N. C. A. Annual Meeting 19 

News of Our Work: 

Why Do the Heathen Rage ? 19 

From a Masonic School Principal .- 21 

Workers Report Progress ....... ... $1 

Eastern Secretary's Letter, Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard 28 

Southern Agent's Report, Rev. F. J. 
Davidson L i 

From Darkness to Light 23 

Contributions 27 

■■,,,'" ' •' ' •■ — "' " » '~ 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Heemstra; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomas C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below: 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 251a 14th St, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, EUendale, N. D. 
Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton, Calif. 
Kid. G. B. Crockett. Dermott Ark. 



Vol. LI, No, 1. 



CHICAGO 



May, 1918 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

— Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 


him: I 


spake 


openly 


to the 


world, 


and in 


secret 


have I 


said nothing. 


— Joh 


n 18:20 



LEAVE IT WITH HIM. 

Yes, leave it with Him, 
The lilies do ; 
And they grow ; 
They grow in the rain, 
And they grow in the dew — 
Yes, they grow ; 
They grow in the darkness, all hid in the 

night ; 
They grow in the sunshine, revealed by the 
light; 

Still they grow. 

They ask not your planting, 
They need not your care 
As they grow ; 
Dropping down in the valley, 
The field — anywhere — 
There they grow ; 
They grow in their beauty, arrayed in pure 

white ; 
They grow clothed in glory by heaven's own 
flight; 
jj Sweetly grow. 

The grasses are clothed 
And the ravens are fed 
From his store ; 
But you who are loved 
And guarded and led, 
. How much more 
Will He clothe you and feed you and give 

you his .care? 
Then leave it with Him ; He has everywhere 
Ample room. 

Yes, leave it with Him ; 
'Tis more dear to his heart, 
You will know, 
Than the lilies that bloom 
Or the flowers that start 
'Neath the snow. 
Whatever you need, if you ask it in prayer, 
You can leave it with Him, for you are his 
care; 

You, you know. 

— From The Transcript. 



To live in the presence of great truths 
and eternal laws, that is what keeps a 
man patient when the world ignores him, 
and calm and unspoiled when the world 
praises him. — -Balzac. 



LINCOLN NEBRASKA FRATS. 

Lincoln parents can afford to take a 
moment's time to emit at least a silent 
cheer for the Lincoln school board for 
its firm, persistent and painstaking 
wrestling with the stubborn high school 
fraternity problem. It is a fight to save 
the souls of the coming generations of 
boys. The degrading influence of the 
fraternities is again proved by the fact 
that numerous boys who last September 
pledged their honor to keep clear of fra- 
ternities are now discovered to have con- 
tinued their fraternity relations under 
cover of a change of name. Dishonor, 
lying and deceit seem to be the dominant 
fruits of a fraternity training. What it 
means to turn such an output loose upon 
the business, social and political life of 
the community requires no great imag- 
ination to see. People with children to 
send to high school later must especially 
acknowledge the service the school board 
is doing them and their children by its 
present efforts to stamp out the frater- 
nity infection. — The State Journal, Lin- 
coln, Nebr., 1918. 



MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE. 

Thirty-six men and women graduated 
April 18 from the Moody Bible Institute 
of Chicago, having completed the two 
years' course in Bible Doctrine, Gospel 
Music and Practical Christian Work. 

The enrollment this term was the 
largest in the history of the Institute. 
Since the United States entered the war 
the Institute has furnished for the battle 
line at the front over 30 men for re- 
ligious work and 60 men to bear arms. 

During the past eight months 68 of its 
students have been called to serve as 
missionaries in seven foreign fields un- 
der 14 different missionary boards. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 
announces a Special Summer Music 
Course for the Evangelistic Singer and 
Player, for the six weeks extending from 
June 26 to August 7. 

The Institute has a music course facul- 
ty of eight capable and experienced in- 
structors under the supervision of Dr. 
D. B. Towner, the well-known hymn 
writer and composer. 

Students have the privilege of attend- 
ing any of the other classes of the Insti- 
tute without additional cost. Instruction 
is given in the English Bible, Personal 
Evangelism and Practical Methods of 
Christian Work. A bulletin outlining the 
courses offered and giving full informa- 
tion will be sent upon request. 



OBLIGATION OF ROYAL HIGH- 
LANDERS. 

"Upon my most sacred honor I do 
solemnly and unreservedly promise that 
I will forever hold a perfect silence upon 
the secrets of the Royal Highlanders when 
in the presence of those who do not be- 
long to this fraternity, and should my 
membership from any cause ever cease, 
I shall still regard this vow binding, as 
long as life shall last. I will abide by 
the edicts and requirements of the Royal 
Highlanders now in force, or which may 
be adopted by them. In no event will I 
recommend for beneficial membership 
any person whom I do not believe to be 
in sound physical health and worthy of 
our fellowship and protection. Upon my 
most sacred honor I pledge my support 
to the cause of the Royal Highlanders 
and promise to assist in every way not 
inconsistent with right and honor, in up- 
building and sustaining this institution, 
which has by Prudence, Fidelity and 
Valor agreed to protect me and mine. 
Signed 

Witness .... at .... This .... day 
of . . . ., 191. .. 

This must be attached to the applica- 
tion or forwarded immediately to F. J. 
Sharpe, Chief Secretary, Aurora, Nebr. 
Whether initiated or not, every insured 
person is considered a fraternal member 
of the Royal Highlanders. This work 
is based on Scottish history and is calcu- 
lated to teach Prudence, Fidelity and 
Valor." 



MASONIC BURIAL SERVICE. 

We have been requested to publish the Ma- 
sonic funeral services. To print the service 
in the lodge room and home or church and 
the service at the grave would take too much 
space, but we will endeavor to publish enough 
to give one some knowledge of these services. 
We quote from the "General Ahiman Rezon 
and Freemasons' Guide," by Daniel Sickels, 
and published by Masonic Publishing Com- 
pany, New York City. — Editor. 

"The brethren having assembled at the lodge 
room, the lodge will be opened briefly in the 
third degree, * * * when the service will 
commence and all the brethren will stand: 

"Master : What man is he that liveth 
and shall not see death? Shall he de- 
liver his soul from the hand of the 
grave ? 

"Senior Warden : His days are as 
grass, as a flower of the field, so he 
flourisheth. 

"Junior Warden: For the wind pass- 
eth over it and it is gone ; and the place 
thereof shall know it no more. * * * 

"Junior Warden: God is our God for 
ever and ever ; He will guide, even unto 
death. 

"Master: Shall our brother's name and 
virtues be lost upon the earth forever? 

"Response by the Brethren: We will 
remember and cherish them in our hearts. 

"Master : I heard a voice from heaven 
saying unto me, 'Write from henceforth 
blessed are the dead who die in the Lord ! 
Even so, saith the Spirit, for they rest 
from their labors'." 

Here the Master takes a paper prepared for 
the purpose called the "Sacred Roll!," on 
which have been inscribed the name, age, date 
of initiation or affiliation, date of death of 
the deceased, and any matters that may be 
interesting to the brethren, and shall read the 
same aloud, and then say : 

Almighty Father ! In thy hands we 
leave, with humble submission, the soul 
of our departed brother. 

Response. Amen ! So mote it be. 
* * * 

Prayer by the Master or Chaplain. 

Almighty and Heavenly Father — in- 
finite in wisdom, mercy and goodness — 
extend to us the riches of thy everlast- 



ing grace. * 



As we mourn the de- 



parture of a brother beloved from the 
circle of our Fraternity, may we trust 
that he hath entered into a higher broth- 
erhood, to engage in nobler duties and in 
heavenly work, to find rest from earthly 
labor and refreshment from earthly care. 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



* * * And to thy name shall be all the 
glory forever. Amen ! 

Response. So mote it be." 
After the services at the lodge room a 
procession is formed which proceeds to 
the church or to the house of the de- 
ceased, and after the clergyman shall 
have performed the religious services of 
the church, the Masonic services should 
begin. The Master takes his station at 
the head of the coffin and other officers 
take their places, and the members form 
a circle around the coffin. The Chap- 
lain or Master repeats a prayer, in which 
all the Masons are supposed to join, 
Scripture passages are quoted, a hymn 
sung. The one before us ends with the 
following verse : 

By them, through holy hope and love, 

We feel, in hours serene, 
Connected with the Lodge above, 

Immortal and unseen. 

Following this hymn the Master or 
Chaplain repeats a prayer. 

SERVICES AT THE GRAVE. 

"When the procession has arrived at the 
place of internment, the members of the 
Lodge should form a circle around the grave ; 
when the Master, Chaplain and other officers 
of the acting Lodge take their position at the 
head of the grave and the mourners at the 
foot. The Chaplain rehearses the following 
or some other appropriate prayer : 

Almighty and most merciful Father, 
we adore Thee as the God of time and 
eternity. * * * And when our toils on 
earth shall have ended, may we be raised 
to the enjoyment of fadeless light and 
immortal life in that kingdom where 
faith and hope shall end, and love and 
joy prevail through eternal ages. And 
Thine, O righteous Father, shall be the 
glory forever. Amen ! 

Response. So mote it be. 

The following exhortation is then given by 
the Master : 

Brethren : The solemn notes that be- 
token the dissolution of this earthly 
tabernacle have again alarmed our outer 
door, and another spirit has been sum- 
moned to the land where our fathers 
have gone before us. * * * And having 
faithfully discharged the great duties 
which we owe to God, to our neighbor, 
and ourselves ; when at last it shall please 
the Grand Master of the universe to 
summon us into his eternal presence, may 
the trestle-board of our whole lives pass 



such inspection that it may be given unto 
each of us to "eat of the hidden manna" 
and to receive the "white stone with a 
new name," that will insure perpetual 
and unspeakable happiness at his right 
hand. 

The Master then (presenting the apron) 
continues : 

The lambskin, or white apron, is the 
emblem of innocence and the badge of a 
Mason. It is more ancient than the 
Golden Fleece or Roman Eagle ; more 
honorable than the Star and Garter when 
worthily worn. 

The Master then deposits it in the grave. 

This emblem I now deposit in the 
grave of our deceased brother. By it we 
are reminded of the universal dominion 
of Death. The arm of Friendship can 
not interpose to prevent his coming ; the 
wealth of the world cannot purchase our 
release ; nor will the innocence or youth 
or the charms of beauty propitiate his 
purpose. The mattock, the coffin, the 
melancholy grave, admonish us of our 
mortality, and that, sooner or later, these 
frail bodies must moulder in their parent 
dust. 

The Master (holding the evergreen) con- 
tinues : 

This evergreen, which once marked 
the temporary resting place of the illus- 
trious dead, is an emblem of our faith in 
the immortality of the soul. By this we 
are reminded that we have an immortal 
part within us, that shall survive the 
grave, and * * * through our belief in 
the mercy of God we may confidently 
hope that our souls will bloom in eternal 
spring. This, too, I deposit in the grave 
with the exclamation, "Alas, my broth- 
er !" 

The brethren then move in procession 
around the place of interment and severally 
drop the sprig of evergreen into the grave, 
after which the public grand honors are given. 

The Master then continues the ceremony : 

* * * We can only sincerely, deeply 
and most affectionately sympathize with 
them in their afflictive bereavement. But 
we can say that He who tempers the 
wind to the shorn lamb looks down with 
infinite compassion upon the widow and 
fatherless in the hour of their desolation ; 
and that the Great Architect will fold the 
arms of his love and protection around 
those who put their trust in him. 

Then let us improve this solemn warn- 
ing that at last, when the sheeted dead 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



are stirring, when the great white throne 
is set, we shall receive from the Omnis- 
cient Judge the thrilling invitation, 
Come, ye blessed, inherit the kingdom 
prepared for you from the foundation of 
the world. 

The following may be sung. We quote the 
last verse : 
Thou art gone to the grave, but 'twere wrong 

to deplore thee, 
When God was thy trust and thy guardian 

and guide; 
He gave thee, He took thee, and soon will 

restore thee 
In the blest Lodge above, where the faithful 

abide. 



THE ARMY Y. M. C. A. 
The Workers and the Work. 

The secretary in Army Y. M. C. A. 
work undoubtedly puts in the longest 
and most strenuous hours which have 
ever heretofore fallen to his lot. He arises 
at six in the morning and retires at ten 
o'clock at night. He does not need any 
urging to retire as physically he is tired 
out and considers it a lucky day, if it so 
happens that he can slip beneath the cov- 
ers a half hour earlier than usual. 

Each of the Y. M. C. A. workers, be 
he religious, educational, physical, or 
social secretary performs of course the 
special duties of his office. That is his 
principle work, but in addition to these 
he has a daily program of services in- 
cluding an hour for conference of the 
Building Force. A portion of this con- 
ference time is used by the religious sec- 
retary for a sort of family worship ; and 
part is used to discuss the problems 
which concern the work of the various 
secretaries, or of the local work as a 
whole. He must give one period to cal- 
isthenics, another to ''policing" (sweep- 
ing out) the building. He must take a 
half hour for personal bible study. Then 
too, he must have a period for other 
definite studies to keep from mental rust- 
ing ; and he must also take time for recre- 
ation. Besides this he will have certain 
periods assigned to "desk duty" which 
means selling stamps, or fruit, or candy 
to the men. Once a week there is a 
general Camp Conference and occasion- 
ally there are other special conferences. 

There is no place in Army Y. M. C. A. 
work for the man who will not willingly 
do the humblest task, even the janitor 



work, which is politely called "policing." 
We are here to serve the soldiers and 
must not be above doing tasks such as 
he is called upon to do. The secretary 
must maintain an attitude of selfrespect, 
best illustrated, perhaps by the saying 
that we are "not above the private, nor 
inferior to the officer." 

Many no doubt wonder why the cleri- 
cal work of selling stamps, candy, etc., is 
not given to some person hired for that 
purpose, rather than requiring the secre- 
taries to spend two or three hours daily 
at these tasks. Experience has shown 
that over the counter it is often possible 
to reach men and for their spiritual good 
in a way that would otherwise be impos- 
sible. The real business of the secretary 
is to reach the soldiers' spiritual life and 
to do it successfully, he must follow all 
the trails in. We seek a point of con- 
tact, as a pedagogue would put it, and 
when a man stops at the counter for a 
stamp or for candy it is usually an easy 
matter to engage him in conversation and 
soon the point of contact or trail in is 
found. 

It was while at counter service that I 
had one of my earliest opportunities to 
do personal religious work. I was talk- 
ing with a member of the trench mortar 
brigade, nicknamed by the soldiers the 
"suicide club" because the average time 
of life when in the front trenches is so 
very short. I had found out that he had 
no Testament but would like one, so in- 
vited him and his companion into my 
room. The Y. M. C. A. never refuses 
a man a Testament, but we always try 
to have the. soldier agree to carry it with 
him and read at least a chapter every 
day and thus become a member of the 
"Pocket Testament League." A more 
attractive Testament is reserved for those 
who will make this pledge. 

After I had signed this soldier up for 
his Testament I turned to his companion, 
as I supposed, and what was my surprise 
to discover it was not the soldier I had 
supposed but another who had followed 
me into my office. It took an instant to 
overcome my surprise. I found that he 
had overheard my conversation with the 
other soldier and wanted a Testament 
too, so had followed along. I also found 
that he was not a Christian but knew he 
ought to be and was ready to become one 



Ma/, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



if I would point the way. This I did as 
carefully and prayerfully and thoroughly 
as I could, though the banging of rag- 
time on the piano on the opposite side 
of a single board partition, made my 
work exceedingly difficult. However, the 
Lord can work in situations that are ex- 
ceedingly difficult for us, and I had the 
joy of seeing this man accept Christ as 
his Lord and Savior. 

At another time an Italian who had 
been led to Christ a few days before 
brought to the "Y" two of his friends, 
also Italians. All three had been mem- 
bers of the Catholic church but had lost 
confidence in it and had ceased, some 
years before, to attend. This one who 
had confessed Christ had been baptized 
in a city church a few nights before, and 
was now making his religion practical 
by going out for his friends. I hap- 
pened to be the one to whom they came 
with the statement that they too wanted 
to be baptized. So I took these boys into 
a conference room and instructed them 
as carefully as I could on what it means 
to be a Christian and the steps necessary 
to become one. It was necessary to go 
over some things several .times and at 
different angles so as to be sure that they 
comprehended my meaning, for they were 
both natives of Italy. Finally I had the 
joy of seeing these boys kneel and in 
broken English confess their sins and 
accept Christ. They too were later bap- 
tized and received into membership in an 
evangelical church. 

These are two instances of particular 
interest to me which I have personally 
observed. They are not rare or unusual 
but rather are typical of the work being 
carried on throughout the Army Y. M. 
C. A.'s in the Southern Department and 
I believe through all the other depart- 
ments. We need your constant prayers 
that we may do our work right and neg- 
lect no opportunities to feed the spiritual 
needs of the soldiers. 

James E. Phillip^ 
Secy. Army Y. M. C. A. 
Camp Stanley, Texas. 
February 25th, 10/18. 



Seek ye the Lord while He may be 
found, call ye upon Him while He is 
near. — Isa. 55 :6. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 
In the Mouth of Two or Three Witnesses. 

I was a few weeks ago in Ontario at- 
tending a Bible conference. One of my 
fellow teachers there was a man of beau- 
tiful spirit and great excellence as a 
teacher. As we were entertained in the 
same home we had quite a bit of fellow- 
ship and on one occasion got to speaking 
of Free Masonry. Lie told me that when 
he was a young man the lodge was quite 
influential in the region where he lived 
and, as is very common, the members of 
it were quite determined that he should 
join. He did not have any special ob- 
jection, knowing nothing about the or- 
ganization, having heard nothing but 
good about it, and so finally allowed his 
name to be proposed. The night of his 
initiation, he said, after being prepared 
in the ante-room, he was led into the 
lodge and there seemed thruout the 
ceremony a good deal of confusion. 

Blinded as he was, he noticed the noise 
and also observed that the voices seemed 
to be very much alike. When finally he 
was allowed to see he learned that the 
Master of the lodge, though present, was 
drunken and incapable. The most of the 
members were not up in the ritual and 
were not able to recite their parts, so 
that practically the dialogues between the 
Master, the Senior Warden and the 
Junior Warden, etc., were all of them 
carried on by one man. He said that the 
whole thing was so nauseating to him, a 
Christian, that he never returned to the 
lodge. The members of it were quite 
determined that he should, and when they 
found that their efforts were in vain, that 
he was not to take the two following de- 
grees, they raged at him like a company 
of wild beasts. 

This is not a new thing nor a strange 
thing, but it shows how the spirit of Cain 
still animates the Cain religions of our 
time. Another remark which ought to 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



be made in this connection is that if this 
young man had had information he 
would probably have never had anything 
to do with the Order at all. Who, then, 
is at fault for this slip into paganism? 
Undoubtedly the religious teachers of 
this young man, who ought to have in- 
formed him of the character of the or- 
ganization. 

The Duty of the Minister. 
Our secretary recently put into my 

hands an article written by a minister 
on the attitude which pastors should take 
toward fraternal organizations. After 
speaking of the suspicion which has ex- 
isted among teachers respecting Secret 
Societies, he says, "Happily this feeling 
of suspicion has entirely abated, and 
whatever opposition lingers in any quar- 
ter to-day is based on other reasons. Oc- 
casionally one finds among pastors and 
elders a mild sentiment of jealousy and 
disappointment that men who attend 
church infrequently are yet interested in 
one or more lodges and give time and 
support to them." 

He then goes forward to speak of the 
influential position which lodges occupy 
by reason of numbers and financial 
strength. There is no doubt that his 
statements in regard to this subject are 
largely true. The same thing can be 
said, of course, for the tobacco trade, the 
whisky business, prostitution and other 
great vices. It is also to be remarked 
that the influence of these vicious forces 
in society is like the influence of the 
lodges — a secret one. Secret Societies 
are not promoted generally by discus- 
sion. When men wish to organize a lodge 
or to revive a lodge the rule is that they 
go quietly into a town, slip into offices 
and houses, work from those they have 
to those they want, and while the great 
mass of honest workingmen in the com- 
munity are occupied with their homes 
and their business affairs these lodge men 
are securing recruits for their lodges.' 



In like manner all organizations, institu- 
tions of enterprises which destroy the 
spiritual lives of men are promoted by 
secret solicitation. As my honored fa- 
ther used to say, "They grow not by rea- 
sons addressed to the understanding, but 
by lures addressed to the lusts." 

The writer goes forward to comment 
on the changed attitude of the public 
toward religious duty. He says that re- 
ligion during the past ceutury has over- 
come the narrow individualism of past 
reformation times and has been coming 
to its own as a Kingdom of Heaven on 
earth. He continues to say, "For those 
who may not know, it must be said that 
nothing so generally and thoroly char- 
acterizes American lodges as their 
moral tone, their mutual helpfulness, and 
their distinctively religious principles, 
practices and teaching. The Scriptures 
find place in the lodge room and lodge 
ritual ; and prayer has a part in every 
meeting, and instruction looking to noble 
character and living enter into every 
ceremony." 

His conclusion is that churches and 
lodges should be congenial rather than 
antagonistic. He thinks the purposes of 
the two organizations are much the same, 
and that the pastor will gain greatly in 
sympathy and active co-operation if he 
works with the lodges of his community. 
Three Giant Iniquities. 

I do not consider myself an old man, 

yet I have lived thru two great national 
educations and a third is already well 
under way. 

When I was a boy slavery ruled our 
country with a rod of iron. Its enemies 
believed it ought to die, but did not see 
how it was possible that it should ; its 
friends believed it to be invincible and 
freely declared their faith, yet in so few 
years that it still seems like a dream it 
was sleeping its endless sleep in its bloody 
grave. 

Running a parallel course with Ameri- 



May, 19)8 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



can slavery was the American saloon ; 
that also believed itself to be immortal. 
Good men, members of churches, used 
to refuse to contribute money to our col- 
lege because we were opposed to that 
business. Ministers used to apologize 
for it and seek to justify it by one fiction 
and another. A stage driver with whom 
I was riding in Missouri many years ago 
said to me, "I tell you, mister, you will 
never down the whisky business as long 
as there is eight cents of profit in a 
ten-cent drink." In those days drunken 
representatives and senators were very 
common, and the whole city of Wash- 
ington was under the heels of the liquor 
trade. There is much remains to be done, 
but the advance is absolutely startling 
when one considers the present situation. 
Eleven states have already ratified the 
constitutional amendment prohibiting the 
manufacture and sale of intoxicating 
liquors for beverage purposes. The fu- 
ture is known only to God, but we have 
a right to believe that the amendment 
will shortly be law and the liquor trade 
an outlaw, as in the Kingdom of God it 
always has been. 

The third of this dark trinity is the 
Secret Society system. It has been in- 
timately connected with the other two. 
It originated in taverns among drinking 
men and the early songs were Baccha- 
nalian in character; passing from labor 
to refreshment meant stopping Christless 
praying and beginning to get drunk. 
Slavery was in every way congenial to 
the lodge organizations ; slavery had its 
masters, so did the lodges, and the prin- 
ciple of lodge organization is entirely har- 
monious with the spirit of slavery. The 
oath of a lodge man binds him to conceal 
and obey; the power is in the hands of 
a few, the masses are to pay their dues 
and do what they are told. This last evil 
is more fundamental than either of the 
others, for lodgism not only encourages 
vices, but it attempts to sanctify them 



by religious forms. If a slaveholder had 
read a chapter in the Bible; sung a hymn 
and prayed every time he was going to 
sell a slave or buy one or whip one, or 
if a saloonkeeper should have a religious 
service when he got in a lot of whisky 
or beer barrels, and another prayer time 
when he began a big day's work at the 
bar, or a short closing religious ceremony 
when he put the drunkards out into the 
street at night, this would correspond to 
the religious attitude of the lodges. 

In these days, when lodge rooms are 
elegantly fitted up and when the coarser 
elements in lodge ceremonies are hidden 
so far as possible, there are many men 
who are in these organizations who do 
not know what their character is at all ; 
they believe them to be real Christian or- 
ganizations. I could give many proofs 
from my own experience, if it were neces- 
sary, but as slavery and the trade in intox- 
icating drinks became known to be what 
they really were and finally passed into 
the general condemnation of all worthy 
men and women, so Free Masonry and 
the lodges of which it is the mother must 
also in due time come to their own re- 
ward. Being, as they are, essentiallv 
pagan in character, this fact must become 
known and Christians must withdraw 
from and antagonize them as they do 
other forms of evil. 

The Apostasy Is On. 

When ministers like the one whom I 
have quoted above say that the church 
and the lodge can get on quite har- 
moniously, the answer is that this is 
true, provided the church is an apos- 
tate church. Wherever one finds a re- 
ligious system which is destitute of Chris- 
tian spirit and faith he finds a system 
which is in entire harmony with all other 
systems of like character. There is no 
magic in words, we Christians deal with 
realities ; saying Christ, if one does not 
mean Christ and worship Christ, is sim- 
ply profanity — it does no good to any- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



one ; and saying- God when one is wor- 
shiping the Devil does not make Satan's 
worship a different thing from what it 
has been or any better than it has been. 

A preacher in a Christian pulpit, who 
does not believe in Jesus Christ and who 
does not preach his Word, is no better 
than a lodge master in a lodge doing the 
same sort of thing. So as the apostasy 
continues and increases, no doubt apos- 
tate churches and apostate ministers will 
come more and more into harmonious 
fellowship with antichristian systems 
like Free Masonry, but in the end Christ 
will destroy his enemies. It is very sad 
to know that some of them will be found 
among his professed friends, but they 
will die like Balaam did among the en- 
emies of God, if they live among them ; 
first or last, every man and institution 
goes to its own place. 

God Allows Evils to Culminate Before 
They Are Destroyed. 

Belshazzar made a feast to a thousand 
of his lords. He brought out the sacred 
vessels which had been stolen from the 
temple of God in Jerusalem. In that 
night of Bacchanalian festivity no one 
would have dreamed that the end of the 
Assyrian empire was at hand. There 
were, so far as we know, no signs in 
earth or sky, but the armies of the Medes 
were already preparing for the ruin of 
the empire, and while Daniel was giving 
his exposition of the writing on the wall 
the troops of Cyrus were marching thru 
the river gates of the city. "In that 
night was Belshazzar slain." 

It was so in the days when the papal 
church was drawing near the end of its 
unquestioned supremacy. I do not for- 
get that this organization still lives; I 
remember that it is still very powerful, 
but it has not the ability, even if it had 
the disposition, to do the dark deeds 
which were common in the inquisition 
times. When the Pope of Rome was 



able to compel kings to grovel in the dust 
at his feet, to stand outside castle walls 
in frost and snow. When the inquisi- 
tion could arrest, transport, torture and 
kill anyone it pleased thus to treat — 
those were the days when this baleful 
empire was tottering to its fall. The 
Romanism of to-day is not the Roman- 
ism of that day. No doubt many des- 
perate deeds are done by the rulers of 
this church in our time. In Mexico, 
South America, Sardinia and Spain un- 
doubtedly many things are wrought out 
in the secret dungeons of the church 
which would horrify, if they became 
known. They would also be suppressed 
if they became known. The claws of the 
tiger have been clipped and, though he 
still has great power for evil, he has no 
such power as he formerly possessed, and 
his ruin came when he seemed 'to be at 
the summit of his authority. 

I have often reminded my readers that 
it was so with slavery. The power of 
that devilish system had increased until 
in this country in 1857 to : 86i it seemed 
invincible; even the church of Jesus 
Christ was largely terrified into abso- 
lute silence. There was the Dred Scott 
case I think in 1857, John Brown was 
hanged in 1859, it looked as if the slave- 
holders were to rule both church and 
state forever, but "In that night was Bel- 
shazzar slain." The great Lincoln, born 
and reared in a clay-floored log cabin in 
Kentucky, had been prepared through 
the providence of God to strike the final 
blow in the age-long war between slavery 
and freedom. 

It has been so with the liquor trade, 
and, altho the dying struggles of this 
old serpent will be violent, still they are 
dying struggles. It will be so with the 
lodge system. To-day it is fairly bois- 
terous in its assertions of power and 
purpose to rule, but it is afraid. In the 
midst of its secret dens it is afraid. The 



Mav, 191! 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



effort to secure legislation to protect its 
foolish and wicked ceremonies is evi- 
dence of this fact, and "In such an 
hour as ye think not" it will be destroyed. 

The Prohibition Party. 
It is extremely interesting to notice 
that in these days, when the prohibition 
amendment has been proposed by the 
Senate and House of Representatives and 
when already eleven states have voted 
to make that amendment a part of the 
law of the nation, so little is heard of the 
Prohibition party. We who have been 
voting with that party for all the years 
since 1884 seem to have little or nothing 
to do except to stand and see the salva- 
tion of. God. We have never elected a 
president, we have never elected any con- 
siderable number of congressmen. State 
legislatures have not been controlled by 
us, yet our testimony has been owned by 
God, and now Republicans and Demo- 
crats are proposing a prohibition amend- 
ment to the constitution of the United 
States, and state legislatures controlled 
by Republicans and Democrats are rati- 
fying that proposed amendment and say- 
ing that it should become law. This is 
a remarkable fact, no man who takes it 
in fails to wonder at it, yet it is quite ac- 
cording to the method of God ; and we 
shall see in the destruction of the lodge 
system a repetition of what we have al- 
ready seen in the destruction of Ameri- 
can slavery and the apparent approach 
of the end of the drink trade; so men 
should have good courage, should quietly 
go along day by day doing their duty 
which is revealed, and in his own time 
God will permit us to see his salvation. 
"Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye 
steadfast, immovable, always abounding 
in the work of the Lord, inasmuch as ye 
know that your labor is not in vain in 
the Lord." 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



FRIENDS' PEACE PRINCIPLES. 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Reli- 
gious Society of Friends for Pennsyl- 
vania, New Jersey, Delaware and 
Parts of Maryland. 

This decisive hour of history summons 
our society to make its utmost contribu- 
tion to humanity's deepest needs. Be- 
lieving that this requires us to meet the 
moral and spiritual issues of the times 
simply and fearlessly, we feel called to 
make clear our Christian faith as applied 
to war. 

Our society's opposition to all war as 
un-Christian has been maintained 
throughout its history. In 1660 our fore- 
fathers declared: 

''We utterly deny all outward wars and 
strife, and fightings with outward weapons, 
for any end, or under any pretense whatever ; 
this is our testimony to the whole world. The 
Spirit of Christ by which we are guided is 
not changeable, so as once to command us 
from a thing as evil and again to move unto 
it; and we certainly know, and testify to the 
world, that the Spirit of Christ, which leads 
us into all truth, will never move us to fight 
and war against any man with outward 
weapons, neither for the Kingdom of Christ 
nor for the kingdoms of this world:' 

These convictions have been reaffirmed 
by Friends in all generations and during 
the present war our Yearly Meetings 
throughout the world have given clear 
evidence that they are steadfast to the 
same principles. 

The basis of our opposition to war is 
much more than any single command of 
the " Old or the New Testament. It is 
our faith that the way of love by which 
our Master, Jesus Christ, met and con- 
quered evil, remains for his followers 
today the true method of combating 
wrong. For us, as for Him, this in- 
volves refusal to use means which, like 
war, violate love and defeat its ends ; but 
it does not mean a weak neutrality to- 
ward evil. For us, as for Him, it means 
a life of action devoted to the heroic pur- 
pose of overcoming evil with good. The 
unspeakable sufferings of humanity are 
now calling us and all men to larger sac- 
rifices and more earnest endeavors to 
put this faith into practice. To such en- 
deavors we dedicate ourselves. 



"Great peace have they that love thy law. 
and nothing shall offend them.'' 



io 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



iloljtt ($umnj Abams — Bxxt^ fir? B\bt ttt $ntt?& ^latf s 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons 1 , and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

To Benjamin Cowell, Esq., Providence, 

R. I. 

Washington, 28 November, 1832. 

Sir : — Your letter of the 22nd instant, 
inclosing your address before the Anti- 
masonic convention, held at Providence 
on the 2nd. instant, proposes a question 
of considerable difficulty, namely, by 
what means the institution of Free- 
masonry, with all its exceptionable prop- 
erties, may be put down. 

I answer, by the voluntary dissolution 
of the society, or by its extinction by the 
forbearance of others to contract its ob- 
ligations. 

I have hoped that the virtuous and in- 
telligent members of the order, upon find- 
ing that all their secrets have been re- 
vealed and made public ; upon perceiving 
the numerous atrocious crimes connected 
with the murder of Morgan, and to which 
their oaths, obligations and penalties have 
given rise ; and upon discovering the gen- 
eral obloquy into which the institution 
was gradually sinking, would frankly 
have abandoned it of their own accord. 
This expectation has not been fully real- 
ized. But great numbers of Masons have 
ceased to frequent the lodges ; numbers 
of lodges and chapters have suffered 
their charters to expire; and I believe 
the instances are now few in which they 
swear a man, upon the penalty of having 
his throat cut from ear to ear, to keep 
secret from every human being what 
every human being who will read the 
books of David Bernard and Avery Allyn 
knows as well as the brightest Masons 
of the land — still, the majority of Ma- 



sons do adhere to the craft, and refuse 
to give up their idol. The only way to 
deal with them is to bring to bear upon 
them public opinion; and that mode of 
treatment has been pursued with regard 
to the disease with considerable and en- 
couraging success. 

I concur with you in the opinion that 
the administration of Masonic oaths, ob- 
ligations and penalties ought to be pro- 
hibited by statutes of the state legisla- 
tures, with penalties annexed to them, 
not of cutting throats from ear to ear, 
nor of cutting the body in two by the 
middle, nor of opening the left breast 
and tearing out the heart and vitals, nor 
of smiting off the skull to serve as a 
cup for the fifth libation ; but with good, 
wholesome penalties of fine and imprison- 
ment, adequate to their purpose of de- 
terring every master, grand master, 
grand king, or other dignitary of the 
sublime and ineffable degrees, from ever- 
more polluting his lips with the exe- 
crable formularies which have at length 
been dragged into light. Most cordially 
would I, were I a member of any state 
legislature in the Union, give my voice 
and vote for the enactment of such moni- 
tory statutes. But this cannot be ef-' 
fected so long as Masonry controls the 
majorities in the state legislatures — that 
is, so long as the people continue to elect, 
as members of the state legislatures, ad- 
hering Freemasons, or men who are 
neither Masons nor Antimasons, or what 
you call moral Antimasons ; men who dis- 
approve Masonry, but are afraid of in- 
curring Masonic vengeance by raising a 
finger or uttering a word against it ; men 
whose virtue consists in neutrality be- 
tween right and wrong, and who are 
willing to believe that to refuse their votes 
to a man because he is an adhering Free- 
mason is persecution. So long as the 
people continue to constitute majorities 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURK 



11 



of their state legislatures of such men as 
these, so long will it be idle to expect 
any statutory enactment against Masonic 
oaths, obligations and penalties. 

It is, therefore, the duty of pure and 
disinterested Antimasonry to operate, as 
well as it can, upon public opinion ; and 
one of the most effective modes of thus 
operating is the ballot-box. It is just 
and proper that every individual hon- 
estly believing that the Masonic insti- 
tution is an enormous nuisance in the 
community, which, if not voluntarily re- 
linquished, ought to be broken down by 
the arm of the law, should resolve that 
he will vote for individuals as members 
of the state legislatures entertaining, 
upon this subject, the same opinions as 
himself, and for none other. If this 
resolution be just and proper for each 
individual separately, it is equally so for 
as many individuals collectively as can 
agree upon the principle. Far from 
being obnoxious to the charge of perse- 
cution, it is, perhaps, the mildest of all 
possible forms of operating upon public 
opinion — by public opinion itself; It is 
thus that Antimasons have acted ; first 
in the state of New York, where the 
Morgan murder has fastened upon the 
hand of Masonry a spot of blood like 
that which the dream of Macbeth "s wife 
paints upon hers, and which all the per- 
fumes of Arabia can never sweeten ; and 
subsequently in other states, including 
that of Rhode Island. Thus far the prin- 
ciple of political Antimasonry has my 
hearty approbation ; and in the diversity 
of opinion which still unhappily prevails 
on this question it is a satisfaction to me 
that the dictate of my judgment coincides 
with that of a large majority of the in- 
habitants of my native town, my friends 
and neighbors, and of a highly respect- 
able portion, if not a majority, of the 
constituents whom I have the honor of 
representing in the congress of the 
United States. 



With regard to the political course of 
the Antimasons in Rhode Island, I am 
not a competent judge. To the cause of 
Antimasonry I consider the legislative 
investigation of the last winter as having 
essentially contributed. It has substan- 
tially settled the question what the oaths, 
obligations and penalties of Freemasonry 
are; it has cut short all quibbling equivo- 
cation and attempts to blast the credit of 
Avery Allyn and David Bernard ; it has 
given us these oaths, obligations and pen- 
alties in their naked deformity ; it has 
dragged the struggling savage into day, 
and has shown us the last writhings of his 
Protean form, in the impudent preten- 
sion that the death of a traitcr, in Ma- 
sonic language, means the death of a 
martyr. To the conclusions of the ma- 
jority of the committee of investigation, 
namely, that it is the indispensable duty 
of Masons to dissolve their fraternity, I 
respond, Amen and amen ; though, when 
I read their report and observe the 
orocess by which they reach them, I can- 
not forbear an exclamation of astonish- 
ment at the novel process of induction 
•by which their conclusion slaps the face 
of ail their premises. 

I hope and trust that the Freemasons 
of Rhode Island will ultimately follow 
the advice of the committee of investi- 
gation, which so magnanimously waived 
the legislative right of exacting testi- 
mony to their secrets, and thus suffered 
the law of the land to cower before the 
law of Masonic secrecy. I thank the 
committee for having peremptorily ex- 
acted the real oaths, obligations and pen- 
alties, as taken and administered in 
Rhode Island, and consider the result as 
having settled, in the mind of every rea- 
sonable, and independent man, their na- 
ture and their character. 

Respectfully, sir, 

Your servant and fellow citizen, 

- John Quincy Adams. 



12 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 





1 




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Si- ' 


IBS ^e *^UI wi> 


1 w^ 
1 "5* ■ 


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Mi fa 





VERNAL FALLS, Y0SEM1TE. 



May. 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH. 

BY JENNIE L. HARDIE. 
CHAPTER I. 

"Why, father Thompson! Did you 
tell the girls they might go to that ball 
tonight?" There was less of inquiry 
than of astonishment and reproach in 
the voice, and the little woman's eyes 
opened wide and looked keenly at her 
husband, who sat by the large kitchen 
table scanning the columns of the weekly 
newspaper as if a ball were the farthest 
of all things from his thoughts. 

"Ball ?" returned that gentleman, slow- 
ly laying aside the paper and elevating 
his spectacles, "they didn't call it a ball. 
Cad said there were going to be some 
'doings' at the hall tonight and ventured 
the information that she and Debbie were 
going. I suppose I said 'all right,' or 
something of that sort." 

"It is a Masonic ball," persisted little 
Mrs. Thompson, "and that Mr. Vallance 
is to wait on Carrie there. This will be 
the first time the girls have ever attended 
a dance of any kind. Do, father put 
your foot down here and now," and the 
speaker fairly trembled with excitement. 

"Oh — I — don't know, mother," in a 
deprecating tone, "their minds are set 
on going; let them go this time." 

"Let them go this time! Why, 
T-i-m-o-t-h-y T-h-6-m-p-s-b-nr There 
was a long chapter of rebuke in this pro- 
longed exclamation, which Mrs. Thomp- 
son would probably have enlarged upon 
had not voices in conversation been heard 
nearing the house, and giving vent to her 
distressed feelings in a whispered, "O 
dear !" she sought the room where her 
daughters, Carrie and Debbie, were ar- 
raying themselves for the event of the 
evening. 

"I'm sorry, girls, you didn't tell me of 
this before," she said, in a tone some- 
what severe. "You know you have never 
been allowed to go to such a place and 
that I would not have given my consent. 
It is not too late now to change your 
minds. Invite Tom and Mr. Vallance to 
spend the evening here." 

"Oh, pshaw !" came impatiently from 
the lips of Carrie, the elder of the two, 
"Pa said we might go. All the girls are 
going — Blanche Gillman and 'the Trow- 
ley girls, and — " 



"Which is, of course, no reason why 
you should. Oh, girls! I had so hoped 
that— that— " 

"That we'd turn to be of the goody- 
goody kind and eschew all such wicked- 
ness," interrupted Carrie. "For my part 
I think we're just as good as — " 

"Don't talk to mother that way, Car- 
rie," said the younger sister in a pitying 
tone. "If you don't want us to go, 
mother — " But just then a familiar 
voice came ringing through the house — 
"Aunt Tilda, where are you?" 

It was Tom Rees' voice, who always 
called Mrs. Thompson "Aunt Tilda" 
since a day years before when she had 
taken him in her arms to try to soothe 
the little heart that gave vent to its sor- 
row for the dead lying in another room, 
in the plaint — "I wants my mamma, I 
do ; I wants my mamma." From that 
day forth she had been to him "Aunt 
Tilda," and though the uncle with whom 
he had since lived had recently intimated 
that some time in the future he would be 
obliged to change this form of addresj, 
he put a stop to further teasing by an- 
swering promptly, "Like as not." 

"I don't want you to go, dear," said 
Mrs. Thompson, in answer to her daugh- 
ter's unfinished sentence. But the voice 
came up again loud and cheery, "Hurry 
up, Debbie," and whisking her hat from 
its bandbox she hastily fastened it on 
and hurried after her sister, who was 
already descending the stairway. 

Mrs. Thompson stood for a moment 
or two in deep thought, then clasping 
her hands she sank beside a chair and 
poured out her heart's sorrow into that 
ear that bows down to listen, and when 
she heard the footsteps of her loved ones 
die away in the distance, joined her 
husband by the kitchen fire. 

Mr. Thompson sat with his elbows 
leaning on his knees, his head in his 
hands, his eyes fixed intently on the 
glowing embers. Presently he spoke : 
"What do you think of Vallance, Tilda?" 

At this question another occupant of 
the room, the only son of the Thompson 
household (a youth of seventeen or 
thereabouts — quiet, some said a stupid 
boy, who never expressed an opinion un- 
less compelled to do so, who seldom 
spoke at all, in fact, unless spoken to) 



II 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



looked up with a quick flash of the eye, 
and then drawing the paper towards him 
began perusing its contents. 

"Oh, father, I am so troubled," was 
the indirect reply. "What are we all 
coming to? It reminds me of the passage, 
'Because iniquity shall abound the love 
of many shall wax cold.' Here we are 
at the end of a three weeks' protracted 
meeting with almost the only ones who 
manifested any feeling on the subject of 
religion our own daughters, and now they 
go off to a Masonic ball !" And Mrs. 
Thompson arose and busied herself 
about the room unable to remain quiet 
under the pressure of nervous agitation. 

"It is strange, Tilda, very strange. 
They sent us their 'biggest gun' and we 
expected something would be done. Now 
what's the trouble ? I've asked that ques- 
tion a hundred times, I guess, and I 
can't solve it?" 

Again came a quick, sharp look from 
the eyes behind the newspaper. Mr. 
Thompson continued, "I can't make it out, 
Tilda, unless the Lord has forsaken this 
place altogether. This makes the fourth 
winter we've tried to have a revival and 
without any success. The place is grow- 
ing worse instead of better. Think of 
that minister's grand sermons last week 
with a dozen or so to listen to them, and 
that saloon and billiard hall crowded. I 
don't understand it." 

"And one of the prominent men in the 
church allowing his daughters to attend 
a ball directly after the meetings are 
closed," suggested his wife. 

"I know it, Tilda ; I'm discouraged. I 
don't believe I ever felt so wicked in my 
life. I had my mind made up that the 
meetings would accomplish something 
this year. Why won't people here turn 
out to religious meetings, Tilda? Why 
isn't somebody converted?" 

Little Mrs. Thompson took several 
turns about the room busying herself 
with this and that, then stopping near 
her husband, asked : "Timothy, how 
many men are here in the church who 
don't belong to the lodge?" 

Another quick lifting of Daniel 
Thompson's eyelids and then, though his 
gaze was fixed on the words before him, 
it was evident he was awaiting the reply. 

"How many men in the church don't 



belong to the lodge ? Why, there's Home- 
ly, of course, and Trowley, and — and — I 
guess that's all. Why do you ask, Tilda?" 

"Because, father, I believe that hall 
over the saloon is a wicked place, too. 
I believe that lodge is a rival to the 
church. Can we expect that God will 
honor the labors of men who one night 
claim him as their master, and the next 
meet in a place where his name is cast 
out ; where the most impious oaths are 
taken to bind them to secrecy and — but 
there, Timothy, it makes me almost 
angry to think about it. I believe our 
church must come out from the lodge, 
so to speak, before God will work 
through it." 

"Pooh, Tilda, what do you know about 
it? Now—" 

"I think that is the reason, Timothy. 
Your lodge stands in the way of the on- 
ward progress of God's Zion, and all I 
can say is I hope something will be done 
to remove it out of the way." 

CHAPTER II. 

"Come, girls, you will go to prayer 
meeting, won't you?" 

This question was asked by Mrs. 
Thompson on the evening following the 
one on which the ball took place, so it 
was no wonder that Carrie, who had 
been cross and sleepy all day, answered 
snappishly, "I am not. Who wants to 
hear the same rig-ma-role every Thurs- 
day night for a dozen years? Nobody '11 
be there but Mr. and Mrs. Homely, Mr. 
Trowley and Mr. Gillmari and Uncle Job 
Dee, seeing he's back — for who ever 
knew him to miss a prayer meeting — 
and you and pa and the minister. He'll 
get up and read a long, dry chapter and 
preach from it half an hour. Then you'll 
sing, T Would Not Live Alway,' and 
pa'll lead in prayer. Mr. Gillman will 
enumerate the many mighty deeds done 
in Old Testament times and tell the Lord 
they are types by which the present gen- 
eration may be profited. Then the rest 
will take their turns in praying and tell- 
ing their experiences, all beginning with 
the stereotyped 'Brothers and Sisters' 
and closing up with, T ask an interest in 
your prayer.' Finally, you'll all sing 
'How tedious and tasteless the hour,' and 
be dismissed. No, I know all their 



May. 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



experiences and prayers by heart — I 
don't want to go." 

Carrie's description was in one respect 
at least truthful. Mr. Thompson glanced 
over the vacant pews and noted that 
those only whom she had mentioned were 
present, excepting indeed Debbie, and 
Tom. Later Daniel Thompson came in 
and sat with half-shut eyes in the far- 
thest corner. 

Mrs. Thompson was unusually cheerful 
this evening, which was something of a 
puzzle to Tom Rees and Debbie. Truth 
to tell, the dance of the previous night 
had been voted by each of them "a fail- 
ure," and the several times repeated as- 
sertion of Debbie to her sister, "It was 
mean of us to go when we knew how 
mother would feel bad about it," showed 
a heart ill at ease, and as she noted the 
happy manner of her mother while chat- 
ting with Mrs. Homely, she whispered 
to her companion, "I'm so glad mother 
don't mind it much ; I was afraid she 
wouldn't get over feeling bad about it 
for a week." 

But Debbie was quite mistaken as to 
the secret of her mother's cheerfulness. 
All the previous night she had lain 
awake, thinking, praying. Hour after 
hour sped on. She heard Debbie's hand 
on the latch, her light footstep on her 
chamber floor, and some hours later Car- 
rie's more weary home-coming. She 
heard the chanticleer's loud call in the 
barnyard, the rattling of stove-covers 
and kindling-wood as Daniel built the 
morning fire, and still sleep had not vis- 
ited her eyelids. As the night passed, so 
did the day. Like one in a dream, she 
performed her household duties, till, late 
in the afternoon she came from her 
closet with that air of calm. The burden 
of her prayer had been, "O, that this tide 
of wickedness might be stayed," but now 
her rested heart whispered, It shall be 
done." 

The meeting began quite after Carrie's 
description. Elder Kemp read a portion 
of Scripture, a verse was sung, Mr. 
Thompson led in prayer, followed by 
Mr. Gillman and Mr. Trowley, then Mrs. 
Thompson arose. It was not the time 
yet for speaking. In fact (as Carrie 
would have said) it was Mr. Homely 's 
turn to pray. Mrs. Thompson's voice 



betrayed intense earnestness as she said : 

"Brothers and sisters, we have often 
asked each other the question, 'What is 
the cause of our failure to secure a re- 
vival of religion among us?' Is not our 
God as mighty as ever? Are not his 
promises as sure? The cause must be 
with us. Let us talk about it tonight, 
friends. I feel my own dear ones — the 
children of many prayers — to be sliding 
down the death-road. I can't help being 
aroused. O", let us find and remove the 
cause." 

"Amen!" came in a voice of thunder 
from Uncle Job Dee, who arose to speak 
but quickly gave way to the leader of 
the meeting, who was also upon his feet. 

Elder Kemp said, "Brethren, this ques- 
tion has troubled me very much, but I 
am glad to say it is settled now since I 
have left it with God. We have just 
closed a series of meetings. What they 
were you all know. We had the best 
talent within our reach. We spared no 
pains in striving to gain a hearing before 
the masses, but we failed. ■ Could we 
have done more?" 

"Yes, sir, zee could, 'cordin' to my way 
o' thinking," was the reply of Uncle Job 
as he sprang to his feet. '' 'Cleanse your 
frauds^ ye sinners, and purify your hearts, 
ye double minded! I think that 'ere 
Scriptur' fits us to a T. We'll go till 
Gabriel's trump sounds without a re- 
vival if we don't cut loose from them 
'ere 'bominations" — indicating the direc- 
tion of the saloon, over which was the 
Masonic hall. "Brother Homely, what's 
that bit o' Scriptur' that says there's no 
use in our prayin' as long as we hold to 
any o' the devil's doin's? As long as 
we bow and scrape to the devil's best 
man that's a batchin' it over that 'ere 
saloon we might 'bout as well stop pray- 
in'. That's common sense 'cordin' to my 
way o' thinkin'. You draw a line right 
here and call out every man who Stan's 
up straight for God with his back to that 
'ere saloon and billiard hall and den of 
Hiramites an' let them go to prayin' an' 
you'll see !" 

Uncle Job sat down. The profound 
silence that followed was broken by a 
low, musical voice which said, "Let us 
pray." It was Mrs. Homely. That such 
a separation might take place, that their 



JO 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



eyes might be opened to see those mon- 
sters of iniquity in all their hideousness, 
that each of those present might be en- 
tirely loyal to the Master — this was her 
prayer, the substance also of her hus- 
band's petition, and then came a short 
pause that was ended by the minister's, 
"Let us rise and be dismissed." 

But the meeting was not "closed." 
Though the Thompsons and Hornelys 
betook themselves to their several places 
of abode, the "meeting" did not come to 
an end till nearly morning, when Mr. 
Gilman, already separated on his home- 
ward way some twenty rods from Uncle 
Job, was heard to shout to that indi- 
vidual, "Mind you, this isn't the end." 

And the other shouted back, "You're 
right. It isn't." 

(To be continued.) 



MASONS HOLD SOLEMN RITUAL. 

Rose Croix Will Observe Extinguishing 

Lights and Mystic Banquet. 

The ceremony of extinguishing the 
lights and the celebration of the mystic 
banquet will be observed by Evangelist 
Chapter, Knights of Rose Croix, No. i, 
at the Cathedral of the Rite, Third and E 
Streets, Northwest, Washington, D. C, 
next Thursday night, beginning at 7 130 
o'clock, March 28, 1918. 

George Fleming Moore, sovereign 
grand commander, will make the princi- 
pal address and the exercises will be in- 
terspersed with vocal and instrumental 
music and a double chorus of trained 
vocalists. 

The ceremony of extinguishing the 
lights is typical of the hour when the 
veil of the temple in Jerusalem was rent 
in twain at the death of Christ, when 
darkness spread over the world, when 
the flaming star was eclipsed, when the 
tools of old Masonry were broken and 
scattered and the cubical stone sweated. 
The ceremony is observed each year by 
the Knights of Rose Croix. It ante- 
dates the ceremony of relighting the 
lights and restoring order in the temple 
by three days. This ceremony will be 
observed Easter Sunday at 3 p. m., at 
the cathedral. 

Attendance upon these ceremonies is 
obligatory upon every member of the 
Rose Croix degree. — The Post, Wash- 
ington, D. C., March 22. 



THE MASONIC SCOTCH RITE "MYS- 
TIC BANQUET." 
"The Feast of Bread and Wine." 

A very full, clear and interesting ac- 
count of this pagan rite, the Mystic Ban- 
quet, which is celebrated by Scotch Rite 
Masons, may be found in "The Book of 
the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite 
of Freemasonry," by Charles T. Mc- 
Clenachan, 33 , Past Grand Master of 
Ceremonies of the Supreme Council, pub- 
lished by Masonic Publishing Company, 
New York. 

On page 261 we read, "The feast of 
Bread and Wine is to us the symbol of 
fraternity and affection and of that per- 
fect union which must ever exist among 
Knights of the Rose Croix." 

"With us it is simply a manifestation 
of fraternal love, as inculcated by Char- 
ity and Masonic philosophy. The solemn 
feast of the Rose Croix Knights is held 
this day and commemorates the feast of 
the Passover, observed by the Jews." 
Page 269. 

"The silver salver with Passover bread 
and goblet of white wine should also be 
provided. The altar should be plain and 
hung with black with the Book of Con- 
stitutions, and a square, compass and 
Crux ansata of gold upon it. On this 
most solemn festival, a young lamb, 
roasted, is to be eaten at the feast. It 
must be white, without spot or blemish, 
and killed with a single blow of a knife. 
One of the brethren must prepare it ; 
and the head and feet must be cut off 
and burned as an offering. At the repast, 
each must eat a piece. * * * This par- 
ticular repast is styled the Mystic Ban- 
quet." Page 266. 



The Mission of Scotch Rite Masonry. 

"Masonry has a mission to perform 
with her traditions reaching to the 
earliest times, and her symbols dating 
further back than even the monumental 
history of Egypt extends. She invites 
all men of all religions to enlist under 
her banners and to war against evil, ig- 
norance and wrong. You are now her 
Knight. * * * And may the great and 
supreme Architect be always with you 
and bless you with life everlasting." 
Page 261. 

My brother, you are still engaged as a 
Mason in search of light and truth, of 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



17 



which search the many journeys you 
have made in the different degrees are 
symbolical. But your search is not for the 
truth of any particular creed or religion 
— that search would be in vain, for what 
is truth to one is not truth to another; 
often by argument and evidence, but 
almost always by the accidents of birth, 
education and circumstances, our reli- 
gious belief is formed ; and argument and 
testimony strike the mind of man when 
arrived at his religious creed and faith, 
only to glance off and leave no impres- 
sion. 

Our symbols and ceremonies envelop 
the great primitive truths, known to the 
first men that lived ; with whatever par- 
ticular meaning they may have — pecu- 
liar, or believed to be peculiar, to par- 
ticular creeds, and differing, as the faith 
differs of those who receive them — we 
have nothing to do. * *.* Page 254. 

A vast multitude of men believe that 
the Redeemer of man has already ap- 
peared upon the earth ; many believe he 
was a man ; many, the Son of God ; and 
many, the Deity incarnate ; a vaster mul- 
titude* still wait for the Redeemer ; each 
will apply our symbols and ceremonies 
according to his faith. Page 255. 

Anthem. 
The Royal Craft, in days of old, 

On Mount Moriah's brow did raise 
A Temple roofed with glowing gold, 

Where Israel sang Jehovah's praise. 

Nature and Reason here unite 
Another house of God to rear, 

In which a God of love and light 
Is worshipped without abject fear. 

Free and accepted may we prove, 

When angels bring us near to thee, 

Prepared, in thy Grand Lodge above, 
To take our last Sublime Degree. 

—Page 261. 



DOMINANT FRUITS OF FRATERNI- 
TIES. 

The Nebraska State Journal of Lin- 
coln, in a recent number, gives some 
good advice calling upon parents to give 
the Lincoln School Board a cheer in its 
"fight to save the souls of the coming 
generation of boys." It further says 
editorially: "The degrading influence of 
the fraternities is again proved by the 
fact that numerous boys who last Sep- 
tember pledged their honor to keep clear 



of fraternities, are now discovered to 
have continued their fraternity relations 
under cover of a change of name. Dis- 
honor, lying and deceit seem to be the 
dominant fruits of fraternity training." 
The Journal might have added that in 
this respect secret society men are but 
children of a larger growth. It well says 
in the editorial, from which we are 
quoting: "What it means to turn such 
an output loose upon the business, social 
and political life of the community re- 
quires no great imagination to see." The 
editorial item referred to is quoted in 
full in this number. 



RELIGION VS. SECRETISM. 

BY 0. G. DAVIS. 

An important phase of the above 
named subject may be presented in the 
inquiry, "Should the church continue to 
bear an open and uncompromising testi- 
mony against organized secretism?" 

This thought was provoked in our 
minds by an article appearing in the 
Messenger a few months ago, in which 
this statement was made by one of our 
evangelists : "I find it almost impossible 
to conduct a successful revival in a 
strong lodge community." 

So, in defense of the above proposi- 
tion, we submit the following, as suffi- 
cient ground to discountenance all forms 
of secret, oathbound societies, ensnaring 
as they are in nature, pernicious in ten- 
dency, and perilous to the liberties of 
both church and state. 

Ask a lodgeman to "seek the Lord 
while he may be found, to call upon him 
while he is near," to join the church and 
profess Jesus' name, and he replies : "I 
am a lodgeman. We have our Bible, 
altar, ritual, and prayers. If I live up 
to the teachings of the lodge, / will be 
all right. The lodge is good enough for 
me." 

Is it not evident, from the replies re- 
ceived by those engaged in evangelistic 
work, that the lodgeman counts his 
lodge life his religion? This is a re- 
ligion, according to Mackey, the Ma- 
sonic writer, that satisfies the Mahom- 
medan, Buddhist, Jew, the pagan, and 
skeptic, and we knozu that this is not the 
religion of Jesus Christ. 

I have read the Scripture passages 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



used in the lodge, and noticed that the 
name of Christ is carefully expunged. 
In my collection of "secret relics" are 
the rituals, prayers, and translated se- 
cret language of two of the most promi- 
nent lodges in our land, and in their 
prayers no mention is made of Christ, 
and I know they are not the Christian's 
prayers. 

No doubt many who read this article 
have stood beside the open grave and 
heard the ceremony that transferred a 
drunken sot "from the lodge below to 
the lodge above." That, surely, can not 
be the Christian's heaven, referred to. 

Then, too, it is utterly a moral im- 
possibility for a good lodgeman to be 
a good churchman. The lodge and the 
church are diametrically opposed to 
each other in origin and purpose. The 
two, at the same time, are calling for 
energy and money and a man can not be 
an earnest supporter of both. In every 
city or town one sees the temples, halls, 
and lodgerooms which must be built, 
rented, and furnished. Then there 
comes the endless amount of parapher- 
nalia, parades, banquets, receptions, and 
dances, which are always advertised so 
profusely in the local papers, the reg- 
ular initiation fees, dues, and assess- 
ments. Every cent, contributed to the 
lodge, is withheld from the church, 
which is always in need of so much 
money to further the Gospel. We hear 
God saying, "Honor the Lord with 
thy substance" and there is no room for 
the lodge in that. 

Christ taught genuine charity in the 
parable of the Good Samaritan, upon 
which the Odd Fellows build a little 
ceremony and vaunt themselves as a 
charitable institution. A wounded man 
was lying by the roadside. The priest 
and Levite passed that way, but as the 
man did not belong to their order, they 
simply looked and went on. The Sama- 
ritan passed that way and the only sign 
he saw was the man's wounds ; the only 
password his groans ; and the only grip 
he gave him was the one he used to lift 
him onto his beast. 

That was the charity taught by Christ. 
It seeks no recompense and knows 
neither race, color, class, caste, sect, age, 
nor sex. The charity practiced by the 



lodge is only toward its members; no 
others need apply. Only towards those 
who possess a strong heart and lungs, 
towards those not afflicted with constitu- 
tional ailments, neither signs of illness, 
and who keep their dues paid up, with 
receipts of the same in their possession, 
do the lodge members "exercise charity." 
The charity stops when the pay stops. 

I would rather, yea, a thousand times 
rather, stand with the Psalmist in the 
twenty-sixth psalm, than be a top-notch 
degree lodgeman. The people of God 
are the best society we could wish to 
have. "For a day in thy courts is bet- 
ter than a thousand. I had rather be a 
doorkeeper in the house of my God than 
to dwell in the tents of wickedness." 
"To him that overcometh" (just such 
temptations as lodgeism) "will I give to 
eat of the tree of life." — The Gospel 
Messenger. 



MASONIC PEACE TERMS. 

Rev. J. M. Foster. 

Ex-president of Harvard, Dr. Charles 
W. Eliot, in the New- York Times, pro- 
poses a convention of the Entente Pow- 
ers to discuss terms of peace. Pope 
Benedict XV has given out a tentative 
basis for peace addressed to all the bel- 
ligerents, both Central and Entente. And 
a few weeks ago the Masonic lodges of 
France, Italy, Belgium, Portugal and 
Servia held a convention in Paris to 
draft a peace program. The German 
lodges were not represented, of course. 
The British and American lodges were 
not there. There are about 2,000,000 
Masonic lodge members in the United 
States and 500,000 in Great Britain. 
There are reported to be 3,000,000 mem- 
bers in all the world, leaving out Ger- 
many's 70,000. It will appear that the 
junto in Paris was a mere bagatelle of 
Masonic representation. The Boston Daily 
Herald for August 22, 191 7, had the fol- 
lowing editorial which is interesting: 

The "peace terms" set forth by members 
of the Masonic bodies in Belgium. France, 
Italy, Portugal and Serbia, assembled in Paris 
for the purpose, call attention to the gulf 
that exists between the Masons of continental 
Europe and those of America and the British 
empire. The lodges of the former have been 
for generations hotbeds of political plans and 
plots, while any participation in politics, or 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



11* 



any discussion of political matters, is strictly 
forbidden in British or American Masonry. 

To many persons, Masonry is Masonry and 
that is all that there is to it, and consequently 
there is much confusion and misunderstand- 
ing regarding the largest, the oldest and the 
most widely distributed of all secret orders. 
Though having common origins and tradi- 
tions, the Masons of most continental coun- 
tries have so given themselves over to politi- 
cal activities that the rest of the Masonic 
world has virtually severed relations with 
them. Yet both bodies are Masonic — just as 
the white Masons and the colored Masons in 
the United States have no official intercourse, 
though the colored lodges are just as "legiti- 
mate" as the white lodges, since both de- 
scended straight enough from the English 
lodges that got together to form their first 
grand lodge more than two centuries ago. 

No doubt some of the suspicion that per- 
sists here and there as to Masonic activity in 
American politics comes from the memory of 
the activity of Masonic leaders in the strug- 
gle for American independence. The story 
of the Boston Tea Party is but a chapter in 
the history of one of our old Boston lodges. 
Washington, Franklin, Hancock, Warren, Re- 
vere, Marion, Putnam, Lee, Greene, Livings- 
ton, Lafayette, De Kalb and Steuben — all 
these were Masons; and the traditions of 
Washington as grand master of Virginia 
make that office perhaps more honored than 
the governorship of the state. But all that, 
and even the activities of an Anti-Masonic 
political party in the '30s, is in spite of the 
consistent and essential abstinence of Amer- 
ican Masonry from any form of political ac- 
tivity. 

British Masonry takes the same attitude 
(abstinence from political activity). The 
Masons of Great Britain and Germany, un- 
like those of Great Britain and France, have 
maintained close relations — though naturally 
those relations are not at all cordial now. It 
so happens that neither King George nor the 
Kaiser is a member of the order, though the 
fathers of both were members. Neither in 
Germany nor in the countries mentioned as 
setting forth "Masonic peace terms" is Ma- 
sonry anywhere near so strong as in the Eng- 
lish speaking world. Of the 3,000,000 Masons 
in the world today close to 2,000,000 are in 
the United States and about half of the rest 
are in the British empire. Germany has less 
than 70,000, or about the present membership 
of the Massachusetts lodges. France and 
Italy together have about that number. Bel- 
gium, Serbia and Portugal combined have 
fewer than 10,000. 



N. C. A. ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Annual Meeting of the National 
Christian Association will be held 
Tuesday, May 21, 1918, beginning at 
10:30 a. m., in the Young Peoples Hall 
of the Lutheran Church, Rev. M. P. F. 
Doerman, pastor. The large number 
which will be sure to attend the eve- 
ning session will necessitate the use of 
the church adjoining the hall, which is 
located at 156 Grove Street, Blue 
Island, 111., which is about 20 miles 
south of Chicago on the Chicago & 
Rock Island Railway, main line. It is 
also on the electric line running be- 
tween Chicago and Kankakee, 111. 

Able speakers and a large audience 
in the evening are assured. The elec- 
tion of officers, the hearing of annual 
reports and other important business 
will be transacted. We urge the at- 
tendance of all members and give a 
special invitation to any others who 
may be able to be present. 

DAVID S. WARNER, 

President. 
NORA E. KELLOGG, 
Recording Secretary. 

iletogi of ®uv OTorfe. 

Since the publication of "Kind Words 
from Friends" has been a frequent oc- 
currence in the Cynosure, it has been 
suggested that it is only fair to let our 
readers have a few specimen of words 
that are not so kind. They may be found 
in this May number of the Cynosure. 



There is no sorrow I have thought 
more, about than this : That one who 
aspires to live a higher life than the 
common should fall from that serene 
height into the soul-wasting struggle 
with worldly annoyances. — Selected. 



' WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?" 
Scotch Rite Feelings Stirred by the N. C. A. 

We have been requested to publish the fol- 
lowing letter addressed to the National 
Christian Association, which seems to be an 
official pronunciamento of a Scotch Rite body 
to the membership of our Association. The 
writer signs himself a 32° Scotch Rite Mason 
and an "Almoner," dispenser of charity. It 
seems fitting that each friend and member of 
the N. C. A. should have the privilege of par- 
taking of his charity, and hence its publica- 
tion. He is a vigorous writer and an able 
exponent of Masonic spirit and doctrine. The 
italics are ours. — Editor. 

Youngstown, Ohio, Dec. 17, 19 17. 
Gentn : 

Your Association is evidently mis- 



20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



named. It ought to be called the Nation- 
al Association of Liars and Perjurers; 
to villi fy and besmirch the reputation of 
our Neighbors ; to hold them up as dan- 
gerous citizens — liberal premiums paid 
for any scurrilous story tending to injure 
the character of a Freemason, whether 
the story be true or false. 

The poverty of the English language 
prevents your being characterized in the 
terms which such cattle deserve. We 
only know of one journal that can even 
compete in any degree with your mean- 
ness and that is the "Menace," which the 
real Mason despises, although it does its 
meanness under the cloak of Masonry, 
as you do of Religion. Why, the Phari- 
sees whom Jesus so scathingly con- 
demned were saints compared to your 
people. 

There are different reasons why some 
people oppose Masonry. Some through 
their innocent ignorance oppose it as dam 
gerous simply because secret. Others, 
because they have tried to become Ma- 
sons and were rejected. Others, because 
they oppose forms and ceremonies as 
foolish. Others, as in your case, for 
filthy lucre, playing on the ignorance and 
superstitions of the public. The Catholic 
opposes it for reasons satisfactory to 
himself and is to be respected for his 
loyalty to the Church that tolerates no 
secrecy from the Confessional. 

The stupidity and asinine self-conceit 
of the man who vilely slanders a couple 
of millions of the very highest class of 
people of his country, among whom are 
fast increasing number of the clergy, 
that held most of the men who obtained 
our liberties and formed our government, 
that are held in the highest esteem every- 
where, is almost unbelievable. 

That there are unworthy Masons is 
only to say that Masonry is composed of 
men, and to judge an institution by its 
meanest members would be just as unfair 
as to judge the Church by such con- 
temptible liars as you people. Probably 
three-fourths of the Methodist clergy are 
Masons, most of the Episcopalians, Con- 
gregationalists and a fast increasing 
number of Presbyterians. You Pharisees 
had better look for a new place if you 
cannot associate with Masons, for you 
cannot be concerned in anything of any 



importance in which Masons do not fig- 
ure, and more and more. 

Masonry is increasing as never be- 
fore. The Church is being neglected be- 
cause men find more real brotherhood in 
fraternal orders than in the average 
church. It is the same with most other 
orders as well as Masonry. 

There is no conflict between Masonry 
and the Church. A very large majority 
of Masons are church members. It is 
the church's faithful ally, and for the 
man zvho will not take the church, it is a 
full substitute for it, teaching what Jesus 
and the Prophets taught was the sum of 
religion, supreme love and veneration for 
God, and love for the Brother. 

You may swindle a lot of innocent 
people out of their money, but you ought 
really to try to make money honestly and 
not steal it under the cloak of religion. 
Yours, &c, 

(Signed) J. A. Cooper, 

Almoner of A. A. S. R. 32 . 



Rev. A. G. Lyon, 113 Vornum Ave- 
nue, Lowell, Mass., has written several 
separate items of advice to the N. C. A. 
each practically alike. We quote one 
only : "Why waste your time and money 
on so foolish a piece of work? It is a 
piece of sheer wickedness to waste your 
money this way." We suppose Rev. Mr. 
Lyon refers to the publication of the 
Christian Cynosure since his advice 
was written on a blank requesting his 
renewal subscription to the magazine. 



The Christian Cynosure of Chicago, 
anti-Masonic and anti-everything else 
that does not agree with its peculiarly 
narrow creed, has given some informa- 
tion to Brother Norwood of Light. The 
"National Christian Association," of 
which it is the organ, includes 17 
Protestant denominations. * * * It is 
perhaps just as well that these petty 
sects, if they cannot agree in the things 
that are of love, shall accord in their 
hates — they should harmonize some- 
where. And so far as Masonry is con- 
cerned, the hostility of these people is of 
less account than the buzzing of gnats. 
To their outbursts we might reply as did 
the broad-shouldered husband who was 
asked why he allowed his frail little wife 
to whip him : "It pleases her and doesn't 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



21 



hurt me." The extent of their doings 
may be judged by the fact that while the 
man on the street has no difficulty in 
placing Masonry, it would take an un- 
usually well informed individual to give 
information of some of these enumerated 
denominations of "Christians" (?). — 
The American Freemason, October, 

"These petty sects" number at least 
2,000,000 members. The Lutherans 
alone have at least half of that number of 
antisecret members. There are many 
otherwise "unusually well informed indi- 
viduals" who have little interest in or 
knowledge of the Christian denomina- 
tions which make the religious life of 
our nation. 



FROM A MASONIC SCHOOL PRIN- 
CIPAL. 

Alex, Okla., March 22, 1916. 
National Christian Association, 

850 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Whoever You Are : Of all the rotten 
things that has come out of the rotten 
city of Chicago, your pamphlet, which 
you sent me on Freemasonry, is the most 
rotten. You call yourselves Christians. 
You are ignorant of the first principles 
of Christianity. If your clan had some 
of the penalties of Freemasonry ap- 
plied to you this country would be better 
off. I would like to tell you what I 
think of you, but the time would be 
wasted. I am sure the Lord will consign 
your souls to blackest regions of hell, for 
there and there only can you suffer suf- 
ficiently for your hypocrisy. 
Yours truly, 

(Signed) J. C. Weaver, 

Principal, Alex Fligh School. 



The chairman of the new Republican 
National Committee, Will H. Hays, is 
reported in the press as having a long 
tail to his kite : Scottish Rite Mason, 
Knight of Pythias, life member of Sulli- 
van Lodge of Elks, etc., and a staunch 
Presbyterian ! He is said to be a great 
"harmonizer" ; that that is his "middle 
name." He is equipped to harmonize the 
Lodge, the Church- and the Progressive 
with the Republican party. The pros- 
pect of a reign of righteousness and jus- 
tice under such leadership is not very 
assuring. 



WORKERS REPORT PROGRESS. 

A pastor in an Eastern State wrote 
the following at the request of the editor: 
"Since my last communication, in which 
I stated that six officers of the Red Men 
had been induced to leave the lodge, a 
member of the Maccabees has now also 
been persuaded to sever lodge connec- 
tions. A member of the Odd Fellows 
and of the Eagles is seriously consider- 
ing similar action. Naturally I am great- 
ly pleased to be able to make such an- 
nouncement, but I do so in no vain- 
glorious or boasting spirit, for I have 
merely set forth, after careful medita- 
tion, the principles and character of the 
Lodge in general, illustrating by means 
of the respective lodge rituals when pos- 
sible, and then appealed to the Christian 
conscience. 

"I hesitate to give in detail my mode 
of procedure and line of argument lest 
I appear presumptuous in your eyes ; 
nevertheless the kindly interest you 
manifest induces me to be a little more 
explicit. As a rule, I have dealt with 
Christians — members of my congrega- 
tion or candidates for membership. I 
am a member of the Lutheran Missouri 
Synod, and you know that as a synodical 
body we are opposed to the Lodge in gen- 
eral. We are opposed to all antichris- 
tian organizations because the Bible is 
opposed to the same ; and we have the 
courage to give expression to our con- 
victions. This point, antibiblical, un- 
christian, antic hristian, I have always 
emphasized ; constitution and by-laws, 
etc., were relegated to the background. 
What does the Bible teach? What does 
the Lodge teach ? God : triune, Father, 
Son and Holy Ghost. God of the lodge : 
a wax nose, that can be turned and twist- 
ed to suit the convenience and inclination 
of the individual. Prayer: the conver- 
sation of a believing heart with God ; 
faith in Christ is essential. Prayer of 
the lodge : directed to the Lodge God ; 
hence idolatrous, Christ excluded. Way 
to salvation : by grace, through faith, for 
Christ's sake. Lodge : be a good man, 
general morality. These three points 
placed in juxtaposition, with the corre- 
sponding proof-texts from the Bible and 
the ritual, offer ample food for serious 
reflection to any man who desires to be 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



on the side of the Bible. Rom. 16:17 
and 2 Cor. 6:14-18 sound a trumpet-call 
to action. 

"Lodge charity, lodge secretism, lodge 
obligations, have sometimes formed the 
opening wedge, and a general knowledge 
concerning the unwritten work of an or- 
der has served to gain me a hearing ; 
but the point which I seek to drive home 
is the false religion ; and when this has 
been established, fear and love of God 
demand, despite all other considerations, 
to avoid them, to come out from among 
them and be separate !" 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S LETTER. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

This finds me on my "spring drive" 
west. It is pleasant to travel when the 
flowers bloom and the birds sing. In my 
last report I forgot to mention the splen- 
did Quarterly Conference held in the 
Washington (D. C.) Free Methodist 
church, in which I was invited to partici- 
pate. This meeting was attended with 
unusual interest. The house was crowd- 
ed and the spiritual tide rose high. 

By special invitation of Dr. Albert 
Cook, in charge of the theological de- 
partment of Howard University at 
Washington, D. C, I was privileged to 
give two addresses of one hour each 
before his students. Some were mem- 
bers of lodges, but a majority did not 
approve of them. Much interest was 
manifest in the discussions and many 
questions were asked. 

In my westward journey I have vis- 
ited towns where I knew of friends, se- 
cured nearly 100 subscriptions to the 
Cynosure and delivered several ad- 
dresses. At New Concord, Ohio, I found 
the student body had contributed many 
to the war. One hundred and sixty of 
the United Presbyterian students of the 
college located there being in the service. 
At Zanesville I enjoyed a Sabbath speak- 
ing for Free Methodist friends in the 
morning and Wesleyan Methodist 
friends in the evening. Both churches 
have grown in membership. A live in- 
terest was manifest in our work. At Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, I was given opportunity 
to address students of the Capital Uni- 
versity. I first spoke in this university 
over 30 years ago. The children of those 



then addressed welcomed our message 
as had their fathers in former years. 
This is the ministerial training school of 
the joint synod of the Ohio Lutheran 
Church. As the pulpits are supplied 
from this fountain, it is a special privi- 
lege to keep right views on the lodge be- 
fore those studying here. On my arrival 
at Cedarville, Ohio, I learned our Cove- 
nanter friends were assembled in prayer 
meeting and found them discussing the 
Sabbath school lesson. Subject, "Con- 
fessing Christ." The need of more 
Christ life in all our relations in life was 
brought out. The lack of the Christ 
spirit brings all the trouble the world 
has. The Secret Lodge system leads the 
forces against Christianity. A visit to 
Cedarville always brings pleasant mem- 
ories, as it was here I found a wife, and 
that was over 30 years ago. Friends at 
Xenia and Dayton, Ohio, cheered with 
their accustomed expressions of good 
will. Together with our good friend, 
Mr. Charles Ervin, I attended what the 
pastor termed "a select" missionary 
meeting of the two United Presbyterian 
churches at Xenia and was much helped 
in listening to the recital of conditions of 
their work in Egypt and India as given 
by the returned medical missionaries. 
The trials of reform agents in these 
times is something, but they are not to be 
compared to the trials of those dealing 
with smallpox, leprosy, etc., as they find 
it amid the squaller of homes in those 
heathen lands. 

New friends with some of the former 
years were found at Richmond, Indiana. 
Churches of the Brethren, at and near 
Union City, Indiana, welcomed my last 
Sabbath addresses. Weather was fine, 
attendance and interest good. I am now 
at Monroe, Indiana, just in from Berne, 
where I spent three very pleasant days 
among those good Cynosure friends. 
Though having an unusual number of 
calls upon them, friends responded as 
usual in aid of our work. 

My plan is to work in Indiana, as 
doors may open until about the first of 
May. Friends desiring such help as I 
can give may reach me by addressing 
Secretary W. I. Phillips, 850 West Mad- 
ison Street, Chicago. Should we not re- 
joice that we are counted worthy to aid 
in the uplift of those who need our help? 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



SOUTHERN AGENT'S REPORT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

I have not been very well, nor have I 
done much since my last letter. The 
secret Empire is still growing strong and 
sapping the very life out of the churches, 
disturbing the peace of many homes, cor- 
rupting courts, stifling juries and per- 
verting justice, driving men deeper and 
deeper into sin, and hardening the hearts 
of many against the truth. 

I have preached half a dozen sermons 
and given the same number of antisecret 
lectures. I am in attendance at this 
writing of the First District Baptist As- 
sociation at Gretna, La. There are about 
600 delegates and visitors. I have not 
been permitted to speak as yet, but hope 
to do so before adjournment. 

I was secretary of this body for 15 
years and during those years this was a 
strong antilodge association of 60 church- 
es and 100 ordained ministers, only 10 
of whom were lodgemen. But now they 
have 85 churches with about 150 or- 
dained ministers. The hailing sign, the 
duegard, the sign of distress and many 
other signs are very manifest. I have 
found it impossible to secure a single 
Cynosure reader at this meeting. I am 
still without pastoral work. Brethren, 
pray for me. I am yours in brotherly 
love. 



FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT. 
An Open Letter. 

3oo Wabash Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 
Dec. 10, 1917. 
To the Worshipful Master and Brethren 

of Newton Lodge No. 142, A. F. & 

A. M., Newton, Kan. 
Gentlemen : 

This communication is written with 
hesitancy because of my position as one 
who has so lately passed from darkness 
to light, and yet I write gladly because I 
have passed from darkness to light and 
thereby desire to add my testimony to 
those who have already gone before me 
as good soldiers of that light. 

Following my becoming a Master Ala- 
son, my dear father passed on to his re- 
ward, and I, a prospective ministerial 
student, had his remains interred by the 
Masonic fraternity. Why not? Father 
had been a Mason for over 50 years. The 
so-called best men of Newton, Kan., 



were Masons, including pastors, Y. M. 
C. A. leaders, and church officials. In 
this 1 was but following the example of 
the Apostle Paul, who bore witness, 
"* * * because I did it ignorantly in un- 
belief." 

Ignorance and unbelief go hand in 
hand. I was ignorant of a better way 
than that of Masonic symbolism, even 
though I was a ministerial student. When 
enlightenment finally came to me, my 
unbelief excluded the true Light. 

"And this is the condemnation, that 
light is come into the world and men 
loved darkness rather than light, because 
their deeds were evil. For every one 
that doeth evil hateth the light, neither 
cometh to the light, lest his deed should 
be reproved." (John 3:19-20.) 

But a change came into my life. Not 
content with the teachings and assurance 
of the lodge, I hungered and thirsted 
after righteousness (Jesus Christ) and I 
became filled. 

Prior to this change in my life, I was 
religious, zealous and true to my convic- 
tions. Religious, because I yielded my 
heart that way. I became a staunch 
"churchianity Christian." I was one out 
of a hundred Entered Apprentices who 
prayed audibly when commanded to do 
so. I was zealous because I believed in 
making my speculative teachings oper- 
ative, that is, by living up to my obliga- 
tions. The same rule now guides me as 
a disciple of Christ. 

The lodge taught me many things. I 
never once betrayed any of the secrets of 
the lodge by word of mouth ; neither 
have I heretofore "written, printed, 
painted, stamped, stained, lettered, 
carved, marked or etched them upon any 
object, either movable or immovable." 
Among other things taught me in the 
lodge was that that blessed book — the 
Bible — which I kissed, and upon which I 
took my oaths, was the Greater Light of 
the Furniture of the Lodge. That great- 
er light — the Bible, God's Word — be- 
longs to me. In Him, of whom it teach- 
es, I "live and move and have my be- 
ing." 

Seeing that the Lodge has taught me 
that that same Bible is the first and fore- 
most Light of^ Masonry, let us go there 
to read, to ponder, to "prove all things" 
and to "Hold fast that which is good." 
(1 Thes. 5:21.) 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



Masonry taught me that as I stood 
without the door of the Lodge, being 
"neither naked nor clad, barefoot nor 
shod, hood-winked" (and that's no lie) 
with "a cable tow around my neck," that 
I was then in a lost condition, being in 
darkness. 

That was the truth, for I was lost in 
the darkness of my own self righteous- 
ness (Isa. 64.6). I was also without 
hope (Eph. 2:12-13) of Salvation in the 
world because I did not know Jesus 
Christ as my personal Savior. 

Then I was led to the door of the 
lodge by a friend whom I afterward 
found to be a brother, a brother in sin, 
see John 8 144, where I received the 
"shock of entrance." Thereupon, I was 
received into the lodge "upon the point 
of a sharp instrument applied to my 
naked left breast." Allow me to refer 
to that eminent Masonic author, Dr. Al- 
bert G. Mackey, and to his "Masonic 
Ritual," page 22 : 

"The Lodge is, then, at the time of the re- 
ception of an Entered Apprentice, a symbol 
of the World, and the initiation is a type of 
the new life upon which the Candidate is 
about to enter. There he stands without our 
portals, on the threshold of this new Masonic 
life, in darkness, helplessness, and ignorance. 
Having been wandering amid the errors, and 
covered over with the pollutions of the outer 
and profane world, he comes inquiringly to 
our doors, seeking the New Birth and asking 
a withdrawal of the veil which conceals 
Divine truth from his uninitiated sight." 

"Seeking the New Birth." Indeed! 
That was not my object in becoming a 
Mason ; and I dare say that it is not even 
thought of by as many as 1 per cent of 
all the candidates, yet the Masonic Lodge 
has the audacity to declare all such en- 
trants as having been born again. 

Let us turn to the "Greater Light," 
God's Word, for corroboration. "Ex- 
cept a man be born from above, he can 
not see the Kingdom of God." (John 
3:3.) Does becoming a Mason and be- 
ing born from above mean the same 
thing? Are they synonymous? Let us 
suppose that they are and "prove all 
things." Thus, except a man be born 
of the Masonic Lodge, he cannot see the 
Kingdom of God. That would exclude 
all women, all children below 21 years 
of age, all those born in bondage, all 
slaves, and all other classes debarred 
from the lodge beside those "black- 



balled" by members. Surely, if that is 
true, God must after all be a respecter 
of persons. 

Jesus Christ further says, in regard to 
this New Birth, "That which is born of 
the flesh is flesh, and that which is born 
of the Spirit is spirit." If my being 
made a Mason gave me that "new birth," 
is then the lodge initiation that self-same 
Holy Spirit of which I was born again? 
If the work of the lodge is this Holy 
Spirit, then God is a liar (Acts 10:34), 
and Lie has provided another foundation 
than that of Jesus Christ (1 Cor. 3:11), 
and salvation is not in the atonement of 
Jesus Christ (Acts 4:12), but is con- 
fined to those initiated into the A. F. & 
A. M. But if the Masonic claim is not 
true,- then the "new birth" of the Ma- 
sonic lodge is a satanic lie designed to 
deceive such unregenerate ones as I was, 
for it is written, "Evil men and seducers 
shall wax worse and worse, deceiving 
and being deceived" (2 Tim. 3:16). 

This letter is specifically written for 
the benefit of such deceived ones, 
"•* * * that they may recover themselves 
out of the snare of the Devil, who are 
taken captive by him at his will" (Tim. 
2:26). To all such Jesus says, "Ye shall 
know the Truth, and the Truth shall set 
you free." 

Masonry taught me the three theo- 
logical virtues : Faith, Hope and Charity. 
"Of these, Faith is first because faith in 
God is the first qualification for a candi- 
date for Masonry. Hope is the second 
because hope in immortality is a neces- 
sary consequence of faith in a Divine 
Being." 

Faith is also the first qualification re- 
quired of him who would become a 
Christian. But faith must have an ob- 
ject, hence the proper question: "In 
whom do you put your trust?" and the 
"poor blind candidate," and he verily is 
blind, is prompted to say, "In God." 
Which of the two Bible Gods, let alone 
the many pagan gods, is the object of 
that faith and trust. The first of these 
is Jehovah-God, the Creator of the heav- 
ens and the earth; He is the Father of 
Jesus Christ, of whom it is written, "I 
am the way, the truth and the Life; no 
man cometh to the father but by me" 
(John 14:6). Would you come to this 
God of the Bible? You must gain your 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



25 



entrance through Jesus Christ alone. Yet 
Jesus Christ is never once mentioned in 
the lodge work. There is a reason, as 
the Postum ads say, for the Devil hates 
that Name which is above every name 
(Eph. i :2i), and Masonry is subservient 
to Satan else Jesus Christ would receive 
honor for being that which he most em- 
phatiaclly is — God. He said, "I and my 
Father are One" (John 10:30). The 
prophet Isaiah, being divinely inspired, 
foretold Jesus as being "The Mighty 
God" (Isa. 9:6-7). This is not an inter- 
pretation but the written Word of that 
Greater Light of Masonry — the Bible. 
Jesus Christ being "God manifest in the 
flesh (1 Tim. 3:16) the candidates reply 
is synonymous to "I put my trust in 
Jesus Christ." But does he? Think of 
the Christ haters in the lodge making that 
statement ! 

True faith in God, then, is none other 
than faith in Jesus Christ, and hope in 
immortality is that Blessed Hope in im- 
mortality which is by Faith in Jesus 
Christ as God. But Masonry denies this 
God, Jesus Christ, as taught by the Bible 
— The Greater Light of Masonry. Christ 
is not the God of Masonry. . The Lodge 
could not come to Jesus as did Thomas 
and say, "My Lord and my God" (John 
20:28). As to that blessed Hope of Im- 
mortality, if the Lodge can confer, the 
New Birth upon all Masons without re- 
spect of whether they be unrepented 
Gentile, Jew, Mohammedan, Buddhist or 
plain infidel, then Masonry, and not 
Jesus Christ, is God's chosen instrument 
of Resurrection and Immortality. 
The Real God of Masonry. 

If, now, Jesus Christ and the Father is 
not the God of Masonry, then the other 
Bible god is their god. "In whom the 
God of this world hath blinded the minds 
of them which believe not, lest the light 
of the glorious Gospel of Christ, who is 
the image of God, should shine unto 
them" (2 Cor. 4:4). He is also the 
"prince of the power of the air" (Eph. 
2:2). He is the god of Masonry, the 
father of all Masons not born from 
above of the Holy Spirit (John 8:44), 
and his name is Satan, that "old Serpent, 
the Devil." 

Some Things Which I Was Taught. 

Finally, although we have not begun 
to touch the hem of this Masonic ear- 



ment, may we conclude this letter with 
several observations. Masons are fond 
of saying that Solomon founded the Ma- 
sonic Lodge, although this is neither a 
Bible nor a historical fact. Suppose we 
grant that perhaps Solomon did found 
the Masonic Lodge ; but there is no per- 
haps in that "Solomon did evil in the 
sight of the Lord." He built altars to 
the Pagan Gods of this present evil world 
to Ashtoreth, to Molech, and he built 
"a high place for Chemosh, the abom- 
ination of Moab (read 2 Kings n 15-8) . 
That being the case, Solomon re-estab- 
lished the Fligh places in direct dis- 
obedience to God's specific commands. In 
accordance to the teachings of the 
Baalamites who worshipped on these 
High places, Masonry re-establishes the 
objects of that worship, the Sun, Moon 
and Stars typified by the Worshipful 
Master, who rises in the east, and by the 
Senior and. Junior Deacons in the south 
and west. 

Of the working tools of a Master Ma- 
son, I was taught that as an Entered Ap- 
prentice I was born again, as a Fellow- 
craft I was still a Rough Ashlar (carnal 
man), and that the Master Mason is 
tuned from Rough Ashlar to a Perfect 
Ashlar by "the wholesome influence of 
expanding his intellect, restraining his 
passions, and purifying his life." This 
is all performed in the power of the 
Lodge without any intimation of succor 
from Christ or by the leading of that 
Holy Spirit of God. Jesus says, "With- 
out Me, ye can do nothing." Who is a 
liar? 

As to the apron, Masonry taught me 
that we as speculative Masons use if for 
a more noble purpose. * * * We are ad- 
monished to "preserve that blameless 
purity of life and conduct which will 
alone enable us hereafter to present our- 
selves before the Grand Master of the 
Universe, unstained with sin, and unsul- 
lied with vice." Tell me where can that 
"blameless purity of life" in this sum- 
mary of the unregenerated man be 
found? "As it is written, there is none 
righteous ; no, not one ; there is none that 
understandeth, there is none that seek- 
eth after God. They are all gone out of 
the way, they are together become un- 
profitable ; there is none that doeth good ; 
no, not one." Thus does Romans 3:10-12 



26 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



describe "both Jews and Gentiles." There 
is no "blameless purity of life" in such a 
man. Then, by what law of Masonry, 
or Mrs. Mary Baker Glover Eddy's Hin- 
doo Metaphysics, can you preserve that 
which you do not have? If this Satanic 
lie will alone be the means of our win- 
ning Immortality, where does the Cross 
of Jesus Christ come in? Where comes 
in the 427 references in the Word to 
"the precious blood of Jesus Christ"? 
Where "The Lamb slain from the foun- 
dation of the world" ? Where the bloody 
Redemption, the Remission of sins, the 
Justification by Faith, the Sanctification 
by God, the Righteousness which is of 
Jesus Christ, the operation of the Holy 
Spirit and all the other works of Grace 
in the hearts of men? They are not 
there, because the god of this world, 
Satan, has no place for these Bible doc- 
trines in his scheme of Masonic-Uni- 
tarian religion of "The Fatherhood of 
God, and the Brotherhood of Man." If. 
there is yet any doubt as to the merit of 
these "works," please read Galatians 
2 :i6 and Titus 3 4-6. 

Briefly, let me say : Masonry taught 
me to worship a false god. The God 
who created the heavens and the earth 
has many Scriptural names and titles but 
not once do we find any mention of "The 
Supreme Architect of the Universe" or 
the "Grand Master of the Universe." See 
how this compares with Romans 1 -.21-22. 
"Because that when they knew God, they 
glorified Him not as God, neither were 
thankful ; but became vain in their im- 
aginations and their foolish heart was 
darkened. Professing themselves to be 
wise, they became fools." 

Masonry taught me sexual morality, 
but I was only obligated to preserve the 
chastity only of those females who were 
the wife, daughter or sister of my fellow 
Masons. With all others I might do as I 
would and commit no sin. What a farce 
on morality. 

Masonry taught me to do all my 
benevolences and charities in the name of 
the Lodge, while the Bible, my Greater 
Light, teaches me "and whatsoever ye 
do in word or deed, do all in the Name 
of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God 
and the Father by him" (Col. 2:17). 
Which shall I do? I cannot obey them 
both. I cannot serve both God and 



Mammon. And so I might go on, and 
could, if I chose, write an expose of the 
Lodge, but that is not my purpose. My 
purpose is to be just what Jesus, my 
Master, would have me to be. 

It cost many a hard struggle with my- 
self before I came to the final decision 
which prompts this letter, and that de- 
cision was to lay everything at the feet 
of Him whom I call Savior, Lord and 
Master. Masonry could give me, and did 
offer me much. Which should be my 
slogan, "My help cometh from the Lord" 
or "My help cometh from the Lodge"? 
That was my question. There were 
many perplexities. To whom should I 
go for advice? The Holy Spirit prompt- 
ed me. Would I listen or harden my 
heart ? Well, the Spirit said, "He that is 
of God heareth God's words" (John 
8:47). And I obeyed. 

Are prestige, honor, man made distinc- 
tion, those things "which are highly es- 
teemed among men," a gain to me ? Hon- 
estly, I must answer, they are, "But what 
things were gain to me, those I counted 
loss for Christ. Yea, doubtless, and I 
count all things but loss for the excel- 
lency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus 
my Lord, for whom I suffered the loss of 
all things, and do but count them dung, 
that I may win Christ and be found in 
Him" (Phillipians 3:7-9). 

Going to the trestle board — this Great 
Light, this Word of God, the Bible— I' 
find God's will versus Masonry's will for 
my guidance and direction in the erection 
of a temple of Holiness in my heart, 
namely, "Be ye not unequally yoked to- 
gether with unbelievers, for what fellow- 
ship hath righteousness with unright- 
eousness and what communion hath light 
with darkness? 

"And what concord hath Christ with 
Belial or what part hath he that believ- 
eth with an infidel ? 

"And what agreement hath the temple 
of God with idols? For ye (those born 
from 'above' and of the 'Spirit') are the 
temple of the living God; as God has 
said * * * Wherefore, come out from 
among them and be ye separate, saith the 
Lord, and touch not the unclean things 
* * * saith the Lord Almighty" (2 Cor. 
6:14-18). 

It is enough. Although I sacrificed 



May, 19U 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



27 



my Masonic connections on the altar of 
Jesus Christ over two years past, I am 
now making public to Newton Lodge No. 
142, and to the world, that I have here- 
tofore and do now repudiate the lodge, 
and with it all other known forms of the 
"lust of the eyes, the lust of the flesh, 
and the pride of life." Standing with 
my Master, without the camp, I can do 
no other. 

Hoping that there are some in Newton 
Lodge No. 142, and in other lodges in 
general, who will choose to bear ignomi- 
ny, reproaches and persecutions rather 
than enjoy "the pleasures of sin for a 
season," and with the heart's desire 
(Romans 10:1-4) that they may be saved 
by becoming truly born from above of 
that Holy Spirit of God and justified by 
a real faith in Jesus Christ, who shed 
his precious blood for many for the re- 
mission of sins, I am sincerely, 
Your former lodge brother, and present 

well wisher, 

(Signed) Leon B. Mayer. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Dr. T. G. Roberts, 40c; Mrs. R. B. 
Buck and Mrs. C. S. Kennedy, each 50c ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ebeling, $2.75 ; Mrs. 
Samuel Legron, 96c ; Mrs. C. A. John- 
son, $2.50. 

Rev. P. H. Kromminga, Chas. P. Mor- 
lan, D. Hoogenboon, Mrs. Mary Fischer, 
G. Kamp, Alex Lais,- Eld. John Zuck, 
E. J. Clausen, Mrs. John Nicoll, W. A. 
Barnard, Eld. P. Beck, J. A. Peehl, Miss 

A. Brewer, Rev. John *P. Barrett, Bert 
Humphrey, Mrs. H. W. Stough, Miss 
L. L. Heath, Eld. J. H. Mahler, Lincoln 
Sheeler, Frank McLaughlin, Rev. R. D. 
Raiser, D. S. Anderson, Mrs. F. H. 
Frink, Mrs. Ella Crooks, E. E. E. Bai- 
ley, Mrs. Emma Carstensen, J. K. How- 
ard, Rev. Wilson T. Hogue, Rev. C. C. 
Enestvedt, Rev. A. J. Heisel, Rev. Chas. 
H. Seward. Rev. J. Appel, Mrs. Martha 

B. Park, Chas. A. Kellogg, each $1. 
Mrs. P. T. Woodward, D. E. Hayner, 

G. J. Ennis, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Orvis, 
Rev. D. B. Wilson, Rev. F. E. Allen, 
Miss Madge Roads, Mrs. Hedda Wor- 
cester, Hon. J. A. Conant, J. E. Hill, 
each $2. 

Rev. T. Harwood, Rev. P. T. Bunge, 
Rev. T. Bovd Tweed, Mrs. L. G. Almen, 
H. H. Ritter, B. A. Prichard, Ellen M. 



Manter, C. F. Minneman, a friend, S. R. 
Faris, each $4. 

Bert Humphrey, A. D. Cline, Rev. F. 
Stuart, D. A. Straw, Rev. J. G. Brooks, 
R. L. Park, John Purely, Mrs. Jas. E. 
Phillips, Rev. J. B. Van den Hoeck, Rev. 
Jesse W. Brooks, each $5. 

E. J. Darlington, $1.59; W. I. Phil- 
lips, $15; L. Hecault, D. D., $6; Whea- 
ton College Church, $19.60; Ralph B. 
Grove, $1.50; Miss Eliza F. Potter, 
$3.40; Church of the Brethren, per Sam'l 
Orr, $3 ; Reformed Presbyterian Church, 
per R. A. McCoy, $17.80; Church of 
the Brethren, per John Zuck, $9. 

Mrs. Mary W. Templeton, a friend, 
Mrs. C. Hillegonds, N. P. Bourne, Alex 
Lais, Miss N. S. Coleman, a friend, T. 
W. Stewart, Charles A. Blanchard, col- 
lection by F. L. McClelland, each $10. 

Rev. G. M. Robb and congregation, 
$7; Free Methodist Church, per Rev. B. 
Hosbach, $9; R. H. Taylor, $7.50; O. N. 
Barnes, $51.83; Reformed Presbyterian 
Church, per Rev. A. M. Malcolm, 
$10.50; Mrs. Georgia Brown, $25; H. 
Newmark, $20; Frank L. Gibson, $50; 
estate of Samuel Berlin, $25 ; estate of 
John Bradley, $500. 

Christian Reformed churches : Second 
Church, Grand Haven, Mich., $10; Sher- 
man Street, Grand Rapids, Mich., $15: 
Byron Center, Mich., $18.38; Prospect 
Park, Grand Rapids, Mich., $5 and 
$8.30 ; Classis of Pacific churches, 
$39.28 and $59.62 ; Classis Illinois 
churches, $10.10 and $8; Jennison, 
Mich., $5 ; Kalamazoo, Mich., $10; Beth- 
el, Grand Rapids, $9.25 ; Neland Avenue, 
Grand Rapids, $5 ; Dennis Avenue, 
Grand Rapids, $15; Cleveland, Ohio, 
Church, $10; Young People's Society, 
Alto, Wis., $5 ; 16th Street Church, Hol- 
land, $10.13; 9th Street Church, $14.14; 
Patterson, N. J., First and Second 
churches, $31.39; Young People's So- 
cietv, Clinton Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
$/.5o. 

Mr. James R. Stewart of Jenner, Al- 
berta, Canada, writes, renewing his sub- 
scription to the Cynosure: "The works 
of the Devil take on such a variety of 
forms that the Christian worker must 
keep himself well posted in order to suc- 
cessfully cope with all the different 
branches of evil." 



28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



STANDARD WORKS 

O N 

Secret Societies 

FOR SALE BY THE 

National Christian Association, 



HOW TO ORDER: 

PRICES quoted in this catalogue include car- 
riage prepaid by mail. Orders by insured mail, 
5c extra. 

TERMS — Cash with order. We do not wish 
to open accounts with individuals. When prices 
are not known, send sufficient and any balance 
will be returned to you. 

C. O. D. orders will not be filled unless $1.00 
accompanies the order. No books shipped on 
approval. 

REMIT by Bank Draft on Chicago or New 
York, or by Post Office or Express Money Or- 
ders. Personal checks should have 5c extra added 
for collection. 

WRITE your name and address plainly and in 
full, giving street number, post office box, R. 
F. D. number and box, and when ordering by 
express, give your express office if it is differ- 
ent from your post office address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASS'N. 
850 W. MADISON STREET. CHICAGO, TLL. 



STANDARD BOOKS 



ON FREEMASONRY 



FINNEY ON MASONRY, 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
60 cents. 

FREEMASONRY: An Interpretation. 

'By Martin L. Wagner, pastor of St. Johns 
English Evangelical Lutheran Church Dayton, 
Ohio, with an introduction by the Rev. G. H. 
Gerberding, D. D., professor of Practical Theol- 
ogy in the Theological Seminary of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church at Chicago, Illinois. 
This is a new book, and is a candid discussion 
of the institution Freemasonry, and offers an 
interpretation of its veiled expressions, art. 
speech, religion and e v hics, and of its symbols, 
emblems and ceremonies. This interpretation is 
based upon hints given and statements made 
by the highest Masonic authorities and tested 
in the light of sources from which these claim 
that Freemasonry is derived. Cloth, 560 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

MASONIC TEMPLES. 

A clear discussion of the religion of Masonry, 
by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. Contents: What is a 
Temple? Not Other Religions But the Christian 
Religion. The Lodge Bible Not the Christian 
Bible. The Masonic Religion Not the Christian 
Religion. Who or What is the Masonic God? 
The Roman Pantheon. Lodge Morals and Chris- 
tian Morals. 32 pages. 5 cents. $3.50 per hun- 
dred. 



FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
|otes v from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
\he truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with' the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master oi* 
Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book 
gives the work and ritual of Blue Lodge 
Masonry, the proper position of each officer 
in the Lodge-room, order of opening and clos- 
ing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry." Illustrated 
with 85 engravings. Contains the "unwrit- 
ten" work. New Revised Edition, enlarged 
to 275 pages; flexible cloth $1.00, paper 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and 
illustrations. It gives the correct method of 
conferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the 
oaths, obligations, signs, grips and passwords. 
All of which are correct and can be relied upon. 
Th3 accuracy of this work has been attested by 
high and unimpeachable Masonic authority. 
Cloth, $1.25; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character acd 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



29 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages in cloth, $1.50; paper, $1.00. 

EXPLANATORY. 
"Handbook of Freemasonry" and "Chap- 
ter Degrees," and "Knight Templarism 
Illustrated" give the 13 degrees of the York 
Rite. There are 33 degrees in the Scotc^ 
Rite, but the first three degrees as given 
in the "Handbook of Freemasonry" belong 
to both the York and Scotch Rites. These 
five books give 43 different degrees without 
duplicating. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition. 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
;hree Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

ADOPTIVE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the 
five degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas 
Lowe, comprising the uegrees of Jephthah's 
Daughter, Ruth, Esther, Martha, and Electa, and 
known as the Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, 
Wife's Degree, Sister's Degree and the Benevolent 

FREEMASONRY EXPOSED 

By Capt. William Morgan. The genuine 
old Morgan Book; republished with engrav- 
ings, showing the lodge room, dress of can- 
didates, signs, due-guards, grips, etc. This 
revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
murdered the author for writing it. 35 cents. 

MAH-HAH-BONE. 

Comprising "The Master's Carpet," which 
illustrates and explains the religious symbolism 
of the first three degrees of Freemasonry, and the 
"Hand-Book of Freemasonry," a complete and ac- 
curate exposure of the three degrees of Ancient 
Craft Masonry. By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master 
of Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago, Illinois. A 
volume of 679 pages, Cloth, $1.50; 

THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. Explains the true 
source and religious meaning of every symbol of 
the Blue Lodge, showing the basis on which the 
ritual is founded. By careful perusal of this 
work a thorough knowledge of the spiritual prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry can be obtained. Every 
Mason, every person contemplating becoming a 
member of the fraternity, and even those who 
are indifferent on the subject, should procure and 
carefully read this book. 406 pages, illustrated 
with 50 engravings. 75 cents. 

FREEMASONRY AT A GLANCE. 

Containing the illustrated secrets of thirteen 
degrees of Freemasonry; Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Commandery degrees. Also the 
ceremonies, signs, grips, passwords, etc., de- 
scribed and illustrated. 

Paper cover, 10 cents each. 



OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 
AMERICAN FREEMASONRY 

"A Study in American Freemasonry," based 
upon Pike's "Morals and Dogma of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite," "Mac-key's Masonic 
Ritualist," "The Encyclopaedia of Freemason- 
ry" and other American masonic standard 
works. By Arthur Preuss, Editor of the Cath- 
olic Fortnightly Review. Among the chapters 
in this book are: "Is American Masonry a Re- 
ligion?" "The Cod of American Freemasonry," 
"American Freemasonry and the Kabbalistic 
Jehovah," "American Freemasonry and the Bi- 
ble," "Masonic Morality," etc. Cloth, 433 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

GRAND LODGE VS. JUDGE WHITNEY. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of Bel. 
videre Masonic Lodge, No. 60 (Illinois), when S. 
L. Keith, a member of his lodge, murdered Ellen 
Slade. Judge Whitney, by attempting to bring 
Keith to justice, brought on himself the ven- 
geance of the lodge ; but he boldly replied to the 
charges against him, and afterwards renounced 
Masonry. 15 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF FREE- 
MASONRY 

As proved in court in the New Berlin trial. 
Also the letter of Hon. Richard Rush, to the 
Anti-Masonic Committee of York Co., Pa., 
May 4th, 1831. The New Berlin Trials began 
in the attempt of Freemasons to prevent pub- 
lic initiations by seceding Masons. These 
trials were held at New Berlin, Chenango Co., 
N. Y., April 13 and 14, 1831. General Augus- 
tus C. Welsh, Sheriff of the County, and oth- 
er adhering Freemasons swore to the- truth- 
ful revelation of the Oaths and Penalties. 
Single Copy, 10 cents. 

HISTORY OF THE ABDUCTION AND MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 
As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 25 
cents. 

HON. THURLOW WEED ON THE MORGAN 
ABDUCTION. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Captain Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal 
to Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario, the discovery of the body at Oak Orchard 
Creek and the two inquests thereon. Mr. Weed 
testifies from his own personal knowledge of these 
ihrilling events. This pamphlet also contains an 
mgraving of the monument and statue erected to 
the memory of the martyred Morgan at Batavia, 
N. Y., and unveiled in September, 1882, for which 
occasion Mr. Weed's statement was originally pre- 
pared 5 cents. 
EX-PRESiUENT JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. There are only a few of 
these books in print, and they are not in the best 
condition. They can be furnished, in paper, at 
50 cents a copy. 

VALANCE'S CONFESSION OF THE MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

This confession of Henry L. Valance, on« 
of the three Freemasons who drowned Mor- 
gan in the Niagara River, was taken from 
the lips of the dying man by Dr. Jorin C. 
Emery, of Racine County, Wisconsin, in 1848. 
The confession bears clear evidence of truth- 
fulness. Single copy, 10 cents. 



30 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUR: 



May, 1918 



WAS WASHINGTON A MASONI 

By President Charles A. Blanchard. This 
is the best contribution *yet writtGii on the 
question of Washington's relation to Free- 
masonry. 10 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO- 
PATRIOTS OPPOSED TO SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 

This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
statesmen and their testimonies vindicating them 
from any charge of adherence to secret societies. 
10 cents. 

WASHINGTON. 

What kind of a Freemason was he? 4 pages; 
postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents; a package of 75 
copies for 25 cents. 

STORIES OF THE GODS. 

By I. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mythology of Rome, Greece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia, Scandinavia, Africa and America, showing 
the relation and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 10 



MISCE LLAN EOUS 

MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
Wheaton College, President National Christian As- 
sociation, Ex-President Sabbath Association of 
Illinois, etc. 

A brief treatise for busy people and especially 
intended for ministers and teachers. 

Part first answers objections and clears away 
the obstacles to a candid consideration of the 
fundamental questions involved. Part second 
treats of Freemasonry as the key to the whole 
subject. Part third relates to subsidiary organ- 
izations, — industrial, insurance, temperance and 
other lodges. Part fourth considers important 
questions growing out of this discussion. 320 

FOLLY, EXPENSE AND DANGER OF SE- 
CRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, President of Whea- 
ton College. They may be rudely classified as 
religious ; e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfel- 
lowship, the Knights of Pythias, etc. ; political, as 
the Know-Nothings, Knights of the Golden Circle 
the Order of American Deputies, the Ku Klu£« 
Klan, the White League, etc. ; industrial, as tht 
unions of carpenters, bricklayers, conductors, en 
gineers, etc. ; insurance, as the Royal Arcanum, t\ 
Modern Woodmen, the Order of the Iron Hall, tli 
Order of United American Mechanics, etc. ; ai«i 
social, as the college fraternities. 5 cents. 

SECRET SOCIETIES ILLUSTRATED. 

Comprising the so-called "secrets" (the 
signs, grips, pass-words, emblems, etc.) of 
Freemasonry (Blue Lodge and to the thirteenth 
degree of the American Rite, and the Scottish 
Rite), Adoptive Masonry (the Eastern Star), 
Oddfellowship (Lodge, Encampment, and Re- 
bekah degrees), the Good Templars, Temple of 
Honor, United Sons of Industry, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Grange. Over 250 cuts; 99 
pages; paper cover, 35 cents. 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By a 
Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, and 
guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a sketch 
of the origin, history and character of the order, 
over one hundred foot-note quotations from stand- 
ard authorities, showing the character and teach- 
ings of the order, and an analysis of each degree 
by President J. Blanchard. This ritual corre- 
sponds exactly with the "Charge Books" furnished 
by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Cloth, $1.50; 
paper rover, $1.00, 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting RebekalTLodges, and Installation of Officers 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funera) 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA 

1899 Ritual as printed by J. W. Franks & 
Sons, Peoria, Illinois. This order is the fe» 
male auxiliary of the Modern "Woodmen of 
America. 10 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, Chiefs 
Degree ; with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 cent*; 
*>aper, 35 cents, 

EXPOSITION OF THE GRANGE 

Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated 
with engravings, showing lodge room, signs, 
signals, etc. 35 cents. 

FARMER S EDUCATIONAL AND CO-OP- 
ERATIVE UNION OF AMERICA 

Initiation ceremonies; obligation; final 
charge; chaplain introduced; burial cere- 
mony, etc., etc. 5 cents. 



A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a very excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience' 
ake from this order. 10 cents. 

GOOD TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED 

A full and accurate exposition of the de- 
grees of the Lodge, Temple and Council, with 
engravings showing the signs, grips, etc. 25 
cents. 

THE FORESTERS ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ilustrated ritual with Installa- 
tion Ceremonies of the United Order of Forest- 
ers, formerly known as the Independent Order 
of Foresters. 

Paper cover, 35 cents each. 

KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

The complete illustrated ritual and secrets of 
the order as used in 1880. 
Paper cover, 35 cents each. 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



ft] 



LIGHT ON THE LAST DAYS 

A book for the times! Being familiar studies 
in the dook of Ueveiauon. by president Charles 
A. Blanchaid, 1). D., of Wheaton College. We 
are approaching the times with which this book 
particularly deals. God has written these words 
for the help of His people in all ages, but they 
are of special impoitanee to us and those who 
succeed us. Cloth, 152 pages. Price 75 cents 
net. By mail 85 cents. 

SECRET SOCIETIES, ANCIENT AND MOD- 
ERN. 

Contents : The Antiquity of Secret Societies, 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason? 
Filmore's and Webster's Deference to Masonry in 
the United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustra- 
tion, The Conclusion. 50 cents. 

COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their customs, character, and efforts for their 
suppression. Containing the opinions of many 
college presidents, and others, and a full account 
of the murder of Mortimer Leggett. Compiled 
and edited by H. L. Kellogg. 25 cents. 

RONAYNE'S REMINISCENCES, 

Being an autobiography of his life and re- 
nunciation of Romanism and Freemasonry. 
(Mr. E. Ronayne is the author of the Handbook 
of Freemasonry; the Master's Carpet, Etc.) 
Cloth cover, 445 pages, price, 75 cents. 



FOR CHRISTIANS ONLY 



ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. Church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages; 5 cents. 

ODD-FELLOWSHIP JUDGED 

by its own utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By Rev. J. H. 
Brockman. Cloth, 50 cents; paper cover, 25 cents. 
This is an exceedingly interesting, clear dis- 
cussion of the character of Odd-Fellowship, in th& 
form of a dialogue. 

SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear 
presentation of the objections to all secret so- 
cieties, and to Masonry especially, that are appar- 
ent to all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
a most convincing argument against the Lodge. 
16 pages; 5 cents. 



SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the righf 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
TIES. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
of Christian churches to disfellowship secret so- 
cities. 10 cents. 



ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 
INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 
5 cents. 

THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST 

By Richard Horton. The Secret Empire 
Is a subject of prophecy. "Examine," says 
the author, "the thirteenth ehapter of Rere- 
lation." Gibbon's history of the Roman Em- 
pire is the history of the Beast; Rebold's 
"History of Freemasonry" is the history of 
the Image. Cloth, 60 centa. 
PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shiping Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10 
cents. 
SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor United Pres- 
byterian church. Four strong objections to 
Masonry, especially as an antichristian religion, 
justifying exclusion of adhering Masons from fel- 
lowship in the Christian church. 16 pages ; 5 cents. 

MASONIC SALVATION 

As taught by its standard authors. Compiled 
from standard Masonic works as proof of the 
proposition that "Freemasonry claims to be a 
religion that saves men from all sin, and purifies 
them for heaven." 20 cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THE 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District, Northwestern Iowa Conference 
of the M. E. church — a seceding Master Mason. 
5 cents. 

BETWEEN TWO OPINIONS. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of "Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc. Every one who loves to 
read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon the power of secret 
societies in politics, and the remedy. 389 pages ; 
cloth, 50 cents. 

THE MYSTIC TIE; 

Or Freemasonry a League with the Devil. 
This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Ind., for refusing to 
support a -»verend Freemason. 15 ^ep*3. 

MOODY CHURCH TESTIMONIALS. 

This valuable booklet contains the brief testi- 
monies as to organized secretism of nearly all 
the pastors, assistant pastors and pulpit sup- 
plies of the Moody Church, Chicago, during the 
first fifty years of its existence. 64 pages. 15 
cents. 

CONGREGATIONAL TESTIMONIES. 

Respecting the character and claims of secret 
societies. This book contains the testimonies of 
leading Congregationalists, East and West, with 
portraits of many well-known men. 55 pages : 
heavy paper cover, 15 cents. 

THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH, 

or A Woman's Victory. 
A story of a church in which the lodge influ- 
ence is felt in its prayer meetings and other fto 
tiv'ties. 2* pages and cover. Price 5 cent*. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

A discussion of their character and claims, 
by Rev. David MacDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and 
Rev. Edward Beecher. 96 pages; paper cc^er; 
15 cents each. 



32 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1918 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
Penalties ; Are Masonic Penalties Ever Enforced ? 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers; Disloyalty to Country; Our Re- 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
16 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

THE OPEN CONFESSION 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address on the rela- 
tion of the Christian, and especially the Chris- 
tian minister, to the secret oath-bound lodge. 
16 pages; postpaid 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

MY REASONS 

For Not Joining the Masonic Fraternity, by 
Rev. R. A. Torrey, D. D., Dean of the Bible 
Institute of Los Angeles. 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in Them? 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN " ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Other Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow ? 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
Fatherhood of God," Discussed and Refuted. 4 
cages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A package 
Of 75 for 25 cents. 
EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddfellowship? Ought Christians to 
Perform Acts of Beneficence and Charity as Odd- 
fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
man. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

ARE INSURANCE LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra= 
tlon. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 
BAPTIST TESTIMONIES. 

From Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D., Rev. A. 1. 
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WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

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The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
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MODERN PROPHETS of BAAL 

OR 

WATCHMEN on ZION'S WALLS 

By President C. A. Blanchard. 

This is a tract especially intended for ministers. The term Baalism in referring to 
Masonry is used figuratively. "If we say Lord to any one who is not God, then we 
are worshipers of Baal and if we, who are religious teachers, call any one Lord 
except the true God, then we are prophets of Baal.'* This tract, in addition to setting 
forth the real relation of Masonic ministers to a heathen system, also gives the reasons 
why Christian preachers become prophets of Baal. 

In the appendix there is a chapter on Masonic Theology, taken from Mackey's "Masonic 
Ritualist", the author being the well known Past General Grand High Priest of the General 
Grand Chapter of the United States. There is also A Word to Bible Students, by Dean 
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which are important in this connection. 

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I 



NotlM U RHdml- When you flnUm reading this magazine place a 1-cent stamp on thto notloe, hand mm 
r mmtUI emSoyee/and It will be placed in the handsof our soldiers or sailors at the front No wrapping. 
tress. A. S. BURLESON. Postmaster General. 




VOL. LI. 



CHICAGO, JUNE, 1918 



Number 



a 










t 



And, bating tbu$ 
cboscn our course 
let us renew our 
trust in God and go 
forward witDout 
fear and witD 
manlp hearts. 

Cincoln 




OFFICIAL ORGAN, NATIONAL CHRISTIAN AJTOCIATION 
, 10 CENT/ A COPY EJTABUJHED 1868 LQO A YEAR 



il 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
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piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
nt the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
Maraa 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Cover, Quotation from Lincoln Cover 

"Even This Shall Pass Away," poem, by 
Theodore Tilton 33 

Thrice-potent, Grand-elect, Perfect and 
Sublime 33 

Ohio State Sunday School Speakers 34 

Open All the Doors, Speak Out — Congre- 
' gationalist 34 

An Inquiry— Lodge Corner-stone Laying. . 35 

Form of Protest 35 

Illustration, Fisherman's Hut, New Or- 
leans 36 

The "Y" at Camp Cody, by James E. 
Phillips 36 

Mormonism — And the United States 
Courts, by Rev. Thos. D. Walker 38 

Organized Secrecy, by Bishop Burton R. 
Jones, in the Free Methodist 43 

A Seceder from Masonry 43 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 44 

The Lodgeville Church.— Chapter III, by 
Jennie L. Hardie 45 



The Law of God and the Law of the 

Lodge, by President Blanchard 48 

Masonic Creed and Mission — Quarterly 

Bulletin of Iowa 53 

Satan's U-Boat, by Prof. J. R. Millin. . . . 54 

News of Our Work : 

Annual Report of Rev. W. B. Stoddard 54 
Annual Report of Lizzie Woods Rober- 

son 56 

Annual Report of Rev. F. J. Davidson. 56 

Treasurer's Annual Report 57 

Report of Auditors 57 

Anti-Catholic Pro-Masonic "Menace," by 

John W. Kolb 58 

Monthly Report of Eastern Secretary.. 58 
"Manual of American College Fraterni- 
ties," by Baird 54 

Advertisements 60 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

GENERAL OFFICERS. 
President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Heemstra; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomas C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. KR- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Left- 
man, George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 
Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton, Calif. 
Eld. G. B. Crockett. Densott Ark. 



Vol. LI, No, 2. 



CHICAGO 



June, 1918 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

— Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have 1 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 



EVEN THIS SHALL PASS AWAY. 

"Once in Persia reigned a King, 
Who upon his signet ring 
'Graved a maxim true and wise, 
Which, if held before the eyes, 
Gave him counsel at a glance, 
Fit for every change and chance. 
Solemn words, and these are they: 
'Even this shall pass away.' 

"Trains of camels through the sand 
Brought him gems from Samarcand ; 
Fleets of galleys through the seas 
Brought him pearls to match with these. 
But he counted not his gain, 
Treasures of the mine or main ; 
'What is wealth?' the King would say; 
'Even this shall pass away.' 

"In the revels of his court 
At the zenith of the sport, 
When the palms of all his guests 
Burned with clapping at his jests, 
He, amid his figs and wine, 
Cried : 'Oh, loving friends of mine ! • 
Pleasure comes, but not to stay ; 
Even this shall pass away.' 

"Fighting on a furious field, 
Once a javelin pierced his shield : 
Soldiers with a loud lament 
Bore him bleeding to his tent; 
Groaning from his tortured side, 
'Pain is hard to bear,' he cried, 
'But with patience, day by day- 
Even this shall pass away.' 

"Towering in the public square, 
Twenty cubits in the air, 
Rose his statue, carved in stone. 
Then the King, disguised, unknown, 
Stood before his sculptured name, 
Musing meekly, 'What is fame? 
Fame is but a slow decay — 
Even this shall pass away.' 

"Struck with palsy, sere and old, 
Waiting at the gates of gold, 
Said he, with his dying breath : 
'Life is done, but what is death?' 
Then, in answer to the King, 
Fell a sunbeam on his ring, 
Showinc by a heavenly ray — 
'Even this shall pass away.' " 

—Theodore Tilt on (1835-1907). 



Thrice-potent, Grand-elect, Perfect 
and Sublime. Oh, my ! 

Nashua, N. H., April 24. — The 54th 
annual Fast Day convocation of the 
Scotish Rite Masons of New Hampshire 
began at Masonic Temple in this city 
this afternoon. The 14th grade, grand- 
elect perfect and sublime Mason, was 
conferred in full form and ceremony. 
Herbert E. Richardson, thrice potent 
master, was assisted by. the regular of- 
ficers of the lodge and 12 guards. 

Later the 15th and 16th degrees were 
communicated by George E. Danforth, 
sovereign prince, and other officers of 
Oriental Council, Princess of Jerusalem. 

This evening the 18th degree was con- 
fered by officers of Saint George Chap- 
ter of Rose Croix.— Reported to Boston 
Globe, April 25, 1918. 

A partial account of the Annual 
Meeting may be gleaned from this 
month's magazine. The rule is that all 
matter for the magazine must be in hand 
by the 20th of the preceding month. 
Our gathering was on the 22nd and 
hence we have done well to make a place 
for the reports found herein. The day 
was beautiful and the welcome extended 
to the Association by Rev. M. P. F. Doer- 
mann, pastor of the church where we 
met, was all that could be desired. The 
evening attendance was good but that 
of the day small. Mr. B. A. Pritchard 
of Coffey, Missouri and Mn S. R. Coy- 
ner, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and 
W. B. Stoddard, of Washington, D. C. 
were the only ones from any great dis- 
tance. The various sessions were inter- 
esting and helpful and the two addresses 
of the evening were unusually strong 
and interesting. The address of Presi- 
dent Blanchard was along similar lines 



34 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



to his article in this number. We are 
promised the address of Ex-President 
Hartzler for use in the July number of 
our magazine. 



We ask those who read the article on 
Mormonism in this number to answer 
this question : Why is Mormonism a 
thousand times more powerful and firm- 
ly rooted in this country today than it 
was a quarter of a century ago after its 
exposure and condemnation by the high- 
est judicial authority in the United 
States? Is there a closer affiliation to- 
day between the Mormon lodge and the 
Masonic lodge than has been heretofore 
suspected? With all the facts, set forth 
in the address by Rev. Dr. Wallace and 
more of the same character, before Con- 
gress, why was Utah admitted to state- 
hood and Mormons to membership in 
Congress and why are Mormon priests 
appointed today as chaplains in our 
army? Many Mormons are also Masons 
and therein is the hiding of their power. 
Eternal vigilance, faithfulness and sacri- 
fice is still the price of liberty. 



The State Sunday School Convention 
of Ohio, met on the 28th of May last in 
Springfield, and had as a speaker Prof. 
Walter S. Athearn of Maiden, Massa- 
chusetts. A copy of the Ohio Sunday 
School Worker states that he has at- 
tended twenty-seven state Sunday School 
conventions this year (1917). If what 
is said of this Prof. W. S. Athearn, who 
occupies a theological chair in the Boston 
University, is true we hope our Sunday 
school Associations have heard the last 
of him. Rev. G. Ridout in his tract 
"Methodism in Danger or Tainted 
Books," says on page twelve, "Walter S. 
Athearn rejects natural depravity ; the 
doctrine of the new birth ; * * *" An- 
other prominent worker in the Ohio 
Sunday School Convention from the 
Boston University is Prof. H. Augustine 
Smith, who is quoted in the February, 
191 8 number of the Ohio Sunday School 
Worker as making the following state- 
ments : "It is possible to be saved from 
Hell, without being saved from self." 
But the Word of God says, "Beloved, 
now are we the sons of God, and it doth 
not yet appear what we shall be; but we 



know that, when he shall appear, we 
shall be like him ; for we shall see him 
as he is." (I John 3:2). Prof. Smith: 
"Both Heaven and Hell will be full of 
sinners — the difference will be in their 
attitude." But we read in the Word : 
"And there shall in no wise enter into it 
any thing that defileth, neither whatso- 
ever worketh abomination or maketh a 
lie ; but they which are written in the 
Lamb's book of life." (Rev. 21:27). 

We do not really know what is meant 
by the statements of Prof. Smith re- 
ported above, which seem to be quoted 
with approval in the Ohio Sunday School 
Worker, but neither of them seem to us 
to be true. 



OPEN ALL THE DOORS, SPEAK OUT, 

111 deeds run to cover. The way to 
live a clear, clean, innocent life is to keep 
always in the light. The moment you 
detect yourself glancing sideways to see 
if any one is looking, that moment dis- 
trust the thing you are about to do. 
Turn on the light. Open every shutter 
and pull up every curtain. Set the doors 
ajar. Speak up loud and clear — no 
whispering. Call in somebody to see 
what you are doing. If your purpose 
stands these tests, it is wisdom and in- 
nocency ; not otherwise. "Open and 
aboveboard" is the only motto, and it is 
one that will carry you serenely through 
all sorts of sophistical temptations. Just 
simply take this for a watchword : "Will 
it stand the light?" You will not need 
to argue down your conscience ; you will 
not need to puzzle out "the rights of it." 
Ithuriel's spear was not more potent to 
detect falsehood than this simple, honest 
question that each of us is competent to 
ask and answer: "Will it stand the 
light?" If it will not, drop it. The 
great white light will soon be all around 
us. We need not fear that, if we set 
all our conduct now in the light of God's 
countenance. — Congregotionalist. 

The above editorial is taken from the 
very paper whose management refused 
a pay ad. of our "Christian Workers 
Tracts" because they turned the light en 
Masonry. "Open all the doors and 
speak out" indeed ! "What you do 
speaks so loud that I cannot hear what 
you say." 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



35 



AN INQUIRY. 

I desire information on a subject on 
which I hope you can help me. An 
answer in your magazine will be appre- 
ciated. 

We live in a village of less than one 
thousand inhabitants. There are three 
white churches : Friends, Presbyterians 
and Methodists. 

We are erecting a new High School 
building at a cost of $50,000 to $60,000. 
We have no Masonic lodge in this place, 
but a number of men here belong to the 

lodge in . When it came to 

laying the corner-stone of this new High 
School, a Masonic lodge was placed in 
charge of the ceremonies. Several of 
the taxpayers absented themselves be- 
cause of this. 

A few days afterward I passed the 
place and saw to my surprise a stone in 
which had been chiseled a Masonic sym- 
bol and also A. F. & A. M., and the num- 
ber of the Masonic lodge, etc. There 
was nothing to indicate it was our High 
School or had been built by the citizens 
of our town. 

Had the School Board a legal right to 
put such a stone in the wall? Can they 
be compelled to remove it? Some of us 
feel disgraced. 

Answer. 

Replying to your inquiry of the 19th, 
I wish to say that there should have been 
a protest circulated before the laying of 
the corner-stone and against its being 
laid by the Masons, the ground bring that 
it was a public building representing all 
the people and hence for any sect or 
lodge to perform such services was out 
of place. Such protests have succeeded 
in a number of instances. Masons seek 
opportunities for advertising Masonry 
and increasing its influence and prestige 
in communities, but their efforts to ad- 
vertise the lodge on corner-stones of 
public buildings can be thwarted, unless 
the community is almost wholly given 
over to lodge domination. 

You will doubtless find that the School 
Board invited the Masons, and not only 
that paid for the work on the corner- 
stone which perpetually advertises the 
lodge in the community, as though it had 
built the school, instead of the public. 

Probably you cannot bring any action 



that will compel the present School 
Board to remove the obnoxious adver- 
tisement on the corner-stone, or remove 
the corner-stone itself. The better way 
is to make it an issue in the next election 
of the School Board, and if they elect 
the right men, they will then either re- 
move that stone or at least cut out the 
insignia which the lodge has had placed 
upon the corner-stone. 

A public agitation and a faithful set- 
ting forth of the rights of the public in 
the matter, as against the usurpation of 
the lodge will be a very healthy move- 
ment for the community. 



Protest. 



To the 
of .... 



We, the undersigned citizens of 

, learning that it is proposed 

to lay the corner-stone of the High 
School with Masonic ceremonies, re- 
spectfully represent, that under our con- 
stitution and laws, no society, sect, or 
order is entitled to official or other public 
preferment over any other order, sect, 
or society ; and we, therefore, do earnest- 
ly protest that the secret society, to which 
it is thus proposed to delegate a work 
of public interest, should not be allowed 
such recognition, either in its rites, cere- 
monies or festivals, which are justly of- 
fensive to the great body of the Ameri- 
can people. 



Names. 



King Louis XIV, who had as court- 
preacher Archbishop Fenelon, found one 
Sunday that, instead of the usual crowd, 
there was no one in church besides him- 
self, his retinue and the preacher. "What 
does this mean ?" he asked the clergy- 
man. "Your majesty," answered Fene- 
lon, "I had published that you would 
not come to church today, in order that 
your majesty might see who serves God 
in truth and who Matters the king.'' — 
Selected. 



36 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



\ 




k 



\ 



r 



FISHERMAN'S HUT, NEW ORLEANS. 



THE "Y" AT CAMP CODY. 

JAMES E. PHILLIPS. 

Camp Cody, on the outskirts of Dem- 
ing, New Mexico, was established last 
summer to receive the federalized Na- 
tional Guard troops from the states of 
Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota, and North 
and South Dakota. The elevation of the 
camp is approximately forty-five hun- 
dred feet, so that, no matter how hot the 
days, the nights are cool. The vegeta- 
tion consists of sage brush, yucca plants, 
and now and then some species of low 
growing cactus. In other words it is the 



plain, ordinary American desert, and be- 
ing desert, it is inhabited by all those 
pleasant companions known as centi- 
pedes, scorpions, tarantulas, lizards, rat- 
tlers, ugly looking beetles and bugs of all 
descriptions. I am told by those who 
have had more experience in this region 
than I, that, during the warm weather, 
one is wise to make a search of the bed- 
ding before retiring, lest the presence 
of some of these creatures be ascertained 
at an inconvenient time. 

Those who claim to know, also say 
that if there were only sufficient mois- 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



37 



ture, this desert would blossom like the 
rose. Be that as it may, it is the fervent 
wish of everyone in camp that there 
might be sufficient moisture to prevent 
the sand storms which blow with vary- 
ing degrees of velocity, almost every day. 
If only the sand storms could be dis- 
pensed with, the bugs and the reptiles 
and the heat would not matter much. 

I was transferred from Camp Stan- 
ley, Texas, to Camp Cody, about March 
ist as there was a shortage of "Y." work- 
ers here at that time. The demands for 
Y. M. C. A. secretaries for the over- 
seas service, is a constant drain on all the 
camps. As an illustration of the changes 
going on, let me cite the fact that in this 
camp, employing over forty secretaries, 
there is not one left of the original force 
of last September. 

There are seven fully equipped Y. M. 
C. A. buildings in Camp Cody. And in 
addition to these, Secretaries are at- 
tached to the three base hospitals ; one is 
out at the remount station, one at the 
trenches, and one at the artillery range. 

One of the "Y" buildings adjoins what 
is known as the "Contact Camp." A 
contact is a soldier who had been exposed 
to some disease, such as mumps, scarlet 
fever, etc. They are sent to this section 
of the camp and put under quarantine 
for certain days to see if any disease ap- 
pears among them. If one shows symp- 
toms of disease, he is sent at once to the 
hospital. Considering the number of 
men in Camp Cody, the number held as 
"contacts," is very small. 

The Contact Camp is Used as a deten- 
tion camp, that is, recruits, and soldiers 
returning from furloughs, and units 
coming in from other camps, as well as 
units being transferred to other camps, 
are quarantined here certain days for 
medical observation. Thus it will be 
seen that the number of men in this Con- 
tact Camp is a varying quantity and that 
none of them remain very long. How- 
ever, the work here is important because 
the men have no place to go to except 
the "Y" and so we get a chance to min- 
ister to all except such as may be quaran- 
tined to their own tents or street. 

It must not be supposed that all the 
soldiers in an army camp "fall over them- 
selves" to get into the Y. M. C. A. build- 



ings. There are many soldiers, who, for 
reasons best known to themselves, never 
enter the "Y." Rut when one of these 
men comes into the Contact Camp, it is 
not long before he is in the "Y" here and 
getting first hand impressions. Many a 
soldier's prejudices against the Y. M. C 
A. have been broken down by actual con- 
tact with our organizations in this place, 
and he has gone out an enthusiastic 
booster for and sharer in its activities. 

The religious work in the Contact 
Camp has been peculiarly difficult be- 
cause of the ebb and flow of the men. 
Sometimes there have been only three or 
four score, while at others, there have 
been hundreds, and thousands. Often we 
are not able, for various reasons, to feel 
sure that we will have a reasonable au- 
dience for the Sabbath services, nor, in 
fact, that we will have any audience at 
all. More than once I have had to give 
up even my Sunday Bible class, because 
no one was on hand to attend. 

Rather an unusual succession of diffi- 
culties which I had on one Sabbath will 
illustrate what I have just said. Just be- 
fore Easter Sunday there was an influx 
of soldiers into this camp from Colorado. 
Among them were more than a hundred 
college men and there were something 
like thirty musical instruments of one 
kind and another in this company. There 
was a fine pianist and also a violinist. 
There were two men w r ho had been 
church soloists in Denver. We arranged 
a special musical program for Sunday 
morning and evening. Then word came 
that the men were to be mustered in dur- 
ing the forenoon, hence we had to change 
our musical service to the afternoon. 
When it was just time to begin one of the 
soldiers came to say that a clothing in- 
spection made it impossible for them to 
come before evening. I then rearranged 
the evening program so that we would 
have the best of the musical selections 
for that occasion. A little while before 
the evening service word came that one 
of these soldiers had come down with the 
measles and all were quarantined to their 
company street. I was not able to find 
any one who could play the piano and 
our musical program was off for sure. 

Nevertheless, the work here is not alt 
discouraging. The response of the men 



38 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



at the religious services has always been 
hearty. Some have found their Savior 
in this place and others who have forgot- 
ten their vows have renewed them. One 
group of soldiers got so interested in the 
Bible class which it was my pleasure to 
lead, that they sat for an hour and a half 
discussing the questions brought out, and 
then came back for further talk in the 
evening. 

The work in the other "Y" buildings 
in Camp Cody is not as difficult as at the 
one in the Contact Camp, because the 
men are not constantly changing as they 
are here. There are groups of men with 
whom the secretaries can do special 
work, and through whom they can reach 
others. 

At one of the young people's meetings, 
held on Sunday evening not long ago, 
and led by Evangelist J. C. Ludgate, a 
fellow townsman of mine, the question 
put to the men for answer was, "What 
has the army done for me?" 

The following replies are interesting as 
showing the influence of army discipline 
and the Y. M. C. A. on the lives of these 
twenty young Christians : 

1. "Taught me how to fight my bad 
habits and overcome them." 

2. "Taught me prompt obedience to or- 
ders." 

3. "Stopped me from many bad hab- 
its." 

4. "I am better physically, morally and 
spiritually." 

5. "I have met many refined, educated 
men I would never have met outside the 
army service." 

6. "Since joining the army I have 
found my Savior." 

7. "Taught me to stop grumbling and 
whining." 

8. "I have had to fight fierce tempta- 
tions and am a stronger and better man 
in every way." 

9. "I have never once failed to pray 
every night. It was hard at first, but I 
won out." 

10. "At every meal I have eaten in 
the army mess hall I have said grace. It 
was not easy to do, but God has given me 
courage." 

11. "I have had opportunities of hear- 
ing some of the world's greatest speak- 



ers since joining the army, and am better 
for it." 

12. "The army has made a man out of 
me physically and the Y. M. C. A. has led 
me to my Savior." 

13. "I was a drunkard, smoker and 
a wanderer, but the army has cured me 
of my bad habits." 

14. "The army has made me see the 
folly of evil habits, and I know I am a 
better man in every way since I became 
a soldier." 

15. "I have learned the value of 
prompt obedience to orders without 
whining since joining the army." 

16. "I am a better man in every way." 

17. "I have learned to love my Bible 
more since joining the army and through 
the 'Y.' " 

18. "I am better physically." 

19. "My army experience has helped 
me in fighting off bad companions." 

20. "I hate meanness more since join- 
ing the army and love the high and noble 
things of life." 



MORMONISM. 

The interest in the article on Mormonism 
in the last April number of Cynosure was 
so great that we have decided to republish 
an address given at one of our Conventions 
some years ago by Rev. Thos. D. Wallace, 
D. D., at that time pastor of the Eighth 
Presbyterian church of Chicago. — Editor. 

Fanatiscism, twin sister of supersti- 
tion and the daughter of ignorance and 
the devil, was married to fraud, her fos- 
ter brother. From this incestuous alli- 
ance a numerous progeny have peopled 
the world and in 1830 a child of their 
old age was born and baptised Mormon- 
ism. Joe Smith stood god- father for 
this child and became the accepted 
prophet of its followers. 

The absurd claim made by this impos- 
ter that through supernatural means 
there was discovered to him golden 
plates containing the sacred records of 
the past engraved upon them, and that 
he was divinely assisted to translate the 
same by means of Uritn and Thummim, 
and that these records of a divine rev- 
elation run back to the time of the tower 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



39 



of Babel — I will not tarry to refute. To 
recite the puerile story is its best refuta- 
tion with intelligent and honest people. 
Indeed, if it were not for the fact of 
Mormonism and its colossal power and 
its staying qualities in spite of all forces 
arrayed against it, I would feel like mak- 
ing apology for any reference to these 
absurd and childish tales touching its 
origin. 

It claims to date its origin from the 
event of the building of the Tower of 
Babel and that, if I mistake not, leaves 
the Masonic order a comparatively mod- 
ern institution by its own confession. 
Logically Mormonism would seem some- 
how to be associated in its origin with 
that sort of thing for, as I understand 
it, that unfortunate enterprise though an 
ambitious piece of masonry for that age, 
meant opposition to the wilt of God. 
There is evidence also, I think, that idol- 
atrous ideas were connected with that 
tower. The word "Babil" in Hamitic 
language means the "Gate of God," 
which suggests the thought of worship, 
and the comparison of some modern 
heathen temples. But Babil of the 
Hamitic dialect when its letters are 
transformed to the Semitic, has an en- 
tirely different meaning. It means "con- 
fusion." Hence that which was meant 
for a Gate of God — Babil — became 
Babel — a babble — confusion. 

But soberly, whatever the precise date 
or particular event out of which Mor- 
monism grew in ignorance and arro- 
gance, in conceit and confusion, in the 
satanic impudence with which it outfaces 
the world ; in turning sacraments to sen- 
sualities, in covering the most revolting 
and unspeakable crimes with the cloak 
of a celestial marriage ; in putting dark- 
ness for light, bitter for sweet, evil for 
good and error for truth, I will say that 
it seems to be the legitimate child of the 
spirit which built the Tower of Babel, 
and that by heredity it holds all the worst 



traits of its ancient parentage. A mis- 
sionary at Salt Lake city once analyzed 
it thus:— 

"Mormonism Is Made Up of Twenty Parts: 
"Take eight parts Diabolism; three 
parts of animalism taken from Moham- 
medanism ; one part bigotry taken from 
old Judaism; four parts cunning and 
treachery of Jesuitism ; two parts Thug- 
ism from India; and two parts Arnold- 
ism, then shake the mixture over the fire 
of animal passion and throw in the forms 
and ceremonies of the Christian religion, 
and you will have this system in its true 
component elements." 

Its appeal to the religious sentiment ; 
its professed revelations from Heaven ; 
its promise of a sensual paradise here- 
after as the consummation of fidelity in 
the earthly and animal relations ; its cov- 
ering the vilest passions with, the cloak 
of religious worship, baptizing not only 
pagan impurity but sanctifying to their 
notions on the altar of devotion to God, 
the lusts of men amid the incense of 
shame, it would seem incredible that 
anyone should treat these matters seri- 
ously. But the institution constitutes a 
problem which confronts us now and has 
for sixty years refused to yield to the 
plans of the politicians, although I am 
glad to say it shows signs of strangula- 
tion. 

During these six decades of its natural 
life the chief elements in its rapid in- 
crease seem to have been : 

i. It is virtual separation from the 
Christian civilization of America. 

2. Its immense foreign additions of a 
type to be easily assimilated to their no- 
tions. 

3. It has been hermetically sealed by 
the ini'incible oaths of secrecy, which 
closed at once the doors of the Endow- 
ment House and the lips of the victim 
of lust. 

God's sunlight and the pure air of 
Heaven will cleanse the foulest and most 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



loathsome prison or person when prop- 
erly applied. Thank the Lord the doors 
of the Endowment House have been car- 
ried off by the Samson of the Supreme 
Court; and a sweeping cyclone of testi- 
mony from many witnesses has unroofed 
it, and the augean stables have been 
washed by a stream of truth, which has 
not only swept away the filth from the 
surface, but has flushed the sewers of 
Salt Lake's secret oath-bound organiza- 
tion and carried the fraud and filth of 
her moral shame into the desert. Gen- 
tile aggressiveness and Christian fidelity 
have seized the reins, to hold or drive the 
chariot of progress as the Christian 
conscience of the people shall determine. 
The Christian churches and schools 
which already have their coronation in 
the victory recently won, are glad and go 
on their way rejoicing. They have en- 
dured all things ; they hope all things. 

Says Dr. McNiece : "The rapidity with 
which important events succeed each 
other in the capital city of Utah in con- 
nection with the overthrow of Mormon- 
ism, makes it an unusually interesting 
places to live in or read about. In No- 
vember last the public interest was 
aroused by the Endowment House ex- 
posure in the Third District Courts by 
the important decision of Judge Ander- 
son, that no one who has been through 
the horrible Endowment House, and 
still maintains his. connection with the 
Mormon organization, is entitled to 
naturalization as an American citizen. 

This is good reading, even when 
found in The Deserei News, and is the 
harbinger of brighter days. 

We need not go into the matter par- 
ticularly touching the early close associa- 
tion and suspicious connection of Mor- 
monism with Masonry for it is known 
that in the early days of Nauvoo (Illi- 
nois) there were Masonic lodges com- 
posed exclusively of Mormons, work- 
ing under special dispensation (of 



Grand Lodge of Illinois) ; and the sta- 
tistics show that there was a time when 
they had a majority of members of that 
order in the State. Besides there is evi- 
dence to show that some of the Mormon 
and Masonic work was so intermingled 
that it was difficult to tell "which from 
tother," the Mormons being the judges. 
It is quite enough to know that the tap- 
root out of which the poisonous stem 
and malignant and deadly fruits have 
come, was and is the common root of an 
Iron-Clad, Oath-Bound Secret Organization 
with pains and penalties for revealing se- 
cret mysteries. Such and such like or- 
ganizations being, I think, disloyal alike 
to Christ, to the home, the church and 
the state. 

It is this phase of the Mormon in- 
famy, which the November (1889) trial 
in the city of Salt Lake uncovered in all 
its hideous, leprous loathsomeness so 
that it stands in its naked deformity and 
devlishness, exposed to the withering 
contempt of our civilization. 

The case was that of John Moon and 
others, in the matter of their application 
to become citizens of the United States. 
The charge was made by those who ob- 
jected to their application for citizen- 
ship, that they were members of the 
Mormon Church, and that they had gone 
through the Endowment House of that 
church, and there had taken an oath or 
obligation incompatible with the oath of 
citizenship. In the Deseret Weekly 
News, the official organ of the Mormon 
Church, under date November 23d and 
30th, 1889, may be found the proceed- 
ings of the trial, evidence, etc., as 
brought out in the District Court for 
the Third Judicial District of the Ter- 
ritory of Utah, Judge Thomas J. An- 
derson. Many witnesses testified to hav- 
ing gone through the Endowment House, 
and to the fact that a penalty was at- 
tached for revealing certain mysteries of 
the Endowment House. One specifically 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



41 



says that the penalty of death was at- 
tached for revealing these Masonic — 
mark the word — Masonic ceremonies. 
One cannot gather whether the witness 
used the term "Masonic" in this connec- 
tion to designate the actual character of 
the ceremonies, making it thus synonym- 
ous with Mormon ; or whether he used 
it wittingly for the supposed weight it 
might have with the Judge in securing 
exemption from making damaging testi- 
mony by exposing secrets. Witnesses 
testified that penalties were also attached 
to revealing signs, grips, passwords, etc. ; 
and a number of witnesses agreed that 
the penalty for disclosing these "secret 
ceremonies" was "having the tongue cut 
out," "throat cut from ear to ear," "right 
hand forfeited," being "disembowled," 
"dissected," etc. 

Then there were unwilling witnesses 
who, when hotly pressed, declined to an- 
swere concerning the secrets of the En- 
dowment House ; said the endowments 
were for future use, and were not to 
be made public. In this they "were like 
the Masonic ceremonies," said the wit- 
ness. Again and again witnesses took 
refuge and sought escape from the 
troublesome inquest of the court by say- 
ing that those matters and ceremonies 
were moral and religious rites to which 
the United States government had no 
right, and they stood stubbornly refus- 
ing to let in the light on these secret 
and scandalous ceremonies, — all the 
while protesting that there was nothing 
in them whatever that conflicted with 
good and honest citizenship and loyalty 
to flag, country, and constitution. 

There is quite enough of this to con- 
clusively show that the safeguard and 
shelter of this 

"Abomination of Desolation" 
was, and is, the secret oath-bound char- 
acter of the institution, buttressed by the 
most brutal penalties which the heart of 
fiend or fanatic can conceive. 



Having gone over the evidence some- 
what fully as adduced before the court 
from all classes of witnesses to sustain 
the case, and having carefully reviewed 
the opinion of the learned Judge Ander- 
son, as given in the Deseret News' of 
Dec. 7, 1889, it will be evident that loy- 
alty to the Mormon Church and loyalty 
to the United States government at tlu 
same time, by the same person, is an 
impossibility. 

In closing his opinion, which occupied 
an hour in reading, and goes over the 
whole proceedings of the Federal Court 
in this matter of the naturalization of 
Mormons, the Judge says : 

"The Mormon Church teaches : 

1st. That it is the actual and veritable king- 
dom of God upon earth — not in its fullness, 
because Christ has not yet come to rule in 
person; but for the present he rules through 
the priesthood of the church, who are his 
vicegerents upon earth. 

"2d. That this kingdom is both a tem- 
poral, and a spiritual kingdom, and should 
rightly control, and is entitled to the highest 
allegiance of men. 

"3d. That this kingdom will overthrow the 
United States and all other governments, 
after w r hich Christ will reign in person. 

"4th. That the doctrine of 'Blood Atone- 
ment' is of God, and that under it certain 
sins,, which the blood of Jesus Christ cannot 
atone for, may be remitted by shedding the 
blood of the transgressor. 

"5th. That polygamy is a command of 
God, which if a member obeys he will be 
exalted in the future life above those who 
do not. 

"6th. That the Congress of the United 
States has no right under the Constitution to 
pass any law in any manner interferring with 
the practice of the Mormon religion, and that 
acts of Congress against polygamy and dis- 
franchising those who practice it are unwar- 
ranted interferences with their religion. 

"Can men be made true and loyal citi- 
zens by such teachings, or are they like- 
ly to remain so, surrounded by such in- 
fluences? Will men become attached to 
the principles of the Constitution of the 
United States when they hear the gov- 



42 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



ernment constantly denounced as tyran- 
nical and oppressive? It would be as 
unreasonable to expect such a result as 
it would be to expect grapes from thorns 
or rigs from thistles. It has always been, 
and still is, the policy of this government 
to encourage aliens, who in good faith 
come to reside in this country, to become 
citizens ; but when a man of foreign 
birth comes here and joins an organiza- 
tion which, although professedly re- 
ligious, requires of him an allegiance 
paramount to his allegiance to the gov- 
ernment; an organization that impiously 
and blasphemously claims to be the king- 
dom of God, and to control its members 
under his immediate direction ; and yet 
teaches and practices a system of morals 
shocking to Christian people everywhere 
and under which the marriage of a man 
to two or more sisters or to a mother 
and a daughter is sanctioned; an organ- 
ization which sanctions blood atonement 
as a means of grace, and murder as a 
penalty for revealing the secrets of its 
ceremonies; and which for nearly half 
a century has refused to acknowledge 
the supremacy of the United States or 
render obedience to its laws, — it is time 
for the courts to pause and inquire 
whether such an applicant should be ad- 
mitted to citizenship. 

"The evidence in this case establishes 
unquestionably that the teachings, prac- 
tices and aims of the Mormon church 
are antagonistic to the government of 
the United States, utterly subversive of 
good morals and the well-being of so- 
ciety, and that its members are actuated 
by a feeling of hostility toward the gov- 
ernment and its laws ; and therefore an 
alien who is a member of said church is 
not a fit person to be made a citizen of 
the United States. 

"(Signed) Thos. J. Anderson, 
"Associate Justice Supreme Court 

and Acting Judge Third Judicial 

District/' 



This, to my mind, is the best reading 
I have seen in many a day. The Judge 
swings a scythe and cuts a swath right 
through the swamp and marsh of for- 
eignism and alienism, of secretism and 
disloyalty which not only lays low the 
reeds and cat-tails of Mormon treason, 
but cuts also on either side some of the 
rankest and most pestilential weeds of 
Jesuitism and Clan-na-gaelism. Let there 
be here between these seas and under 
these stars no room for any foreign flag 
or for any citizenship which, with mental 
reservation in its oath to us, owes al- 
legiance first and foremost to foreign 
prince or pojpe, to any other power, 
political or. eccelesiastical, than to the 
one starry flag, or the constitution for 
which that flag forever stands. 

This trial with its evidence, its argu- 
ments and its opinion rendered by Judge 
Anderson, marks an era in this Mormon 
problem, — it is the thin edge of the 
wedge which is to cleave wide open the 
toughened trunk of this iniquity ; already 
the light shines along the plane of cleav- 
age to the rotten heart of this upas tree : 
when shivered into fragments we will 
burn the refuse and scatter the ashes 
over the alkali plains, or tramp it into a 
roadway along which the chariot of 
twentieth century civilization shall roll 
in triumph. 

Only two weeks after the trial expos- 
ing the Endowment House business had 
been ended came the report of the grand 
jury, published in the Salt Lake Tribune, 
Dec. 15th, 1889. This was another ex- 
posure of favoritism, extravagance and 
fraud practiced by the Mormon officials 
for the preceding five years. The report 
summed up, shows that the city and 
county officials have for years been plun- 
dered without mercy by Mormons who 
occupy high positions in the church, and 
who have kept themselves constantly out 
of breath warning their people against 
the incoming Americans and urging them 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



43 



to vote against the American ticket for 
fear the Americans would use the pub- 
lic offices to defraud the people. Fol- 
lowing these events in startling swift 
succession came the Idaho law disfran- 
chising Mormon- Polygamists, and de- 
clared by the United States Supreme 
Court to be constitutional. And then, a 
little later (Feb. ioth), the overwhelm- 
ing defeat of the Mormon power in the 
municipal election in the city of Salt 
Lake. These two events show us the 
crest of the wave in the conflict between 
American civilization and Mormonism. 
The crisis has come at last in this con- 
flict — the culmination is reached when 
the conspiracy of all most wholesome and 
virile moral forces swell the flood of 
righteous indignation against this out- 
rage until it shall be swept from off the 
face of the fat valleys of the West, and 
from under the shelter of our flag. 



ORGANIZED SECRECY. 

BISHOP BURTON R. JONES. 

The Free Methodist church has ever 
regarded organized secrecy as a brazen 
foe to our most sacred institutions. The 
wdiole brood of secret orders is contrary 
to the spirit and teaching of the gospel 
which requires us to "renounce the hid- 
den things of dishonesty," and "have no 
fellowship with the unfruitful works of 
darkness, but rather reprove them," to 
"walk as children of the light," and to 
"provide things honest in the sight of all 
men." With persistent and unfaltering 
purpose the church should advance upon 
this avowed enemy. 

Freemasonary has been properly 
styled the "parent of secretism." It is the 
sworn enemy of all righteousness. We 
believe it to be, as one has styled it, 
"a curse to society, a blasting mildew on 
the church and a combination of ele- 
ments destructive to human and religious 
freedom." Those who remain under 
the dominion of such an institution will 
be exposed to divine wrath. 

According to Masonic principles, the 
drunkard, the skeptic, the profane, the 



Christian, the gospel minister, are all 
"hail fellows well met." Under the pre- 
tense of uniting under one head, the 
"common brotherhood of man," it 
places Mohammedanism and heathen- 
ism on a level with Christianity. ( >ne 
has said, "It makes the compass and the 
square emblems of universal moral rec- 
titude, and receives or rejects the liible 
at pleasure." 

Organized secrecy is a hard master. 
His service leads into temptations and 
snares, and into many "deceitful and 
hurtful lusts which drown men in de- 
struction and perdition." 

Every organized movement for the 
suppression of evil should be open and 
free. Even secret temperance societies 
are decidedly objectionable. They arc 
wrong in principle and liable to many 
abuses in their practical operations. The 
foe must be met in open field. The guise 
of secrecy must be thrown off and all 
lovers of virtue, sobriety and good order 
must unite in an open charge against this 
destructive and soul-damning vice. 

But our success is in the help of the 
living God. Human agencies alone are 
inadequate to the great task. Prayers, 
sermons, votes, and every legitimate 
means at our command, accompanied 
zvith faith in the Infinite Cod, should be 
employed for the overthrow of this pow- 
erful enemy. It is the duty of the church 
to do all in its power to suppress this 
giant evil so ruinous to all who come un- 
der its influence. 

The Free Methodist church is com- 
mitted to let God use her to His glory 
in the overthrow of Satan's kingdom 
and the spread of the pure and undetiled 
religion of Jesus Christ. — The Free 
Methodist, February 26th, K)i8. 



A SECEDER. 

A friend writing to the National 
Christian Association under the date of 
April 8th, iqi8, from Altruas, Florida, 
says: "I believe that yours is a great 
work. I was an eight degree Mason un- 
til a few months ago. We do not get 
the truth in the lodge in regard to its 
history, etc. I was Master of a lodge in 
Illinois in 1912." (Signed) E. F. 
Boewe, D. D. S. 



44 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



dJofjtt (JPmttrg Afcama — &tuti)|Sr£ aft? ttt luttefc States 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

THE SOLEMN PROTESTATIONS OF 

ADHERING MASONS PROVEN 

PREVARICATIONS. 

Washington, 23 December, 1832. 
To James Moorhead, Esq., Mercer, Pa. 

Sir: — Mr. Banks, the worthy repre- 
sentative of your district, delivered to 
me your friendly letter of the 26th of 
last month. 

I have, since the commencement of the 
session of Congress, regularly received 
the numbers of the Mercer Luminary, 
and have observed with pleasure the 
zeal and assiduity with which it dis- 
seminates the light of Antimasonry. To 
that cause I am devoted, because I be- 
lieve it to be the cause of pure morals 
and of truth. 

Until the murder of Morgan I had 
very little knowledge of the institution 
of Freemasonry, except as an occasional 
witness of its childish pageantry and the 
mock solemnity of its processions. These 
I believed to be harmless, and I gave 
willing credit to their boastful profes- 
sions of benevolence and charity. 

Very soon after the Morgan catas- 
trophe, however, the Masonic obligations 
were disclosed to me in the escape of 
Col. William King, from the pursuit of 
justice, in the territory of Arkansas. I 
saw their operation without being able 
to punish the offender or even judicially 
to authenticate the offense. King es- 
caped by the connivance of Masonic ob- 
ligations paramount to the laws of the 
land. He re-appeared afterward upon 
the theater of his guilt, and, as you 
know, died suddenly on the disclosing of 
facts which he had flattered himself were 



hidden from every person under the 
canopy of heaven, without the pale of 
Masonic oaths and penalties. 

Other evidences of the practical effect 
of Masonic obligations soon revealed 
themselves to me in the forms of secret 
slander and perjury. But of the multi- 
tude of atrocious crimes committed, first 
in the conspiracy which terminated in 
the murder of Morgan, and for five 
years afterward in baffling and defeat- 
ing the laws of the state in their efforts 
to bring the murderers to justice, I had 
a very imperfect idea till the publication 
of Col. Stone's book. 

There remained yet not any reason- 
able doubt, but some deficiency of evi- 
dence — with regard to the essential, in- 
herent and indelible viciousness of the 
Masonic obligations — in the solemn pro- 
testations of the adhering Masons, that 
those obligations were falsely repre- 
sented in the books of Bernard and 
Avery Allyn; in the bold asseverations 
that no such oaths, obligations, and pen- 
alties existed; and in reiterated declara- 
tions couched in delusive generalties, 
that they had never taken any oath or 
obligation inconsistent with their duties 
to their country or their religion, but 
always without disclosing what were the 
terms of those which they had taken. 
The investigation by a committee of the 
legislature of Rhode Island finally 
brought out the obligations of ten de- 
grees, as avowed to be practiced in the 
lodges, chapters, and encampments of 
that state. It exposed them in their 
hideous deformity, and took from the 
defenders of Masonry their last refuge 
of prevarication. 

It was to show them in their naked 
nature, divested of all sophisticated ex- 
planations, and all mental equivocations, 
that I wrote the four letters on the En- 
tered Apprentice's oath, which you have 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



45 



republished in the Luminary. I am 
happy that they have met your appro- 
bation. 

I am, with much respect, 
Your friend and fellow-citizen, 

John Quincy Adams. 



THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH. 

BY JENNIE L. HARDIE. 
CHAPTER III 

One day, not long after the prayer 
meeting referred to, Mr. Trowley flushed 
with rapid walking, entered the Thomp- 
son kitchen with the hurried question, 
"Have you seen this?" at the same time 
unfolding a copy of the last edition of 
the Lodgemlle Weekly. 

Mr. Thompson, to whom the question 
was addressed, adjusted his spectacles 
and, glancing at the paragraph indicated, 
read, first silently, then aloud — 

" 'Astonishing News! The Lodgeville 
Weekly prayer-meeting (or part of it) rec- 
ommends all Christians to separate them- 
selves from the Lodge! Old Get-up-and-get 
maintains such an action on their part to be 
the only thing that will insure success to the 
church, from a religious point of view. 

" 'Sister Pure-at-heart thinks so, too ; so 
does Sister Look-into-things. Brother Reli- 
able says Amen. Question will probably be 
determined at the next meeting.' 

"This extraordinary communication was 
found on our doorsill this morning. We give 
it for what it is worth. — Ed." 

"Well, Thompson?" 

"Oh, pshaw !" returned that individ- 
ual, laughing ; "who do you suppose 
wrote that?" 

"You tell. Uncle Job, maybe." 

"Not he. Who in the world" — and an- 
other hearty laugh finished the sentence. 

"But that's not all. Do you know Job 
wants to have the church next Friday 
evening for a lecture on Freemasonry? 
What do you thing of that?" 

"No!" exclaimed Mr. Thompson, in 
disgust. 

"Of course he won't get it. I'm sorry 
Job's got such ideas into his head. He'll 
make a terrible muss, I'm afraid, and all 
for nothing. Now I have charity for 
those who don't look at these things 
just as I do. That's what I told him 
when he and Gillman had such a 'set to' 
after prayer meeting Thursday night, 
but you ought to have heard how he 



turned on me. Oh, well, Job's a good 
man, a real well-meaning man, but a 
leetle set in his way, and then he's al- 
ways for digging into things like this. 
Now I'm not a Mason myself, as you 
know, but I'm willing other folks should 
be if they want to. Oh, well," he added, 
in a tone of resignation, "if he's deter- 
mined to raise a fuss I don't see as any 
one can hinder him ; but as for the lec- 
ture he has in view, I don't suppose he 
can get out a corporal's guard to that. 
Beats all, though, what makes Homely 
favor it so much. He generally follows 
after 'those things that make for peace,' 
as the Bible says, and I'm astonished 
that he should discuss the question in 
the way he does. He actually told the 
Elder it was his firm conviction that no 
intelligent Mason could be a Christian, 
and exhorted him to give up the lodge. 
I didn't hear the whole of the confab, 
but he closed it up with prayer. Now 
wa'n't that pretty hard? Of course the 
Elder defended the lodge, and it was 
plain to be seen his feelings were con- 
siderably stirred up. I'm sorry for him. 
He said it was dreadful to see his little 
flock so disturbed all of a sudden. I 
hope he can depend on me," added the 
speaker, as he took up his hat to depart. 

"He can that," observed Daniel 
Thompson under his breath— from a cor- 
ner where he sat shelling corn — "he can 
that, to be a straddle-the-fence fellow to 
the last." 

"Well, father?" questioned Mrs. 
Thompson. 

The husband sat for some minutes ab- 
sorbed in deep thought before he replied : 
"Oh, pshaw!" It won't amount to any- 
thing. There's nobody but Dee and 
Homely" — 

"And — the Lord," suggested his wife. 

"You think so, Tilda?" 

"I assuredly do, Timothy. I wish you 
would study up the question. I don't 
believe you would remain in the lodge a 
day longer if you comprehended its true 
inwardness." 

"That's complimentary — very," ob- 
served her husband dryly. "After a 
twenty years' membership, I am recom- 
mended by my wife to find out what 
Masonry is." 

"Don't get out of patience, father," 



46 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



returned the little woman softly. "You 
know there were five or six years dur- 
ing which you never attended a meeting 
of the lodge. And then, don't you think 
it possible for you to have met with 
them as you did, semi-occasionally, with- 
out once even to yourself, questioning 
the right or wrong of any oath or obli- 
gation required of you?" 

Mr. Thompson made no reply, but sat 
with folded arms looking out of the win- 
dow at the broad acres spread out in the 
view therefrom. His wife arose and 
procuring a volume from a well-filled 
rack in the family sitting-room she 
opened it at a selected passage and placed 
it upon his knee with the request that he 
would read that. 

Mechanically he adjusted his specta- 
cles and glanced at the place indicated, 
then a look, half of anger, came over 
his face and he pushed it from him. In 
a moment, however, he again took it up 
and read half a page, when he thrust it 
aside, muttering "fiddlesticks !" The 
second time he took it up, turned over a 
few leaves, read the heading of the chap- 
ters, scanned the index and a catalogue 
of anti-Masonic publications, then open- 
ing at the first chapter he began to read 
as one interested. 

Over the face of his wife who had 
watched every movement, came a smile 
of satisfaction, and laying aside the gar- 
ment upon which she was at work, re 
paired to her closet which had become 
of late an oft-visited place, and offered 
a psalm of thanksgiving that orte wish 
of her heart was being realized. "I know 
he will listen," spoke the happy woman. 
"He will revive his work in this place. 
He will cast out these 'abominations that 
work desolation' from his church so he 
may work through it. Our children will 
be saved." 

Meanwhile Mr. Thompson read on and 
on. Neither the summons to the even- 
ing meal nor afterward the suggestion 
that the time for retiring had come were 
heeded by him. The last clause of the 
last chapter had met his eye when he 
laid it down, with the remark, "I won- 
der if she's got any more of them!" 

It began to be noised about town that 
the curious little paragraph in the paper 
meant something after all — that the 



prayer-meeting folks were actually 
thinking of sending off for an anti-Ma- 
sonic lecturer to zvork some of the de- 
grees ! 

It reached the ears of a group of men 
lounging about the billiard hall, filled 
(as always) with the odor of liquor and 
tobacco. 'Let them do it if they dare!" 
spoke Mr. Vallance, as he threw the 
stump of a cigar on the floor with un- 
necessary force. "We'll give them an 
argument they can't gainsay. Just let 
them try it !" The others of the party 
echoed his words, and who shall say 
that the fiends in hell did not exult over 
them? 

It was heard also in the Rees house- 
hold, where the verdict was, "Masonry 
must be a good thing or such men as 
Elder Kemp and Tim Thompson would 
not have anything to do with it." 

In the home of the Thompsons little 
was said, except on one occasion when 
Debbie repeated to her sister a rumor 
communicated to her by Tom to the ef- 
fect that Mr. Vallance had left behind 
him a wife and family in the far eastern 
town from which he came. 

"Don't be mad at me Carrie," she said, 
"I thought I ought to tell you." 

"Nonsense," interrupted the other. "1 
don't believe a word of it ! Isn't Mr. 
Vallance a Mason, and isn't that surety 
that his character is good ? Haven't you 
heard Elder Kemp emphasize an asser- 
tion by saying, 'On the word of a Mason 
and a Christian?' Do you suppose fath- 
er and Elder Kemp and such men would 
belong if it wasn't a good institution?" 

"I — don't — know," returned the other. 
Everybody knows Mr. Homely is a true 
Christian, and he is just as anxious as 
Uncle Job to have it preached against. 
Of course father is a Mason, but — " and 
Debbie stopped there unable to reconcile 
the two ideas. 

Uncle Job found but little difficulty in 
gaining consent to use the church for an 
anti-Masonic meeting. 

This was a matter of surprise and 
comment to many persons, both in and 
outside of its membership. Had Mrs. 
Homely or Mrs. Thompson been ques- 
tioned as to the wherefore, they would 
probably refer the inquirer to a promise 
found in Matt. 18:19. With few ex- 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



47 



ceptions, Uncle Job, who was a general 
favorite notwithstanding his "up and 
down way," had received the answer, "I 
don't care. You may have it for all 
me ;" and so the meeting was arranged 
for Friday evening. 

During the day conspicuous posters 

met the eye in every available place, 

which read as follows: 

Lecture 

at the church tonight ! 

Subject: 

MASONRY A FOE TO THE CHURCH OF 
CHRIST ! 

Come Everybody ! 

As Uncle Job was returning home, 
paste-bucket in hand, he remarked to M17. 
Homely, with whom he stopped a few 
minutes to chat, "There! I reckon I've 
done all I could. I only hope they won't 
tear 'em off till they're read. This meet- 
in' is a goin' to be the beginnin' o' bet- 
ter days. I feel it in my bones. I'll jes' 
step in an' recommend Elder Lowly to 
keep a stiff upper lip when the howlin' 
begins, fur from the appearance o' 
things it's a goin' to be loud. The 
saloonies promise us all sorts o' fun. but 
as I tell 'em 'a barkin' dog never bites.' 
Mark says to me this mornin', says he, 
'You ain't a goin' up there tonight with- 
out bein' armed?' But I says to him, 
T'd ruther have the protection that the 
prayers o' them 'ere wimmin that's agoin' 
to pray in the vestry through the lecture 
'11 bring me than all the six-shooters in 
the state.' I tell you Brother Homely, 
the Lord is agoin' to right this 'ere bat- 
tle — now you see !" 

"Y^ou think there will be a good turn- 
out?" 

"Course there will. What made the 
house full last night at prayer meetin' 
if they wa'n't expectin' suthin' be said 
about this 'ere? Dreadful sorry Elder 
Kemp won't lend a hand, but that can't 
be helped as I see. We've got to hand- 
spike this 'ere thing that's a blockadiu' 
the track, Elder or no Elder, or the old 
engine '11 stand stock still as it's been a 
doin' these years" — and Uncle Job sat 
down his bucket and went in quest of 
the lecturer to satisfy himself that that 
person's courage was adequate for com- 
ing emergencies. 

Evening came. Long before the ap- 



pointed time for the lecture to begin. 
every seat in the church was filled. Out- 
side the door stood a group of men and 
boys popularly termed "rowdies," among 
whom was Mr. Vallance and Uncle Job's 
stalwart son, Mark. In answer to a 
question asked by one of the party, Mr. 
Vallance said, "Yes, it's all right. I got 
that fool Dan Thompson to get a lot on 
hand, and they're around somewhere." 

Mark Dee raised his eyebrows a little, 
and presently remarked, "You don't 
want to go to raisin' Ned tonight, boys. 
Let 'em have it all their own way;" to 
which piece of advice no answer being 
vouchsafed he entered the house, and 
beckoning Daniel Thompson to his side 
whispered something in his ear. The 
answer was evidently satisfactory, for 
Mark Dee with difficulty restrained him- 
self from laughing aloud. 

Still the people came. Farm wagons 
stood at the door loaded with passengers 
representing districts rive, seven and 
even nine miles distant. Presently a lit- 
tle stir bespoke the arrival of the speak- 
er, a calm, quiet man, in appearance very 
like Mr. Homely, who accompanied him 
into the pulpit and introduced him to the 
assemblage as a "Watchman in Zion," 
and added a few simple words of prayer 
for help for the speaker in sounding a 
note of alarm concerning one of the foes 
of the church, and for the hearer in ac- 
cepting the same. Many a head was 
bowed that would otherwise have been 
held erect simply because Mr. Homely 's 
religion was held to be genuine. The 
voice of the speaker continued the 
prayer. Like one who, from oft com- 
muning with Deity comes with assur- 
ance before the throne, did he pour out 
his soul before his Maker; and when he 
arose and began to speak, though the 
words were commonplace enough, an un- 
dehnable feeling took possession of the 
audience : a feeling partly of confidence 
in the speaker, partly of awe as though 
he were invested with supernatural 
power. 

A stillness as of death pervaded the 
house as he portrayed the lodge in its 
anti-Christian character. A half hour 
passed by — an hour of attentfve listen- 
ing, and then at the utterance of some 
bold assertion, a muttered oath from Mr. 



48 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



Vallance's party which occupied a posi- 
tion near the door, followed by the dis- 
tinctly audible remark, "It's about time 
this thing was wound up," caused some 
diversion. 

The remark was followed by some 
hissing, which soon became general 
among that class of men all over the 
house, and quite a number of order lov- 
ing listeners arose to leave. At this junc- 
ture the attention of all was attracted 
towards an individual in the rear of the 
house, who sprang upon a seat singing 
the words — 

"There are powers that move in darkness like 

the dragons of the pit, 
They are wily as the serpent and have all 

the serpent's wit, 
But will find their heads of venom and will 
surely crush them yet, 
For the truth goes marching on." 
Instead of the chorus the singer took 
up another verse — 

"Let the weaklings fly in terror, let the schem- 
ing turn aghast, 

We will nail Jehovah's banner to the wildly 
rolling mast, 

And we'll stand like men around it, till we 
hear His trumpet blast- 
Let the truth go marching on." 

Why should such sentiments at such 
a time, even sung by a voice of wonder- 
ful power and sweetness, have the ef- 
fect of quieting the turbulent element in 
that assemblage? But such was its im- 
mediate effect, and when the singer sat 
down, a gentleman in another part of the 
room arose and, in a tone which showed 
power of command, uttered a few scath- 
ing words of rebuke so adroitly applied 
that when he appealed to "this intelli- 
gent audience" not to allow the speaker 
to be maltreated, but hear him to the 
end, those to whom the former words 
applied immediately classed themselves 
with those to whom the latter were 
spoken and nothing more of a disturbing 
character took place. 

The lecture was finished and fudge 
B. again arose, remarking that many of 
them had come some distance to hear 
the speaker. Would it be possible to 
hear the subject continued on the fol- 
tawing evening? His eno-aging- manner, 
aided by the dignity of his office, won 
acquiescence to his request from even Mr. 
Gillman, who had said to himself more 
than once that evening, "They wont get 



the house for tomorrozv night. No, sir!" 
And so the meeting closed. Uncle Job 
found his way to the side of Judge B., 
whose hand he grasped in an emphatic 
manner, remarking, "It's plain as day 
the Lord sent you here tonight, jedge. 
Those wimmen have been in the vestry 
all evenin' prayin' the Lord would let 
this meetin' go on all right. An' where's 
that fellow that sang so grand ? I never 
was so glad in my life." 

Mr. Thompson unconsciously found 
himself one of the anti-Masonic party 
who gathered around the speaker ere 
they left the church, and he there 
acknowledged to his old friend, Judge B., 
that the "shock of enlightenment" he 
had that evening received would preclude 
his future fellowship with "the unfruit- 
ful works of darkness." 

Carrie walked home that evening with 
her sister and Tom. To the latter's ban- 
tering question as to where Mr. Vallance 
was, she replied somewhat crossly that 
she neither knew nor cared. 
(To be continued.) 



THE LAW OF GOD AND THE LAW 
OF THE LODGE. 



PRESIDENT C. A. BLANCHARD, WHEATON 
COLLEGE. 

It is one of the mysteries that good 
men can do the things they do. As I 
have recently spoken to you on this sub- 
ject I do not propose to repeat my re- 
marks, but they are to serve as an in- 
troduction to some reflections that I 
wish to make on the duty of Christian 
people respecting lodges. It is my pur- 
pose to put side by side as well as I am 
able the laws of the church of Jesus 
Christ and the laws of the synagogues 
of Satan which now abound on every 
hand. It is one of the misfortunes that 
so many men seem entirely unable to 
reach the fundamental question in any 
important matter; it has always been so, 
I suppose always will be so. A multi- 
tude of people who are fairly intelligent 
when the lodge question is put before 
them can see no further than the little 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURK 



49 



group of lodge men with whom they are 
personally acquainted. If these people 
are fairly good, they at once conclude 
that the lodges are fairly good, and some 
think if the lodge people are not good 
the lodges themselves are to be con- 
demned. A moment's reflection on the 
part of any thoughtful man or woman 
will show that these conclusions are 
neither of them warranted by the prem- 
ise's. 

Assuming that I am speaking to 
thoughtful people who can look through 
a subject with some degree of thorough- 
ness and who have no desire except to 
know the truth, let me therefore ask 
your attention to a few fundamental 
facts in regard to this subject. 

The Law of the Ledge. 

The laws of secret societies are given 
in their oaths or obligations. In addi- 
tion to these oaths and obligations there 
are what are called lectures and there 
are various questions and answers in 
a sort of catechism, but the lazv of a 
lodgfr is the oath which it imposes. 

When one considers secret orders he 
is at once struck by the similarity of 
obligations ; there is variety in words but 
a singular unity in. requirements. In a 
general way we may say that the law of 
the lodge requires, in the first place, 
secrecy. All secret organizations impose 
this obligation, some enforce it with 
blood curdling penalties calling for the 
cutting out of tongues, the smiting off 
of heads, etc., etc. Others are less blood 
thirsty in their phrasing, but all alike 
say to the candidate for admission, "If 
you come into this order, we expect you 
to bind yourself under a solemn oath or 
obligation never to reveal to outside 
parties the things which are said and 
done in the meetings of this order." This 
is a general proposition which can be 
easily verified by the slightest examina- 
tion of the rituals. 



I Will Obey. 
A second section in the law of the 
lodge is the obligation to unquestioning 
obedience, "1 will always hail, ever con- 
ceal, and never reveal any of the arts, 
parts, or points of the secret arts and 
mysteries of ancient Free Masonry. 
♦ * * Furthermore, do I promise and 
swear that I will obey signs, summons 
and tokens given, handed, sent, or 
thrown to me by a brother of this de- 
gree or by a member of a lawfully con- 
stituted lodge of such. This is the sub- 
stance of the oath or obligation of all 
secret societies in regard to these two 
matters — to keep secret and to obey. 

A Blind Man's Promise. 
When a man promises to obey the 

laws of a secret society or the require- 
ments of a lodge he is supposed to be in 
total ignorance as to the character of 
these laws and requirements and unless 
he has been informed by some seceded 
member, he is in ignorance. Consider 
now the possibilities following such an 
obligation. Suppose the lodge requires 
him to do unchristian or unlawful deeds. 
what shall the Christian man do? On 
the one hand, he has taken a solemn 
oath to conform to the requirements of 
his order; on the other hand, as a chris- 
tian man he is under obligation to fol- 
low the example and obey the commands 
of Jesus Christ. Let the question be 
one of the simplest which can be raised 
— the question as to the prayers of the 
order. The Christian understands him- 
self to be permitted and required to pray 
in the name of Jesus Christ, he is taught 
that no prayer not offered through Jesus 
Christ is acceptable to God, but secret 
orders generally solicit as members men 
of all religious faiths and men of no re- 
ligious faith whatsoever. In order to 
make these men happy and contented in 
the orders the name of Jesus Christ is 
explicitly forbidden ; some make the pro- 
hibition more obnoxious in form, others 



50 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



make it less so, but in general the name 
of Jesus is not permitted in these organ- 
izations. 

Lodgemen Ignorant and Informed. 
The members of these organizations 
respecting this question may be divided 
into two classes, first, the ignorant class 
who do not know the fact above stated ; 
they are themselves often professed 
Christians, and the lodges with which 
they are connected have a number of 
Christian men in them. The chaplains 
or other religious officials frequently use 
the name of Jesus Christ in the extem- 
pore religious services of the order. The 
result is that these people do not believe 
the truth just stated and they are prompt 
to deny it. So far as their ignorance 
justifies them in the denial they are not 
to be condemned, but it is only their 
ignorance which is a justification. The 
other class of lodge men are those who 
ire well informed concerning the organ- 
izations, who know that Jesus Christ is 
excluded from them and who justify 
the exclusion on the ground that the 
orders inviting all sorts of men must 
not introduce any religious phraseology 
which will be offensive to any. These 
men are not eo numerous as the first 
class, but they are well informed people 
and they are the influential people in the 
order, tl ey are the men who hold the 
offices, edit the publications, and dispose 
of the funds. 

Birds of a Feather. 
The old proverb, ''Birds of a feather 

flock together," is undoubtedly true as 
a general proposition. Still further it 
represents a great principle in human 
action. Birds of a feather not only do 
flock together, but they should do so. 
There would be no propriety in a good 
man seeking for association with a lot 
of evil men; he would infallibly be cor- 
rupted, if he should do so. It would 
be better if a bad man should seek the 
fellowship of good men ; if he should 



do this because he was tired of being 
bad and desired to become good, cer- 
tainly he should be commended; if, how- 
ever, being evil and intending to remain 
evil he seeks for association with good 
men, it is obvious that there can be no 
worthy motive for his action. Birds of 
a feather should flock together. The 
lodge law is a contradiction of this 
fundamental principle in social organ- 
ization. Fellowship in lodges is not de- 
termined by character but by lodge oaths. 
If a good man becomes a lodge man, he 
is obligated to have fellowship with the 
members of the order, good or bad. If 
an evil man unites with a lodge he is put 
under the same obligation, neither of 
these men chooses his associates so far 
as the lodge is concerned on the principle 
of affinity in character, the man associ- 
ates with lodge men because they aie 
lodge men, not because they are worthy, 
not because their ideals are the same 
as his. 

This difficulty which is obvious be- 
comes more marked in its evil influence 
when the lodge is widely scattered as to 
its organizations and members. One of 
the boasts of certain organizations is that 
heathen and savages as well as Chris- 
tians are members of the organization. 
Protection from Lodge Criminals. 

Men are frequently urged to unite with 

lodges on the ground that if they do so 
they will be protected from criminal? 
who might otherwise injure them. At 
the present time young men are being 
urged to join secret societies because, 
if they do so, they may secure promo- 
tion and advancement, and because, if 
they should be in danger on fields of bat- 
tle or should be in difficulty as prisoners 
of war, they can secure privileges and 
friendships which other persons cannot 
obtain. This statement is undoubtedly 
true in part, and so far as it is true it 
involves a traitorous disposition on the 
part of the lodge man, for one who 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



51 



hopes to secure favors from an enemy 
because of membership in a society 
thereby advertises his willingness to be- 
stow like favors upon his enemies, and 
this is the state of mind of a traitor and 
not of an honest man. 

While the desire for lodge promotion 
is not so seriously evil in its character, 
it nevertheless is a reflection on the char- 
acter of the person who for this reason 
becomes identified with the lodge. An 
honest man who is thoroughly manly 
desires those promotions and advan- 
tages in society to which he is entitled 
by reason of his character attainments 
and service, he does not desire anything 
more nor different, but the very propo- 
sition that one who is connected with a 
secret order is thereby more likely to 
obtain position and emolument than one 
who is not so connected shows that the 
man does not rely upon himself, his own 
merits, but is making a subtle appeal to 
the principle of favoritism. 
Swear Not at All. 

Another fact connected with the law 
of the lodge is that in general all organ- 
izations of this kind are united by oaths 
or obligations which are equivalent 
thereto. "You do solemnly promise and 
swear" is one of the propositions which 
is continually repeated, which the can- 
didate is obliged continually to repeat. 
Now the teaching of our Lord Jesus 
Christ respecting oaths 'is very positive ; 
his language furnished to us again and 
again is, "I say unto you, swear not at 
all." It is well known that certain re- 
ligious organizations look upon this pro- 
hibition as forbidding even the civil or 
the ecclesiastical oath. Whether they 
are right or wrong in this judgment 
there is noi question but that ordinary 
oath taking is forbidden by this injunc- 
tion. An oath to be legitimate and bind- 
ing must be in the first place adminis- 
tered by competent authority ; it must, 
in the second place, require nothing 



which is forbidden by the law of God; 

it must, in the third place, be understood 
by the person who takes it before he 
assumes the obligation which it imposes ; 
of course, it must not involve fraud; in- 
tentional fraud vitiates even ordinary 
business contracts and of course, it de- 
stroys the binding character of an oath. 
These are some of the principles in- 
volved in legitimate swearing, allowing 
that there be any legitimate swearing. 
Lodge Oaths Profane and Void. 
One who has studied secret societies 

finds that there is no essential in the law- 
ful oath which is involved in the lodge 
obligation. In the first place, lodge of- 
ficials are not empowered to administer 
oaths, they are not officers of the state, 
they are not officers of the Christian 
church, they are officers of human or- 
ganizations which for its own purpose 
resolves to bind men strongly to it and 
for this purpose uses the oath. The 
oaths bind men to unlawful and un- 
christian deeds, no man has a right to 
promise to conceal secrets which are un- 
known to him or to obey obligations with 
which he is not acquainted. Oaths of 
this character have before now involved 
men in partnership with murderers, they 
are liable to do so at any time, and the 
sin of the oath is not that men become 
partners in the guilt of murder, but that 
they have taken oaths which at any time 
may make them so. Of course, the fact 
that the lodge candidate is not permitted 
to. know the character of the oath which 
he is required to swear makes the oath 
itself unlawful, as he has no right to 
obligate himself in this way; he has no 
right to say that he will be so obligated ; 
thus the oath is in itself from its begin- 
ning an unlawful and wicked oath, which 
ought to be instantly renounced by any- 
one who has been deceived into taking it. 
It is furthermore in evidence that the 
oath of the candidate is secured by a 
fraudulent misrepresentation. The great 



52 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



secret organizations speak all the while 
of their secrets, yet the things which 
they call their secrets have been pub- 
lished to the vvorld for scores of years. 
The ordinary method of persuading men 
to take them is to pretend that they have 
not been revealed. I never have chanced to 
see but one or two men who said that 
those who administered the lodge oath 
to them told them frankly that the sub- 
ject matter of the lodge had been re- 
vealed, generally there is an attempt to 
^onceal, and this involves a denial of the 
truth of revelations which all intelligent 
members of the organizations know have 
been made. President Finney speaking 
of such obligations said, "It is a sin to 
take such obligations. This sin cannot 
be forgiven until it is repented. It is 
not repented until the oaths are re- 
nounced." This was the opinion of a 
great souled child of God, world-re- 
nowned for the work which he did in 
the Kingdom of God. 

The Law of the Church. 

Now the church is not like the lodge, 
a human organization. It is divine in 
its origin, character and history. The 
family is the primitive, divine organiza- 
tion, Ged set men in families from the 
beginning; Satan who is the God of the 
lodge seeks to destroy all the things that 
God has created, he is, therefore, the 
antagonist of the family, the church, and 
the state, the three great social organiza- 
tions which God has established for the 
comfort, protection, training, and sanc- 
tification of men. It is obvious, if this 
statement is correct, that the law of the 
church must radically differ from the 
law of the lodge. The moment we in- 
spect the law of the church we find that 
this supposition is correct. The church 
binds no man to secrecy, on the other 
hand, from the days of Jesus Christ anc| 
his apostles to this present hour, the law 
of the church has been publicity, not 



concealment. Jesus Christ went so far 
as to say to his disciples that they should 
publish on the house tops the teaching 
which he communicated in the privacy of 
their ordinary lives. "What I speak to 
you in the ear that proclaim ye upon the 
house tops." This teaching of the great 
founder of the church has been carried 
out by the organizations which have re- 
sulted in all lands and in all ages. It is 
true, that at times the church teaching 
has been secret, but these were the perse- 
cution times, when members of the 
church were beheaded, hanged, drowned, 
imprisoned, and tortured in every way 
because of their faith. The church has 
never voluntarily been a secert organiza- 
tion. 

"Let Your Yea Be Yea and Your Nay Be 
Nay." 

The church of Jesus Christ has al- 
ways antagonized profanity. One of the 
notable characteristics of conversion is 
the fact that profane swearers become 
careful and reverent in their speech. 

Not long since a great secret organiza- 
tion in the state of Illinois and in the re- 
gion round about organized a society to 
get the teachers of the order to stop 
swearing and telling vile stories. What 
would be the state of a Christian church 
which would be compelled to undertake 
a work like that. In the lectures of the 
lodges there are some teachings that re- 
quire men to be careful about their use 
of the name of God, but the very con- 
stitution of these organizations being 
based on profanity naturally leads mem- 
bers to be profane. 

Members and officers of these organ- 
izations have been and are now in many 
instances exceedingly profane. If they 
are professed Christians, they violate the 
law of the church; if they are simply 
lodge men, they violate no law of the 
lodge, though they disregard certain of 
its lectures. 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



53 



They Went to Their Own Company. 
I have spoken of the fact that in all 
sane society fellowship is based on af- 
finity, good men naturally go to good 
men, and wicked men naturally go to 
wicked men for companionship and as- 
sociation. The lodges, on the other 
hand, yoke the ox and the ass unequally 
together, the child of God and the child 
of the world; if they have taken the ob- 
ligation of the order, they are required 
to recognize one another as brethren and 
they do. It goes without saying that the 
rule will be that these unequal compan- 
ionships generally operate to the disad- 
vantage of those who are best in moral 
character. The wicked man is not often 
made good, the good man is often cor- 
rupted. The fraternal companionship 
of good men and evil is positively for- 
bidden by our Lord Jesus Christ as well 
as being condemned by the reason of 
the case. A rotten apple in a barrel of 
sound apples will, if you give it time, 
make the whole barrel rotten ; a sound 
apple in a barrel of rotten apples will 
never make the rotten apples sound, but 
will on the other hand become rotten ; 
this is the continual operation of the law 
of character contact among men. What 
then ought the church member to do 
about secret organizations? Evidently, 
he should do precisely what the law of 
God requires — have no fellowship with 
them, and on the other hand, he should 
reprove them, he should continually be 
seeking to bring men to Jesus Christ 
and the organization which he has estab- 
lished, that they may not be caught and 
ensnared by the worldly organizations 
which Jesus Christ has not only not 
commended, but has positively forbid- 
den. This seems so obvious as to re- 
quire no argument, nor does it require 
much argument. It is a question of the 
will and not of the intellect. Are you 
willing to do the will of God? If so 
you may know the doctrine whether it 



is of God or whether Jesus Christ spoke 
of himself, but if you profess to be a 
christian and a: the same time disregard 
the plain teaching of Jesus Christ, the 
founder of the church, you have reason 
to beware, lest when the King comes 
you be not admitted to his presence, but 
be shut into the outer darkness as one 
of his' enemies. Therefore, "Come out 
from among them and be separate." "Be 
ye also ready, for in such an hour as ye 
think not, the Son of Man cometh." 
Wheaton, Illinois. 



MASONIC CREED AND MISSION. 

"What is the creed and mission of this 
mighty Brotherhood which makes it 
stand out in bold relief against the sky- 
line of a universe? Its creed is a belief 
in God, and Immortality — in God, the 
All Father, the Great Original First 
Cause, Architect and Creator of all that 
is. It strives to learn His will, that this 
little life we live is not the end, but that 
beyond the 'Gates of Mystery' there will 
be complete understanding and full fruit- 
ion in 'realms of life and light eternal.' 

"Its mission is to protect innocence, 
to redress wrong, to relieve distress and 
make men wiser, better men, that the 
world may be better because they have 
lived. It stands for all that is great and 
good and noble and true — honor, moral- 
ity, truth, charity, patriotism and all 
their kindred virtues — and more — it is 
an active, not a passive force. It pro- 
motes education and condemns ignor- 
ance. It cherishes liberty and combats 
despotism. It counsels toleration and 
combats bigotry. It teaches enlighten- 
ment and combats superstition. 

"This is the Mason's work and in that 
work all Rites are joined. There is no 
contention between the Rites of Mason- 
ry, 'save that noble contention, or rather 
emulation, of who can best work and 
best agree.' 

"All regular Masons have received 
their first instruction at the same altar 
in the Mother Lodge of all, the Blue — 
and it matters not if their later inspira- 
tion is received from the Roval Arch, 



54 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



Templarism or the Scottish Rite, the re- 
sult is just the same— each is contribut- 
ing its part to the completed Temple, 
where Confucian, Buddhist, Hebrew, 
Mohammedan and Christian can meet 
as brethren on the common ground of 
the Fatherhood of God and the Brother- 
hood of man." 

(From an address by Bro. E. A. Sims, 
$2d at the Rose Croix feast in Galves- 
ton, Texas, published in the Masonic 
Herald.) — Quarterly Bulletin of Iowa 
Masonic Library, July, 1916. 



SATAN'S U-BOAT. 

PROF. J. R. MILLIN. 

A writer in a recent number of a 
church paper looks with alarm upon the 
growing and aggressive infidelity in our 
colleges and universities. And that is 
well. But some one should sound the 
ten-blow alarm over the fact that Satan's 
submarine has broken a hole in the ship 
of church, and the church wallows in a 
heavy sea. Satan's U-Boat is the Lodge. 
Figures aside, the lodge has filled the 
church, both in pulpit and in pew, with 
unbelief. Hear it ! There is "no room" 
for Christ in the lodge. Is Christ, the 
real Christ, welcome in the church ? See 
Rev. 3:14-20. And where are "the 
.seven churches" today? Satan laughs. 



He is either a fool or a madman, he 
is either very weak or very wicked that 
prays and prays but never looks after 
his prayers ; that shoots many an arrow 
toward heaven, but never minds where 
his arrows alight. — Thos. Brooks. 



They tell us that Luther ignored good 
works. It is true that he would not al- 
low good works to be spoken of as the 
means of salvation ; but of those who 
professed faith in Jesus he demanded 
holy lives. Luther abounded in prayer 
and charity. — Spurgeon. 



Oh, brethren, be great believers ! Lit- 
tle faith will bring your souls to heaven, 
but great faith will bring heaven to your 
souls. — Spurgeon. 



j^etos of #ur »rfe 

It is seldom that we have had the 
pleasure of a call at the Cynosure office 
from Rev. A. M. Malcolm of Albia, 
Iowa, such as we enjoyed last month. 
He is president of the Iowa Christian 
Association and very greatly misses Rev. 
A. H. Brat of the Christian Reformed 
church, now with the Army. He was a 
"live wire" in the anti-secret work of 
Iowa, and his memory is cherished by 
his associates, who will be glad to see 
him return. 



The value of the last April Cynosure 
in the minds of those who received it, 
has been very evident from the demand 
which has exceeded our ability to sup- 
ply. 



Question : — Where may one obtain a 
list of all the College fraternities, their 
history, etc.? 

Answer \- — Such a work, "Manual of 
American College Fraternities" by Baird, 
edition 1915, can be procured from the 
College Fraternity Publishing Company, 
363 West 20th Street, New York City. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

Dear Friends and N. C. A. Co-workers : 
We may well rejoice in the privilege 
of another of the annual meetings of 
our association. We believe God has 
not only given us the testimony we bear, 
but enabled us to hold it aloft during 
the half century of our existence. To 
him be all the glory. Our lessons in the 
hard school of experience have taught 
that the world is not as ready to accept 
the simple and plain teaching of the 
Master as it should be. Reforms are 
accomplished by sacrifice and years of 
toil. The seed must be wisely placed, 
and well cultivated, if the desired har- 
vest is secured. The success of many 
reforms surely should cheer us in the 
hope that the one in which we unite is 
soon to accomplish that for which we 
unitedly 'pray, the destruction of the 
anti-Christ of the secret lodge system. 
Never has the world moved as it does 
today. The light of this age is too 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



55 



bright, let us hope, for the ignorance 
and moral darkness in which lodgery 
finds its natural home. May we not 
hope the seriousness of our time is caus- 
ing men to be more thoughtful; that 
thinking men and women, brought to 
realize that they are created in the image 
of the Almighty God, will not desire to 
play they are mere animals, as many of 
their lodge titles would suggest. The 
argument is strong on our side. A 
proper presentation wins the victory 
with the thoughtful. When I asked a 
stranger I chanced to meet the question, 
"Had we better all join the Masons?" 
he replied, "I've belonged to six lodges, 
and they are a load of straw!" Doubt- 
less he expressed the feeling of thou- 
sands. The inability of the lodges to 
furnish nourishment to sustain a godly 
spiritual life surely must be known to 
the thoughtful lodge man, yet for one 
reason or another they continue to feed 
upon "the straw." Wheat costs more, 
but we may rejoice in the spiritual store- 
house ; there is always enough for the 
Allies. The past has been a year of toil 
and conflict, but "thanks be to God who 
giveth us the victory," we are still push- 
ing forward with undaunted confidence 
in the final success of our cause. 

"For right the day shall win ; 
To doubt would be disloyalty, 
To falter would be sin." 

Through sunshine and rain, cold and 
heat, winter and summer your eastern 
secretary has held meetings as usual, 
and secured as many Cynosure subscrip- 
tions as in years passed. I have been 
kept in health. When I recall the dan- 
gers seen, as well as those unseen, I think 
it remarkable that I have been so pro- 
tected and sustained. In an Indiana 
town visited I was informed they had 
three kinds of measles. I took neither. 

The lesson of conservation now being 
given throughout our nation will doubt- 
less have its bearing on our work. The 
many must conserve, that others may 
have. The expenditure of lodges in 
costly costumes in which to parade our 
streets let us hope is diminished. How- 
ever, I recently noticed men in parade 
seeking to represent Indians. Precious 
time and money is thus still being wasted 
while thousands go hungry, yea are dy- 



ing for want of what this waste would 
buy. Yet would not the manifest suc- 
cesses along reform lines indicate the 
number of seriously minded is being in- 
creased, and that our people will dis- 
cover and stop the holes in the sacks 
from which their treasure is being lost ': 
Is it because I am too optimistic that I 
believe many who have ears to hear anti- 
lodge truth are listening? Are we not 
learning it is not safe to stand frog-like 
with open mouth to catch every fly that 
chances our way? Surely it is a dull 
student that does not learn in the school 
of our times ! Yes, friends, we are mov- 
ing ahead to help a multitude who de- 
sire light and liberty. 

I have delivered 195 lectures and ad- 
dresses during the year. The approxi- 
mate number of calls made is 2,320. The 
number of Cynosure subscriptions ob- 
tained 1,057. Collections on the field 
amount to $252.89. The expense of 
travel $462.92. The usual hospitality 
and courtesy of our friends has been 
extended at places where meetings have 
been held. Believing in the old saying, 
"An ounce of prevention is worth a 
pound of cure," I have sought out col- 
leges and seminaries, and have probably 
addressed as many students in the past 
year as in any previous. It has been a 
great joy to note the inquiries made and 
the interest these students have shown. 
If any one thinks we are expounding 
dead issues, let them address an audi- 
ence of students and note results. 

I have not held the usual number of 
state conventions, owing to the special 
conditions that obtain in our country. 
After consulting with state officers and 
some of the most interested friends, it 
was deemed best for the present to omit 
the state meetings, giving the funds and 
energy thus usually expended to other 
lines of the work. An exception to this 
rule was made in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania. Efforts centered at Mount Joy 
were rewarded, as was noted at the time 
in the Cynosure reports. 

While a few Cynosure subscriptions 
have been discontinued because of the 
death of the subscriber, or the financial 
pressure of our times, the larger num- 
ber I believe have been glad to continue 
because of the support thus given. May 



56 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



God greatly bless those who stand by 
in the trying times! As God cares for 
his own, surely we may face the future 
with renewed faith, courage and zeal. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 

MRS. LIZZIE WOODS ROBERSON. 

Mr. President and Officers of the Na- 
tional Christian Association : 
I beg leave to make to you my seventh 
Annual Report. I have worked in five 
states in addition to Arkansas, the state 
in which I live. I visited Hollywood, 
Mississippi ; Memphis, Trenton Bells 
and Brownville, Tennessee ; Kansas City, 
Kansas, and Kansas City, Missouri, and 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

One hundred were brought to Christ, 
and sixty or more of these were grown- 
up people saved from the sin of lodges 
and from the use of snuff, tobacco, 
whiskey and beer. I have given the peo- 
ple the written Word of God that is able 
to save them. (James 1:21). The 
Lord has blest me in this work accord- 
ing to my ability ; where there is a little, 
there little is required and I expect to 
shine in my corner having your prayers 
to God in my behalf. 

I know it is the prayers of the strong 
men and women in the National Chris- 
tion Association, and the blessed women 
of the "Fireside Schools'' in the South, 
who are praying for me and for this 
work, which prayers God has heard, and 
He has kept me for there is but one step 
between me and death. (1 Sam. 3:20). 
My life has been threatened many times 
but the Lord delivered me. I may yet 
go like Elder Countee. We cannot tell, 
but there is something in me that con- 
strains me to go on and speak the Word 
with boldness and in love. 

I have given out many tracts and se- 
cured some subscribers for the Cyno- 
sure and sold a few rituals. My health 
has not been good since last December. 
I have been very sick all the winter and 
I am yet feeble, but the Lord has given 
me strength to be up again and I am 
trusting in Him, for my perfect healing. 
I am sorry I cannot attend the meet- 
ing but you shall have my prayers. I 
am praying for you and for all men that 
are in authority (2 Tim. 2:2-8). God 
wants us to pray "lifting up Holy hands, 



without wrath or doubting," and "the 
eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, 
and his ears are open unto their prayers : 
but the face of the Lord is against them 
that do evil" so then God is looking at 
us and listening to hear us pray. All 
should pray for President Wilson. Yes, 
and for all the leaders of the people, for 
righteousness exalts a nation but sin is 
a reproach to any people. 

God bless all the leaders of this An- 
nual Meeting as well as all the leaders 
of the Nation. Oh, God give us right- 
eous leaders for the nation and holy men 
in the pulpits is my prayer. Amen. 

Yours for Jesus and for the work of 
the N. C. A., 

Mrs. Lizzie Roberson. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 

REV. FRANCIS J. DAVIDSON. 

To the Annual Meeting of the National 

Christian Association : 
Dear Brethren and Sisters : 

I thank God through our Lord and 
Savior Jesus Christ, that I am yet alive 
to offer up prayers for those who are 
bound by Satan to the anti-Christ and 
the secret lodge system. I find it a 
great pleasure to send you this my an- 
nual report to let God's faithful know 
that I am still on the Lord's side battling 
for truth and righteousness. Since the 
last Annual Meeting, I have suffered 
many hardships, disappointments, and 
untold opposition, but thank God, I am 
still firmly planted on His Word. I 
have traveled 1,225 miles, preached 155 
sermons, as a result of which thirty-nine 
souls have been saved from sin and the 
Lodge. Praise the Lord ! I have de- 
livered 83 antisecret lodge lectures. I 
have made 781 calls at private homes 
where I read the Bible and prayed. I 
have secured 266 readers for the Chris- 
tian Cynosure, mostly for three months 
each. I have received in cash $197.59. 

I have visited twenty-five ministers' 
meetings, four district associations, and 
four conferences. I have held eight 
Bible Institutes. I was elected last 
month as district missionary of the First 
District Baptist Association of Louisiana. 

I have done the very best I could un- 
der the circumstances. The opposition 
to truth is great and seems to be grow- 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



57 



ing stronger. My health and strength 
are gradually failing, and this old earthly 
tabernacle is gradually dissolving, but 
thank God I have a building not made 
with hands, but eternally in the heavens. 
I earnestly ask your special prayers, I 
am yours for His righteous cause. 

To do evil for good is human corrup- 
tion ; to do good for good is civil retribu- 
tion ; but to do good for evil is Christian 
perfection. Though this be not the grace 
of nature, yet it is the nature of grace. — 
William Seeker. 



Praise Christ for everything. He is 
the foundation of every good thought, 
desire and affection. It should be our 
aim to draw all we can from Him by 
prayer and return Him all we can by 
praise. — Payson. 



A cool and cowardly defense of Chris- 
tian principles will always embolden the 
enemies of the Gospel, and discourage 
its friends. Be resolute for God or give 
up His cause. — John Ryland. 



I am God's corn, and I am willing to 
be ground that I may be bread for God's 
children. — Ignatius. 



O Sacred Fire! consume the dross 

Thou seest still in me ; 
Burn — burn— whatever be the loss ! 

Refine me thoroughly ! 
Then fire my spirit as I pray, 

And melt my hardness, Lord ! 
That with a glowing zeal I may 

Declare Thy Saving Word. 

— William Olnev 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Members of the National Christian 
Association : 
I hereby submit my annual statement 
as treasurer for the year from May i, 
1917, to April 30, 1918, inclusive. It 
shows resources and liabilities on May 
1, 1918, and cash receipts and disburse- 
ments during the year, as well as the 
loss and gain statement, for the same 
period and a list of personal accounts 
receivable and also of those payable. 
You will note with pleasure, I am sure, 
that the capital account is slightly larger 
than at the beginning of last year. Two 
bequests of $500 each became available 



during the year. We cannot but be 
thankful to God and the friends whom 
he has inspired to contribute to the work 
of the association during the past year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. 1. Phillips, 

- Treasurer. 
Resources. 
Real Estate : 

Carpenter building $20,000.00 

Rest home 50.00 

79th St. building 2,838.97 

Dawson farm interest 12,000.00 

$34,888.97 

Bills receivable 13,525.00 

Bond account 1,693.50 

Stock account 1.00 

Book account — inventory 1,437.43 

Tract account — inventory 380.39 

Expense account — inventory 89.79 

Fixtures account — inventory 482.30 

Publishing material — inventory 361.81 

Reference library — inventory 397.08 

Personal accounts receivable 118.14 

Cash on hand April 30, 1918 1,519.20 

$54,894.67 
Liabilities. 
Annuities : 

Harrington ..'.:. $ 200.00 

Henderson annuitv bond 500.00 

Johnson 100.00 

Michigan 300.00 

Morris annuity bond 200.00 

New York 1.200.00 

Rosenberger 1,000.00 

Woodward 50.00 

$ 3,550.00 
Sundry Funds : 

Cynosure endowment $ 25.00 

Eastern annuity 5,000.00 

Nebraska 1-1,642.74 

Ohio 160.00 

Pennsylvania 100.00 

Richardson County 1.000.00 

Theological Seminary Bk 114.91 

Semi-Centennial 4.75 

Soldiers 74.94 

$21,122.34 
Cvnosure subscriptions paid in ad- 
vance 1,005.13 

Personal account payable 134.26 

Capital account (National Christian 
Association) : 
Balance May 1, 1917. .. .$28,964.02 
Gain, 1918 (L.&G. acct.) 118.92 

29,082.94 

$54,894.67 



REPORT OF AUDITORS. 

To the National Christian Association. 
The undersigned auditors of the Na- 
tional Christian Association have ex- 
amined the books of the treasurer, W. I. 



56 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



Phillips, up to April 30, 1918, inclusive, 
and find that they are correctly kept and 
that there were vouchers for all expendi- 
tures. We also find that securities are 
on hand, as stated in the annual report 
of the treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) Geo. W. Bond, 

David S. Warner, 
H. A. Fischer, Jr., 

Auditors. 
Chicago, 111., May 21, 1918. 



ANTI-CATHOLIC PRO-MASONIC 
"MENACE." 

Spring City, Pennsylvania, 

April 15th, 1918. 

Editor "Christian Cynosure" : 

In your comment on the workings of 
the "Orange" lodge you state, "This is 
the secret society method of opposing 
Catholicism." 

This expression brought to my mind 
an experience I had (about five years 
ago) with the Editor of The Menace, 
the anti-Catholic pro-Masonic paper. I 
was induced to subscribe for the paper 
by a neighbor who is a Mason, and after 
receiving several copies 1 noticed that 
mention was frequently made of the pub- 
lication of the oath of the "Knight of 
Columbus." Being desirous of getting 
information about the workings of se- 
cret societies I wrote a personal letter 
to the Editor, with a request that he send 
me a copy of the paper containing that 
oath, also a copy of the Masonic oath 
In the course of a few days I received 
a copy of an alleged Knights of Colum- 
bus oath, but to date I have not re- 
ceived the Masonic oath. 

Thinking people will ask the question : 
If demand is made upon the Catholics, 
by The Menace and by the Masons, for 
an investigation of her institutions such 
as convents, protectories, houses of the 
Good Shepherd, etc., why should not the 
Masons themselves come out into the 
light ? 

If their works are right and good, 
should it have been necessary to attempt 
to bring before Congress Bill H. R. 
5712? 

Would not Paul if here ask the ques- 
tion of The Menace as he did of the 
Romans, "Thou that preachest a man 



should not steal, dost thou steal ? Thou 
that sayest a man should not commit 
adultery, doest thou commit adultery? 
Thou that abhorrest idols, doest thou 
commit sacrilege? And thinkest thou 
this, O man, that judgest them which do 
such things, and doest the same, that 
thou shalt escape the judgment of God?" 

The Psalmist's method of teaching 
transgressors the Lord's ways and con- 
verting them was by first confessing his 
own sins, asking the Lord to wash, 
cleanse, purge and blot out his own in- 
iquities, and last, but not least, create in 
him a clean heart. And then, he says, 
"will I teach transgressors thy ways ; 
and sinners shall be converted unto 
thee." 

May the Cynosure continue to do 
what its name indicates. May it hold 
up Christ as the only means of salva- 
tion. 

John W. Kolb. 



MONTHLY REPORT EASTERN 
SECRETARY. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

As my annual report is to appear in 
this number of the Cynosure there is 
space for only a brief recital of the many 
meetings that have fully occupied my 
time during the past month. At Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, there were several op- 
portunities for lectures ofTered that I 
was compelled to pass. At Central Col- 
lege at Ubee, (near Huntington) In- 
diana, I spent some days with pleasure, 
and profit to the Cause. Addresses were 
made to the Theological students and 
later to the church members of the Radi- 
cal United Brethren's meeting there. 
Friends at the United Brethren Publish- 
ing House were cordial and helpful as 
ever. No church is standing for the an- 
tilodge truth more faithfully than they. 
My next stop was at Fairmount, In- 
diana, where I found opportunity to give 
three antilodge addresses, and secure a 
good list of Cynosure subscribers. The 
addresses were given in the Wesleyan 
Theological Seminary, and in the large 
new Wesleyan Methodist church, and at 
the mid-week meeting of the Friends 
church. I was glad to note the in- 
creased interest, and growth of the anti- 
lodge forces at this important center. 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



59 



When building the new Wesleyan church 
lodge men offered money if request 
should be made through their lodge of- 
ficials which of course would mean a 
compromise. It goes without saying no 
such request was made. The Wesleyan 
pastor told of the wonderful divine help 
given so the church could be dedicated 
without debt, and without letting down 
of the standard of holy living required. 
Owing to several hindrances the lecture 
arranged in the Church of the Brethren, 
Peru, Indiana, was not largely attended. 
Some spoke of help received at this meet- 
ing. At Frankfort, Indiana, a liberty 
loan parade was in progress. A com- 
pany of white men dressed to imitate 
Indians looked very silly in this parade, 
to say nothing of the money thus worse 
than wasted. In the Church of the 
Brethren, Flora, Indiana, and at Bach- 
elor's Run in the country near, large 
audiences welcomed my message. The 
good influence of the N. C. A. conven- 
tion is still felt in these churches. A 
stop at Lafayette, Ind., helped some. 
Since coming to Chicago I have held 
meetings in four of the seven Mennonite 
Missions. I found Brother A. H. Lea- 
man of the N. C. A. Board in the begin- 
ning of the work of the new thirty-four 
thousand dollar mission building soon to 
be erected. The large attendance at the 
two mission buildings now being used 
showed the crying need for this build- 
ing. The Mennonite Mission at 2812 
Lincoln Avenue, had grown much dur- 
ing the year. A contribution in aid of 
our work was kindly made by friends 
there as also at the twenty-sixth street 
mission where the falling rain lessened 
the attendance. A Sabbath spent at 
Melrose Park, Illinois, brought me in 
touch with many new friends of the Free 
Methodist church. A meeting in the 
Lake View Swedish Congregational 
church was well attended as was a meet- 
ing in the Third Christian Reformed 
church. As heretofore Bethany Bible 
School, Church of the Brethren, gave 
opportunity to address a large number 
of young gentlemen and ladies prepar- 
ing for the greatest work given to man. 
Their new building is nearing comple- 
tion and is to help in every enlarging 



work there undertaken. A select com- 
pany of Christian friends heard my 
message in the Church of the Brethren, 
Llgin, Illinois, as likewise in the Free 
Methodist church, Harvey, Illinois. It 
was a great pleasure to have with us at 
the Elgin meeting our staunch friend, 
Elder D. L. Miller, now in his seventy- 
seventh year. He now has his home in 
Elgin. 

Wheaton, Elmhurst, Glenview and 
other adjacent Illinois towns have been 
visited with good results. I have stopped 
at the new Y. M. C. A. hotel in Chicago 
and can highly recommend it to those 
wishing a clean cheery stopping place at 
reasonable rate. I regretted to hear a 
speaker in this hotel addressing a large 
audience of men speak complimentary of 
the infidelity which he said was being 
taught in the Army. He told of a Cath- 
olic priest on the battle front who was 
holding a cross before a dying soldier 
when the priest himself was shot dead. 
A Jewish Rabbi, he said, then held the 
cross before the soldier. He thought it 
would not make much difference to God 
whether the soldier died with an oath or 
a prayer on his lips, as long as he was 
doing his duty. The speaker thought 
that the war had greatly increased, what 
he was pleased to term, liberality in reli- 
gious matters. Of course to one be- 
lieving Jesus Christ to be the only way. 
truth and life this kind of teaching does 
not seem like liberality, but infidelity. 
The writer does not think the noble 
workers of the Y. M. C. A. whose love 
for Christianity prompts to self sacrific- 
ing service will endorse such sentiments. 
They sound like the lodge notion of a 
"universal religion" which does not ex- 
ist. 



What an astonishing thing is sin. 
which maketh the God of love and Fath- 
er of mercies an enemy to His creatures. 
and which could only be purged by the 
Blood of the Son of God! Though all 
must believe this who believe the Bible, 
yet the exceeding sinfulness of sin is but 
weakly apprehended by those who have 
the deepest sense of it. and will never 
be fully known in this world. — Thomas 
Adam. 



60 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



STANDARD WORKS 



ON 



Secret Societies 

FOR SALE BY THE 

National Christian Association, 



HOW TO ORDER: 

PRICES quoted in this catalogue include car- 
riage prepaid by mail. Orders by insured mail, 
5c extra. 

TERMS— rCash with order. We do not wish 
to open accounts with individuals. When prices 
are not known, send sufficient and any balance 
will be returned to you. 

C. O. D. orders will not be filled unless $1.00 
accompanies the order. No books shipped on 
approval. 

REMIT by Bank Draft on Chicago or New 
York, or by Post Office or Express Money Or- 
ders. Personal checks should have 5c extra added 
for collection. 

WRITE your name and address plainly and in 
full, giving street number, post office box, R. 
F. D. number and box, and when ordering by 
express, give your express office if it is differ- 
ent from your post office address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASS'N. 

350 W. MADISON STREET. CHICAGO, ILL. 



STANDARD BOOKS 
ON FREEMASONRY 



FINNEY ON MASONRY, 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

FREEMASONRY: An Interpretation. 

By Martin L. Wagner, pastor of St. Johns 
English Evangelical Lutheran Church Dayton, 
Ohio, with an introduction by the Rev. G. H. 
Gerberding, D. D., professor of Practical Theol- 
ogy in the Theological Seminary of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church at Chicago, Illinois. 
This is a new book, and is a candid discussion 
of the institution Freemasonry, and offers an 
interpretation of its veiled expressions, art, 
speech, religion and ethics, and of_ its symbols, 
emblems and ceremonies. This interpretation is 
based upon hints given and statements made 
by the highest Masonic authorities and tested 
in the light of sources from which these claim 
that Freemasonry is derived. Cloth, 560 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

MASONIC TEMPLES. 

A clear discussion of the religion of Masonry, 
by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. Contents: What is a 
Temple? Not Other Religions But the Christian 
Religion. The Lodge Bible Not the Christian 
Bible. The Masonic Religion Not the Christian 
Religion. Who or What is the Masonic God? 
The Roman Pantheon. Lodge Morals and Chris- 
tian Morals. 32 pages. 5 cents. $3.50 per hun- 
dred. 



FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and nnny 
lotes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
khe truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, GO cents. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master oi" 
Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book 
gives the work and ritual of Blue Lodge 
Masonry, the proper position of each officer 
in the Lodge-room, order of opening and clos- 
ing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry." Illustrated 
with 85 engravings. Contains the "unwrit- 
ten" work. New Revised Edition, enlarged 
to 275 pages; flexible cloth $1.00. paper 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and 
Illustrations. It gives the correct method of 
conferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the 
oaths, obligations, signs, grips and passwords. 
All of which are correct and can be relied upon. 
The accuracy of this work has been attested by 
high and unimpeachable Masonic authority. 
Cloth, $1.25; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Tex set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 



June, 1918 



CHR] ST I A N C Y N O SU R E 



61 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages in cloth, $1.50; paper, $1.00. 

EXPLANATORY. 
"Handbook of Freemasonry" and "Chap- 
ter Degrees," and "Knight Templarism 
Illustrated" give the 13 degrees of the York 
Rite. There are 33 degrees in the Scotch- 
Rite, but the first three degrees as given 
in the "Handbook of Freemasonry" belong 
to both the York and Scotch Rites. These 
five books give 43 different degrees without 
duplicating. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition. 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
;hree Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
Bhipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
foil roan, flap, $2.50. 

ADOPTIVE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the 
five degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas 
Lowe, comprising the uegrees of Jephthah's 
Daughter, Ruth, Esther, Martha, and Electa, and 
known as the Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, 
Wife's Degree, Sister's Degree and the Benevolent 

FREEMASONRY EXPOSED 

By Capt. William Morgan. The genuine 
old Morgan Book; republished with engrav- 
ings, showing the lodge room, dress of can- 
didates, signs, due-guards, grips, etc. This 
revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
murdered the author for writing it. 25 cents. 

MAH-HAH-BONE. 

Comprising "The Master's Carpet," which 
illustrates and explains the religious symbolism 
of the first three degrees of Freemasonry, and the 
"Hand-Book of Freemasonry," a complete and ac- 
curate exposure of the three degrees of Ancient 
Craft Masonry. By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master 
of Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago, Illinois. A 
volume of 679 pages, Cloth, $1.50; 

THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. Explains the true 
Bource and religious meaning of every symbol of 
the Blue Lodge, showing the basis on which the 
ritual is founded. By careful perusal of this 
work a thorough knowledge of the spiritual prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry can be obtained. Every 
Mason, every person contemplating becoming a 
member of the fraternity, and even those who 
are indifferent on the subject, should procure and 
mrpfuily read this book. 406 pages, illustrated 
with 50 engravings. 75 cents. 

FREEMASONRY AT A GLANCE. 

Containing the illustrated secrets of thirteen 
degrees of Freemasonry; Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Commandery degrees. Also the 
ceremonies, signs, grips, passwords, etc., de- 
scribed and illustrated. 

Paper cover, 10 cents each. 



OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREE.' 
OP FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 
AMERICAN FREEMASONRY 

"A Study in American Freemasonry," based 
upon Pike's "Morals and Dogma of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite," "Mackey's Masonic 
Ritualist," "The Encyclopaedia of Freemason- 
ry" and other American masonic standard 
works. By Arthur Preuss, Editor of the Cath- 
olic Fortnightly Review. Among the chapters 
in this book are: "Is American Masonry a Re- 
ligion?" "The God of American Freemasonry," 
"American Freemasonry and the Kabbalistic 
Jehovah," "American Freemasonry and the Bi- 
ble," "Masonic Morality," etc. Cloth, 433 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

GRAND LODGE VS. JUDGE WHITNEY. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of Bel 
videre Masonic Lodge, No. 60 (Illinois), when S. 
L. Keith, a member of his lodge, murdered Ellen 
Slade. Judge Whitney, by attempting to bring 
Keith to justice, brought on himself the ven- 
geance of the lodge ; but he boldly replied to the 
charges against him, and afterwards renounced 
Masonry. 15 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF FREE- 
MASONRY 

As proved in court in the New Berlin trial. 
Also the letter of Hon. Richard Rush, to the 
Anti-Masonic Committee of York Co., Pa., 
May 4th, 1831. The New Berlin Trials began 
in the attempt of Freemasons to prevent pub- 
lic initiations by seceding Masons. These 
trials were held at New Berlin, Chenango Co., 
N. Y., April 13 and 14, 1831. General Augus- 
tus C. Welsh, Sheriff of the County, and oth- 
er adhering Freemasons swore to the truth- 
ful revelation of the Oaths and Penalties 
Single Copy, 10 cents. 

HISTORY OF THE ABDUCTION AND MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 
As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 25 
cents. 

HON. THURLOW WEED ON THE MORGAN 
ABDUCTION. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Captain Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal 
to Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario, the discovery of the body at Oak Orchard 
Creek and the two inquests thereon. Mr. Weed 
testifies from his own personal knowledge of these 
Thrilling events. This pamphlet also contains an 
mgraving of the monument and statue erected to 
the memory of the martyred Morgan at Batavia, 
N. Y., and unveiled in September, 1882, for which 
occasion Mr. Weed's statement was originally pre- 
pared 5 cents. 
EX-PREfei^iJi^T JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. There are only a few of 
these books in print, and they are not in the best 
condition. They can be furnished, in paper, at 
50 cents a copy. 

VALANCE'S CONFESSION OF THE MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

This confession of Henry L. "Valance, one 
of the three Freemasons who drowned Mor- 
gan in the Niagara River, was taken from 
the lips of the dying man by Dr. Jolln C. 
Emery, of Racine County, Wisconsin, in 1848. 
The confession bears clear evidence of truth- 
fulness. Single copy, 10 cents. 



62 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



WAS WASHINGTON A MASONT 

<& By President Charles A. Blanchard. This 
is the best contribution yet written on the 
question of Washington's relation to Free- 
masonry. 10 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO- 
PATRIOTS OPPOSED TO SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 

This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
3tatesmen and their testimonies vindicating them 
from any charge of adherence to secret societies. 
10 tents. 

WASHINGTON. 

What kind of a Freemason was he? 4 pages; 
postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents; a package of 75 
copies for 25 cents. 

AMVMKMS8S OF THE GODS. 

>«*« *. K. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
(etgPtjholoKy of Rome, Greece. Egypt, India, l'ersia, 
.irJUWHia. Scandinavia, Africa and America, showino 
^c ~z:z.~:c~ and unity of the past and preseiTJ 
systems. The idolatrous vorship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 10 
cents. 

MISCELLANEOUS 



MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
Wheaton College, President National Christian As- 
sociation, Ex-President Sabbath Association of 
Illinois, etc. 

A brief treatise for busy people and especially 
intended for ministers and teachers. 

Part first answers objections and clears away 
the obstacles to a candid consideration of the 
fundamental questions involved. Part second 
treats of Freemasonry as the key to the whole 
subject. Part third relates to subsidiary organ- 
izations, — industrial, insurance, temperance and 
other lodges. Part fourth considers important 
Questions growing out of this discussion. 320 

FOLLY, EXPENSE AND DANGER OF SE- 
CRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, President of Whea- 
ton College. They may be rudely classified as 
religious ; e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfel- 
lowship, the Knights of Pythias, etc. ; political, ar 
the Know-Nothings, Knights of the Golden Circle 
the Order of American Deputies, the Ku Kit*- 
Klan, the White League, etc. ; industrial, as the 
unions of carpenters, bricklayers, conductors, en 
gineers, etc. ; insurance, as the Royal Arcanum, t:t 
Modern Woodmen, the Order of the Iron Hall, tl» 
Order of United American Mechanics, etc. : an'a 
social, as the college fraternities. 5 cents. 

SECRE1 SOCIETIES ILLUSTRATED. 

Comprising the so-called "secrets" (the 
signs, grips, pass-words, emblems, etc.) of 
Freemasonry (Blue Lodge and to the thirteenth 
degree of the American Rite, and the Scottish 
Rite), Adoptive Masonry (the Eastern Star), 
Oddfellowship (Lodge, Encampment, and Re- 
bekah degrees), the Good Templars, Temple of 
Honor, United Sons of Industry, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Grange. Over 250 cuts; 99 
pages; paper cover, 35 cents. 

REVISED ODDFEL-uOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. E, a, 
Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, and 
guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a sketch 
of the "risiu, nistory and character of the order, 
over one hundred foot-note quotations from stand- 
ard authorities, showing the character and teach- 
ings of the order, and an analysis of each degree 
by President J. Blanchard. This ritual corre- 
sponds exactly with the "Charge Books" furnished 
by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Cloth, $1.50: 
paper cover, $1.00. 



REVISED KEBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting Rebekah Lodges, and Installation of Officers 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Clotii, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL- 

"jsu^piete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
"«?!ary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funera) 
ceremonies, odes and h-mns. 35 cents. 

ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA 

1899 Ritual as printed by J. W. Franks & 
Sons, Peoria, Illinois. This order is the fe« 
male auxiliary of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 10 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, Chiefs 
Degree ; with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 oent*; 
«>aper, 35 cents, 

EXPOSITION OF THE GRANGE 

Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated 
with engravings, showing lodge room, signs 
signals, etc. 35 cents. 

FARMER'S EDUCATIONAL AND CO-OP- 
ERATIVE UNION OF AMERICA 

Initiation ceremonies; obligation; final 
charge; chaplain introduced; burial cere- 
mony, etc., etc. 5 cents. 

A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. \. Searvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a rery excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience* 
ake from this order. 10 cents. 

GOOD TEMFLARISM ILLUSTRATED 

A full and accurate exposition of the de- 
grees of the Lodge, Temple and Council, with 
engravings showing the signs, grips, etc. 25 
cents. 

THE FORESTERS ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ilustrated ritual with Installa- 
tion Ceremonies of the United Order of Forest- 
ers, formerly known as the Independent Order 
of Foresters. 

Paper cover, 35 cents each. 

KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

The complete illustrated ritual and secrets of 
the order as used in 1880. 
Paper cover, 35 cents each. 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



63 



LIGHT ON THE LAST DAYS 

A book for the times! Being familiar studies 
in the book of Revelation. By President Charles 
A. Blanchard, D. D., of Wheaton College. We 
are approaching the times with which this book 
particularly deals. God has written these words 
for the help of His people in all ages, but they 
are of special importance to us and those who 
succeed us. Cloth, 152 pages. Price 75 cents 
net. By mall 85 cents. 

SECRET SOCIETIES, ANCIENT AND MOD 
ERN. 

Contents : The Antiquity of Secret Societies, 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Masoi I 
Filmore's and Webster's Deference to Masonry in 
the United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustra- 
tion. The Conclusion. 50 cents. 

COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their customs, character, and efforts for their 
suppression. Containing the opinions of many 
college presidents, and others, and a full account 
of the murder of Mortimer Leggett. Compiled 
ind edited by H. L. Kellogg. 25 cents. 

RONAYNE'S REMINISCENCES, 

Being an autobiography of his life and re- 
nunciation of Romanism and Freemasonry. 
(Mr. E. Ronayne is the author of the Handbook 
of Freemasonry; the Master's Carpet, Etc.) 
Cloth cover, 445 pages, price, 75 cents. 



FOR CHRISTIANS ONLY 



ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. Church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
In this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Vr/ Robert Armstrong. 16 pages; 5 cents. 

ODD-FELLOWSHIP JUDGED 

by its own utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By Rev. J. H. 
Brockman. Cloth, 50 cents; paper cover, 25 cents. 

This is an exceedingly interesting, clear dis- 
cussion of the character of Odd-Fellowship, in th& 
form of a dialogue. 

SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y, This is a very clear 
presentation of the objections to all secret so- 
cieties, and to Masonry especially, that are appar- 
ent to all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
a most convincing argument against the Lodge. 
16 pages; 5 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
TIES. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
of Christian churches to disfellowship secret so- 
cities. 10 cents. 



ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THL 
INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repuJ'ate them. 
5 cents. 

THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST 

By Richard Horton. The Secret Emplrs 
is a subject of prophecy. "Examine," says 
the author, "the thirteenth chapter of Reve- 
latlon." Gibbon's history of the Roman Em- 
pire is the history of the Beast; Rebold'a 
"History of Freemasonry" is the history of 
the Image. Cloth, 60 centa. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument agnini-t fellow- 
shiping Freemasons in t*e Christian Church. 10 
cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor United Pres 
byterlan church. Four strong objections to 
Masonry, especially as an antichristian religion, 
justifying exclusion of adhering Masons from fel 
lowship in the Christian church, lb" pages ; 5 nenta. 

MASONIC SALVATION 

As taught by its standard authors. Compiled 
from standard Masonic works as proof of the 
proposition that "Freemasonry claims to be a 
religion that saves men from all sin, and purifies 
them for heaven." 20 cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THE 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," Atlanta, Ga. l(i pages; 
5 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District, Northwestern Iowa Conference 
of the M. E. church — a seceding Master Mason. 
5 cents. 

BETWEEN TWO OPINIONS. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of "Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc. Every one who loves to 
read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
pression, pure in thought, interesting in narrative, 
should read this book upon the power of secret 
societies in politics, and the remedy. 389 pages ; 
cloth, 50 cents. 

THE MYSTIC TIE; 

Or Freemasonry a League with the Devil. 
This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
Cook and wife, of Elkhart, Ind., for refusing to 
suDport a "o.verend Freemason. 15 oer+3. 

MOODY CHURCH TESTIMONIALS. 

This valuable booklet contains the brief testi- 
monies as to organized secretism of nearly all 
the pastors, assi3tant pastors and pulpit sup- 
plies of the Moody Church, Chicago, during- the 
first fifty years of its existence. 64 pages. 15 
cents. 

CONGREGATIONAL TESTIMONIES. 

Respecting the character and claims of secret 
societies. This book contains the testimonies of 
leading Congregationalists, East and West, with 
portraits of many well-known men. 55 pages : 
heavy paper cover. 15 cents. 

THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH, 

or A Woman's Victory. 
A story of a church in which the lodge influ- 
ence is felt in its prayer meetings and other ac 
tiv'tiea. 24 pages and cover. Price 5 centa. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

A discussion of their character and claims, 
by Rev. David MacDill, Pres. J. Elanchard and 
Rev. Edward Beecher. 96 pages; paper ccver; 
15 'cents each. 



64 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1918 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
Penalties ; Are Masonic Penalties Ever Enforced J 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers; Disloyalty to Country; Our Re- 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
16 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

THE OPEN CONFESSION 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address on the rela- 
tion of the Christian, and especially the Chris- 
tian minister, to the secret oath-bound lodge. 
16 pages; postpaid 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

MY REASONS 

For Not Joining the Masonic Fraternity, by 
Rev. R. A. Torrey, D. D., Dean of the Bible 
Institute of Los Angeles. 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in Them? 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN " ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Ofher Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow? 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
Fatherhood of God," Discussed and Refuted. 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A package 
Of 75 for 25 cents. 
EXPERIENCE OP STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddfellowship? Ought Christians to 
Perform Acts of Beneficence and Charity as Odd- 
fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
man. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a pack- 
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ARE INSURANCE LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra 
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BAPTIST TESTIMONIES. 

From Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D., Rev. A. JT. 
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others. 8 pages; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
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PATRIOT AND THE LODGE. 

By Pres. C. A. Blanchard. From a patriotic 
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COLLEGE FRATERNITIES. 

Consisting of testimonies of prominent edu- 
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FRATERNITIES IN STATE SCHOOLS. 

By Pres. C. A. Blanchard. A discussion of 
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VOR WOMEN WHO THINK 

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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 6 pages; post- 
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PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHRl©. 
TIANS FROM LODGES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
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CHURCH AND LODGE. 

An Address Delivered at Mr. Moody's "Con= 
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ODDFELLOWSHIP A RELIGIOUS INSTI* 
TTJTION 

And Rival of the Christian Church. 8 pages; 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

By Col. Ceorge R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
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GRACIOUSLY DELIVERED 

From Seven Secret Societies. By Rev. E. G. 
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ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE, 

Secret Societies in Relation to the Home. 
By Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D., pastor of Chicago 
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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haney, a minister and evangelist 
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objections to the Lodge. A Christian Lodge Im- 
possible. Is the Lodge a Help or a Hindrance 
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WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWSY 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
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THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, May 15, 1902. 

The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
The Greatest Masons are Our Teachers. Is Free- 
masonry a Religion ? Is the Masonic Religion Chris- 
tian? What Kind of Religion is It? Marks of 
Demon Worship. Our Duty. 24 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy, or $1.00 per hundred. 

MODERN PROPHETS OF BAAL. 

Or, Watchmen on Zion's Walls. By President 
C. A. Blanchard. A tract for ministers. "If 
we say Lord to any one who is not God, then 
we are worshippers of Baal, and if we, who are 
religious teachers, call any one Lord except the 
true God, then we are prophets of Baal." It 
shows the real relation of Masonic ministers to 
a heathen system, and gives the reasons why 
Christian preachers become prophets of Baal. 

In the appendix is a chapter on Masonic The- 
ology, taken from Mackey's "Masonic Ritualist"; 
and also "A Word to Bible Students," by Dean 
J. M. Gray, D. D., of the Moody Bible Institute. 
32 pages. Postpaid, 5 cents a copy; per hundred, 
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A package containing 20 or more of the above tract* 
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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

850 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



THE OPEN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address steno- 
graphically reported for the National Christian 
Association at its Annual Meeting, April 8, 1910. 

The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath- bound 
lodge. 

A Personsl Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Cray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons.— This Is 
within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
is of fundamental importance. 

Describing a Mighty Adversary. — Not merely 
an evil Influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and Is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System.— Showing 
that it is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 2 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS. 

^These consist of 20 different tracts, envelope 
size, of from four to 3ixteen pages each. Some 
of them are: Why I Left the Kebekah Lodge. 
Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left th« 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merrltt. the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
Secret Societies. The Church and the Lodge. 
Baptist Testimonies. Lodge Religion. The 
"Good Man" Argument. Masonic Obligations, 
Catechism of Oddfellowship. Oddfellowship a 
Religious Institution. Why Do Men Remain 
Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
Association. Two Nights in a Lodge Room. 
The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial Services, 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities In 
State Schools. For Women Who Think— Wom- 
en s Lodges. The Patriot and the Lodge. 
Each. 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madison St CHICAGO. ILL. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
connection in all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of dimission." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
shows almost exclusively from Quotations of prominent Woodmen, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
In the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7%. It contains four Illustrations of 
secret society paraphernalia. The list price is 25 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St., Chicago 



MODERN PROPHETS of BAAL 

OR 

WATCHMEN on ZION'S WALLS 

By President C. A. Blanchard. 

This is a tract especially intended for ministers. The term Baalism in referring to 
Masonry is used figuratively. " If we say Lord to any one who is not God, then we 
are worshipers of Baal and if we, who are religious teachers, call any one Lord 
except the true God, then we are prophets of Baal." This tract, in addition to setting 
forth the real relation of Masonic ministers to a heathen system, also gives the reasons 
why Christian preachers become prophets of Baal. 

In the appendix there is a chapter on Masonic Theology, taken from Mackey's "Masonic 
Ritualist", the author being the well known Past General Grand High Priest of the General 
Grand Chapter of the United States. There is also A Word to Bible Students, by Dean 
J. M. Gray, D. D., of the Moody Bible Institute, and there is a page of Bible quotations 
which are important in this connection. 

Thirty-two pages; Single copies three cents, per hundred, $2.00 postpaid. 



Address 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago Ills. 



Notice i dersl— When you flni*„ reading this magasine place a l-<*nt stamp on this notice. *^<J ■•*•••• 

, and it will be placed In the hands of our soldiers or sailors at the front No wrapplac. *o 



Mty postal employee. 

address. A. S. BURLESON. Postmaster General 




VOL. LI. 



CHICAGO, JULY, 1918 



Number 3 




Che men iDbo sue- 
ceed best in public 
life are tbose u)bo 
take tbe risk of 
standing by tbeir 
own convictions 

Garfield 




OFFICIAL ORGAN* NATIONAL CHRUTIAN AJTOCIATION 
10 CENTJ" A COPY EJTABLIJHED 1868 1.00 A YEAR. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



W1L I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 



in advance, $1.00; three 
twenty-five cents; single 



PRICE— Per year, 
months, on trial, 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to PRIENT>S. In such cases, if \ce ars advised 
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make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
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Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
lit the Post Office at Chicago, HI., under Act of 
ttaixa 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Sufficiency of the Christian Church, by 

Rev. J. D. Hartzler 65 

A Y. M. C. A. Retreat, by James E. 

Phillips. . '. 69 

The Burro Trail, Illustration 70 

The Wooden Cross, Illustration. . 70 

Moody Church Missionary Rally 71 

The Cjmosure's Worth 71 

Sound Strategy — Sunday School Times.. 71 

The Drift of the Times, by George C. 

Reed 72 

Loans to Farmers 76 

Frats Start Girls Smoking 76 

"Rough Stuff" — Evening World-Herald. . 76 

Spanker Explodes with Dire Result Dur- 
ing Initiation — World-Herald 77 

Decision for the Truth, by Charles H. 

Spurgeon 78 

The Eastern Star, Miss Ella N. Drake... 80 

Book Review : "What Do the Prophets 

Say?" 81 

"Woodmen Circle" Lawsuit — The Bee, 

Omaha, Nebr. 82 

School Secret Societies — Washington, 

D. C, Times 82 



The Best Investment in the World. — Se- 
lected 82 

The First General Russian Conference.. 83 

Travesty of a Sacred Classic 84 

The Knights of Malta — The Fortnightly 

Review 84 

Confiscation 85 

Opening and Conclusion 85 

Plural of Knight Templar 86 

Dr. MacArthur's Admonition 86 

News of Our Work. 
Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 87 

Southern Agent's Letter, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson 87 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 88 

Tennessee, Catholicism, and Masonrv.. 90 
The Church of God in Christ— The 

Whole Truth 91 

Federalizing Railroad Management 91 

Standard Works on Secret Societies 92 

"The Polestar". Cover 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 
GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Heemstra ; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomas C. 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kittils- 
by, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Leaman, 
George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below: 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 251a 14th St., 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck. Grafton, CaHf. 

£3d. G. B. Crockett. Dermott Ark. 



Vol. LI, No, 3. 



CHICAGO 



July, 1918 





There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 


CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 


Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 





In a letter from Rev. M. P. F. Doer- 
inarm, in whose church our Annual 
Meeting was held on May 2ist, last, ap- 
pears the following encouraging words : 
"As far as I am able to learn, the meet- 
ing here of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation was a decided success. The ad- 
dresses of the evening were very much 
appreciated by the good sized audience 
present and also by some secret society 
men who showed that some of the truths 
uttered went home. I am only sorry 
that a larger number of the latter class 
were not present at our Annual Meeting 
because of their need and the admirable 
way in which needed facts were pre- 
sented." 



SUFFICIENCY OF THE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH. 

JOHN E. HARTZLER, EX-PRESIDENT 

GOSHEN COLLEGE. 
An address by Rev. John E. Hartzler, of 
Goshen, Indiana, delivered at the annual 
meeting of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, in Blue Island, Illinois, May 21, 1918. 
We are standing on the border line 

between the two greatest centuries the 
world has ever known. The 20th cen- 
tury, just passing, is characterized by 
the greatest mechanical inventions, 
means of travel and communication and 
labor-saving devices that the world has 
yet known. All this has come to mean 
friction and need of adjustment in so- 
cial, religious, industrial and economic 
affairs. The machine has taken the place 
of the tool. Power has. taken the place 
of skilled workmanship. Every man 
looks out for number one. Progress in 
social, economic, religious and educa- 
tional matters have not kept pace with 



progress in invention and this is one of 
the causes of the present world war. 
The whole world has been thrown to- 
gether through invention from one great 
foreign world to one- great neighborhood 
in which men of all classes, colors and 
races touch elbows. 

The 20th century, if this world will 
continue, must be characterized by great 
social, religious, economic and educa- 
tional reconstruction. Unless our re- 
ligious and industrial ethics make haste 
early and keep abreast with the world 
about us in which we live, we can ex- 
pect nothing less than long continued 
wars in the human race. This means 
that the church is under special obliga- 
tion. The greatest compliment ever paid 
to the church has been paid during the 
past four years. Every people, Chris- 
tian and non-Christian, have thrown be- 
fore the Church the question : What is 
wrong with Christianity? Where is the 
Church? The heathen expected better 
things of us than this. We have disap- 
pointed the world. We must somehow 
re-establish our credit. 

The Christian Church has by no means 
been perfect, yet she has left the most 
glorious record. Her pathway is trace- 
able across the great Atlantic, thru Eng- 
land. Europe, Asia Minor, all the way 
to the cradle in Bethlehem. Her path- 
way is marked with institutions of learn- 
ing, love and mercy. Monuments in 
noble manhood and womanhood mark 
her entire pathway from the first day 



66 



christian Cynosure 



July, 1918. 



that she set foot upon this sin cursed 
earth. Her light, as it makes its way 
across the centuries lighting men in the 
pathway of love and service is eclipsed 
by no other. Her pillars stand firm on 
the "Rock of Ages" and her noble 
heights reach two eternities. In God's 
established order, the Church, we shall 
find supplied our religious, ethical and 
moral needs. For this reason I speak to 
you this evening on the* subject: 
The All Sufficient Church. 

You have asked me to discuss the re- 
lationship between the Lodge and the 
Church. In one word I would say that 
there is, there can be, no vital relation. 
The Lodge is born of a pagan mother ; 
the Church is born of heaven. The 
Lodge has crept into a few church gar- 
ments but she has bursted them badly. 
The pagan spotted skin appears. The 
Lodge and the Church are not near 
enough together to be in speaking dis- 
tance and if they were, neither one would 
understand the language of the other. A 
bull dog and a child have some things in 
common but they cannot be related to 
the same mother. You may put a skirt 
on the dog but the first time he sees a cat 
he forgets to act human. You may put 
the Bible in the lodge room, but when 
the "goat" comes in you have no Sun- 
day School or prayer meeting. 

There are certain elements of appeal 
in the Lodge which in themselves are 
good for the simple reason that they 
have been borrowed from the Church. 
These I shall mention in brief : 

i. The Element of Security. Hu- 
man nature calls for security from the 
ills and misfortunes of life and the Lodge 
ofTers its members certain forms of se- 
curity, financial, social and in many cases 
religious. 

2. The Element of Service. The 
Lodge renders certain forms of service, 
again borrowed from the Church. The 
Lodge does bury the dead. So does the 



Church. The Lodge does in a degree aid 
their members in distress. So does the 
Church. 

3. The Element of Sacrifice. There 
is an element of self-denial in the Lodge. 
Certain degrees of sacrifice are evident. 
Garments again borrowed from the 
Church. But the best that can be said 
of their sacrifices is that it is a business 
proposition, a moral obligation from a 
business standpoint. "You help me and 
I'll help you." 

4. The Element of Fellowship. The 
social affairs of the Lodge appeal to 
many. Man is a social creature and the 
Creator recognized this from the begin- 
ning. He saw that it was not good for 
man to be alone but He failed to make 
an easy riding goat to initiate him into 
the Lodge. Fellowship is a great human 
characteristic and the Lodge appeals 
from this angle. 

Fundamentals in the Church. 

There are certain fundamentals in the 
Christian Church worthy of note at this 
point evidencing the fact that the Church 
is the moral equivalent of the Lodge. 
If it can be shown that the Church con- 
tains all the fundamentals of the Lodge 
worth-while, and more, it then becomes 
evident that there is no real need for the 
existence of the Lodge. This is my 
contention, viz., that the Church is the 
moral equivalent of the Lodge and the 
proper administration of her affairs will 
make the Lodge an institution which is 
of no moral, educational, social or re- 
ligious necessity. 

1. Security for Present and Future 
Life. Christianity is something for this 
life; it is something to live by. The 
Church offers security for the present in 
right living as well as security for the 
future. What the Lodge gives in coun- 
terfeit the Church gives in reality. The 
Church connects time with eternity; she 
makes time the doorway to eternity and 
uses time in the security of eternity. The 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



67 



Lodge goes with you to the grave and 
says, "Good-bye." 

2. Service in Human Welfare. No 
field of service is so large, so fruitful, 
so universal, and so opportune as that 
offered by the Church. The Lodge offers 
a truck patch ; the Church the great ex- 
tended fields of the human family. The 
Lodge serves the select few, the Church 
the whole world. Christianity is not a 
religion of "be good," but one of "do 
good." The will of God as experienced 
by Jesus was that which was for the 
good of man, the good of the community. 
Again what the Lodge offers in counter- 
feit the Church offers in reality. 

3. Sacrifice for Truth and Democ- 
racy. Vicarious suffering is funda- 
mental in Christianity. Redemption of 
man is the great theme of the Bible. 
Less than 1,000 words are used to tell 
the story of creation, but all the rest of 
the Bible is given to the story of the 
redemption of man. Man is a big thing 
in the eyes of God ; the biggest thing He 
ever made. The Church stands for the 
truth, and sacrifices for the same. The 
great aim of the Gospel is to give to 
every man equal opportunity to the 
things that make for joy and happiness 
in life ; in other words, the Church stands 
for democracy in this that it offers equal 
opportunity to all men. Democracy is 
foreign to the lodge. 

4. Brotherhood of Man. The Church 
recognizes the worth of all men. Fellow- 
ship is a great principle in Christianity. 
What the Lodge does in counterfeit the 
Church does in reality. Church doors 
are open to all men ; no class distinc- 
tions ; nothing secret. The model prayer 
says : "Our Father . . ." — a common 
father to all men. 

A certain man was boasting to his 
neighbor recently because his good wife 
had called him a "model" husband. A 
friend advised him to look up the term 



in a dictionary. So he did and he found 
"model" defined as "a small imitation of 
the real thing." So I say the Lodge is a 
small imitation of the real thing. 

Since all the good things of the Lodge 
can be traced directly to the Church, and 
inasmuch as the Church offers these on 
an equal basis to all men, and on a high 
ethical and religious plain, it becomes 
evident that 

The Lodge Performs No Essential Function 
Today 

The Lodge performs no function of 
worth which the Church cannot. It be- 
comes merely an institutional parasite 
and should be eliminated entirely, and 
for the following reasons : 

1. The Lodge is inadequate to per- 
form permanent service because limited 
in principles. Her principles are such 
that decidedly prohibit her in doing last- 
ing good. Secrecy, unethical conduct, 
etc., simply unfit the Lodge for doing 
anything of essential worth. 

2. The Lodge is impractical being 
narrow and inefficient. The doors are 
closed to the millions who need help. 
The select few are admitted, the rest are 
rejected. Try to name for yourself the 
important social, educational, industrial 
or religious monuments which the Lodge 
has erected. They have done nothing of 
universal value. The institution is im- 
practical. 

3. The Lodge is Unnecessary. The 
Church has all the elements of the Lodge 
worth while. Counterfeit money is of 
no value to our country ; neither is a 
counterfeit institution. If men desire 
only to live in sin and disregard the 
Church they may as well spend their 
time and money in the Lodge as any- 
where else. But for Christian men and 
women to hold membership in these 
Christ rejected institutions is out of the 
question. The Lodge does not neglect 
Christ — it rejects him. What need have 
we for any institution which makes spe- 



68 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



cial effort to reject Christ? None what- 
soever. 

The Sufficiency of the Church. 

I do not ask any man to give up his 
Lodge without offering to him something 
which offers all the good he is leaving 
and infinitely more. I should not ask a 
man to give up sinning unless I have 
something of more value to offer. And 
so I have when I ask that the Lodge be 
given up today. The church gives op- 
portunity for the exercise of all those 
human qualities of security, service, sac- 
rifice and fellowship, and then, free from 
all the moral corruption found in the 
modern Lodge. The Church is the 
moral equivalent and sufficient, for — 

i. She supplies all the good that can 
be found in the Lodge. Show me a good 
thing in the Lodge which cannot be 
traced to the Church as one of her fun- 
damental duties and I have nothing more 
to say against the Lodge. 

2. She supplies infinitely more good 
than the Lodge. The Church goes the 
"second mile," the third, the fourth. The 
Lodge goes the first because it must. 
The church goes the third and fourth, 
and as many more as necessary, because 
she loves. The Church is God's cus- 
todian of His goods- on earth. The 
Lodge has taken some of his goods. The 
trouble is she has not taken enough. 
To take enough would mean the elim- 
ination of the Lodge. 

3. She supplies the good on a high 
moral and ethical plane. No blindfolds, 
goat riding, caskets with skeletons, 
needed to initiate one into the Church. 
The morals of the average Lodge room 
are sufficient to condemn the whole sys- 
tem and Lodge men are aware of this. 
"For it is a shame even to speak of 
those things which are done of them in 
secret." Few men, if any, dare tell their 
wives what happens in the Lodge room. 
When a man ties himself up with an 
organization which separates him from 



his wife he has sinned against God and 
his home. The Church provides good 
on a moral and ethical plane before the 
eyes of all men. 

4. She is open to all men on equal 
terms. No select class. "Come unto 
me, all ye that labor . . ." is the invita- 
tion of the Church. The treasures of 
heaven open to all men on equal terms 
through the Church. No physical, so- 
cial, financial tests required; regenera- 
tion of heart and obedience to God are 
in reach of all men alike. 

5. She bears the stamp of Divine 
approval. This alone is worth every- 
thing. Imagine God placing his hand of 
approval on the service of a drunken, 
unbelieving Lodge officer, in the initia- 
tion into his lodge of a Christian pro- 
fessing man ! Where did God say, "Up- 
on this rock will I build my Lodge and 
the gates of hell shall not prevail against 
it"? God's stamp of approval is on the 
Church. 

No Vital Relation Possible. 
So, I say in conclusion that there can 
be no vital relation between the Lodge 
and the Christian Church. The Church 
cannot afford to recognize this institution 
if she would retain her power for serv- 
ice. Come out from among them and be 
ye separate and touch not the unclean 
thing is the voice of God to the Church. 
The great problems of reconstruction and 
democracy after the war must be worked 
out by the Church. The Church must 
repent, before God can give us victory. 
We have been too closely allied with the 
evil of this world. Many congregations 
have been killed by the Lodge. The 
Church must move toward her salvation 
and that salvation is forward, not back- 
ward. She must have clean hands if 
she would bear the vessel of the Lord. 
When the boys come back from France 
will they find a religious leadership that 
is clean and upright? Will they find a 
Church which will command their re- 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



69 



spect? They are now seeing the greatest 
tragedy the world has ever witnessed. 
Unless the Church can produce the lead- 
ership this great mass of humanity wit- 
nessing the war will take a course which 
will bear unwelcome fruit in the genera- 
tions to come. Will the Church miss her 
opportunity? We dare not. 



A Y. M. C. A. RETREAT. 

Camp Cody, New Mexico, 

April 15, 1918. 

If the Y. M. C. A. Secretary in the 
army camps continues in his strenuous 
life and long hours, concerned day after 
day and month after month with his 
many problems, how long will he last? 

Some such question as this seems to 
have agitated Headquarters recently and 
to have led to the recommendation that 
once each month the "Y" buildings be 
closed and all the secretaries go to some 
Retreat for rest, recreation and confer- 
ence. And so it was planned that we of 
Camp Cody should hold our first Retreat 
in the Florita Mountains, some twelve or 
fifteen miles distant from the camp, on 
Friday, the 12th of April. 

We had a very interesting experience. 
The trip was made by autos, all arriv- 
ing in fairly good time except one flivver 
which lost its way and finally balked, 
compelling its occupants to come afoot 
several miles to the camp. We went out 
to what is known as Mahoney's Park. At 
the entrance to this place is a little Mexi- 
can village of four or five houses and a 
good well. On account of the well, we 
made our camp beside the road between 
the Mexicans' houses. I doubt if it was 
a very sanitary location, but my opinion 
was not asked. If we had had a milk 
can or something to carry water in, I 
presume we would have camped in a 
different place. Anyway, none of us are 
dead yet. 

This particular place, however, has a 
very interesting feature. On the left side 
of the road, as we are facing the Park, 
is a large rounded piece of granite, fairly 
smooth, protruding out of the ground 
like a big bubble. The Florita range is 
a mixture of granite, limestone and other 
of the softer stones, but the rocks near 



this rounded dome of granite are of the 
softer sort, so that it stands out in re- 
lief on that account. On the top of this 
granite are a number of round holes 
about six or eight inches in diameter and 
varying in depth from three or four 
inches to a foot. When I first saw them 
I thought they must be due to the drip- 
ping of water, but I could not account 
for the presence of enough water to ac- 
complish that in this country, nor could 
I see where it could drip from. Later 
in the day we had a short lecture by one 
of the secretaries, who is a geologist and 
is familiar with all this country, and he 
said that the holes were the old mortars 
of the Apache Indians where they used 
to grind their corn. He said that the In- 
dians always ground their corn up on a 
rock where they could see about them 
while they were doing it, but that the 
Mexicans always chose the low spots. 
Although the Mexicans live within seven- 
ty-five feet of these mortars, there is no 
evidence that they ever use them. 

It was through these mountains that 
the old Chief Geronimo (pronounced 
Heronimo) used to lead his braves. I 
think it was not more than thirty miles 
from this place where he was captured. 
Geronimo was down on the border be- 
tween the United States and Mexico, 
with troops from both nations after him. 
They cornered him in the mountains and 
he surrendered to the American troops, 
because he knew that if he surrendered 
to the Mexicans he would be shot without 
much ceremony. 

To pass the Indian camp into the Park 
we crossed a low elevation and found 
ourselves in a sort of crater, with rocky 
walls rising about two thousand feet on 
every side, except the one where we had 
entered. On the farther side, however, 
was a pass of about 1,500 feet elevation, 
through which a burro trail leads to the 
desert on the other side of the range, and 
also to some mines located not far from 
the summit of the pass. Mahoney's mine 
is one of these and is one of the few 
that has paid to its owners anything to 
speak of. This range is not very rich 
in ore. Before we came into this Park 
we had our lunch, which was prepared 
by two army cooks whom we brought 
along with us. Then, right after lunch, 



70 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



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THE BURRO TRAIL. 

and while we were all feeling good, we 
were lined up for a panorama picture. 

After the picture had been taken we 
seated ourselves, not on the grass, but on 
the sun-baked soil, for a conference. 
Rev. J. E. Ludgate led the devotions. 
Mr. Decker gave the reasons why days 
of outing and conference such as this 
are advised by headquarters ; Mr. Becker 
gave a talk on the geology of the range 
and the mines in it ; Mr. Fry, Acting 
Camp Secretary, gave a talk on the du- 
ties of the "Y" men to themselves, to the 
organization and to the government. One 
or two others spoke along similar lines. 
I suppose the conference lasted an hour, 
but certainly not over an hour and a 
half. 

After the conference we each did as 
we pleased, some climbing the mountains, 
some went down into the little mine close 
at hand, others just rested, and a few 
had a game of volley ball. I should have 
much preferred to have gone into the 
mine, but I was very thirsty and some of 
the men had taken the auto back to the 
well to bring water, and I thought they 
would be back very soon. However, they 
were gone a long while, plenty long 
enough to have permitted me to have 
gone with the others into the mine. Mr. 
Becker, the "Y" man who is a geologist 
and prospector, took the party into the 
mine, so that is an additional reason why 
I regret that I did not go. 

After Mr. Becker's party came out of 
the mine he wanted to go up the "burro 



trail" to the top of the pass, as from 
there the view of the country beyond is 
fine, so five of us made the trip. The 
trail was fairly steep, but the ever-chang- 
ing view, the ravines, the gorges, the 
spires, the coloring on the rocks, the pe- 
culiar vegetation, the brilliant flowers, 
and the impressive massiveness of the 
rock upheaval, with its heart eaten away 
in the thousands and thousands of years 
since that period, made an impression 
upon me such as I had never felt 
before of the mighty power of God 
and how easily He could crumple the 
world in His hand, or from rocks alone 
build that which is of such surpassing 
beauty that the genius and skill of man 
of all ages could never equal. 

From the top of the pass we could see 
the town of Columbus, made famous by 
the recent Mexican raid, and which I 
visited a week ago. We could look away 
beyond it into Old Mexico. There were 
a couple of Mexican shacks up here, and 
at one of them we each paid the senorita 
five cents for a drink of water. All the 
water up here has to be carried by burro 
pack, so it is certainly worth something. 




THE WOODEN CROSS. 

The top of this mountain, some two 
thousand feet elevation, is about five hun- 
dred feet higher than the top of the pass. 
We decided, however, to go up there, too. 
It was a pretty steep, hard climb, but the 
view from there was fine, and it was 
something to be proud of that we had 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



71 



accomplished the feat. There is a large 
wooden cross which some ardent Catho- 
lic has placed upon the top of that part 
of the mountain which forms the left- 
hand wall of the pass. This wooden cross 
is about ten feet high and near the end 
of the cross arm and down on the main 
shaft are driven big iron spikes about an 
inch in diameter, suggesting the nails 
driven through the hands and feet of our 
Savior. 

Our company on the mountain was the 
last down for the night, and when we 
reached camp we were ravenously hun- 
gry and were served by the army cooks 
with a fine dinner and with some of the 
most delicious salad I have had since 
leaving home. 

We arrived at our building in Camp 
Cody about eight o'clock. It was an 
enjoyable trip in every way, and the ex- 
ercise, the relaxation and the fellowship 
of the day has put added vigor into our 
work for the soldiers. The pleasures of 
the day will be one of the bright mem- 
ories set in the heat and discomforts of 
this ofttime storm-swept desert. 

James E. Phillips. 



MOODY CHURCH MISSIONARY 
RALLY. 

The Third Annual Missionary Rally 
of the Moody Church, Chicago, was held 
in the commodious, although temporary, 
tabernacle at the corner of North Ave- 
nue and North Clark Street, from Wed- 
nesday, May 29th, to Sunday, June 2d. 
These rallies have been held each year 
since Rev. Paul Rader became pastor of 
the church, and each rally has been bet- 
ter than anything of the kind preceding. 

The number of undenominational for- 
eign Boards represented this year was 
fifteen, and the number of missionaries 
and representatives from these various 
Boards was thirty-three. There was esti- 
mated a total attendance of 15,000. The 
number of new volunteers are 202. The 
number of volunteers a year ago was 
177, and in 1916, 236; making a total of 
615 young people who, during the three 
years, have offered themselves for work 
in the foreign field. 

On the closing day of the Rally a spe- 
cial offering was taken for foreign mis- 
sions, amounting to over $30,000. Mr. 
Percy James is chairman of the Mis- 



sionary Committee, and under his ad- 
ministration during the past year the 
work of the church along this line has 
greatly advanced. A Volunteer class 
meets every Saturday evening, in whrich 
excellent service by way of preparation 
for the foreign field is carried on. 



THE CYNOSURE'S WORTH. 

A pastor of a Methodist Episcopal 
church writes : "I am absolutely opposed 
to the lodge and in sympathy with the 
aims and work of the N. C. A. Just 
here permit me to say that the March 
number of the Cynosure was worth the 
price of a year's subscription. Just at 
present lodgeism in our town is deeply 
incensed against the Methodist preacher. 
Many manifest the spirit of Jezebel after 
the slaughter of the prophets of Baal. 
But I have the sweet comfort of my gra- 
cious Master and I intend neither to 
give nor ask for quarter. Where my 
Lord leads I mean to follow with his 
help and blessing." 



The Ladies' Home Journal prints a 
good story apropos of secret society 
titles : The day after New Year's Rastus 
didn't show up for work until late. His 
boss asked why. "Well, you see, Boss," 
said Rastus, "I was taken into the lodge 
last night." "What reason is that that 
you should be late this morning?" "Well, 
you see, Boss, I was elected to a office 
and I'se busy this mornin'." "Elected to 
an office the night you were taken into 
the order?" "Yes, sir, I was appointed 
the Grand Exalted Ruler ob de Uni- 
verse." "That's a pretty high office for 
a new man, isn't it?" "No, sir; Grand 
Exalted Ruler ob de Universe is the 
berry lowest office what dey is in dis 
lodge." 



SOUND STRATEGY. 

"The hand of God is upon the world," 
says President Wilson. 

Now that the Day of Humiliation, 
Prayer and Fasting, called by our Presi- 
dent in response to the unanimous re- 
quest of both Houses of Congress, has 
,been observed by our nation (on May 
30), what then? 

God gives the answer: "Pray without 
ceasing" (1 Thess. 5:17). 

But we cannot pray in a way to reach 



72 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



God unless we pray according to God's 
clear directions for prayer. 

One of his unequivocal conditions of 
prevailing prayer is that it be offered in 
the 'name of the only begotten Son of 
God, Jesus Christ. 

To pray in the name of Jesus means 
a recognition of Jesus as Saviour, and 
that means a recognition of the sins 
from which we need to be saved ; and so 
we have the need of humiliation and 
confession of sin. 

If God directs this, it is "Sound 
Strategy'' to obey. 

Thus let our nation, and the Allied 
nations, continue steadfastly in an atti- 
tude of self -judgment and humiliation, 
confession of sin, and prayer in the 
name of Jesus, that this great war may 
come to an end and righteousness pre- 
vail against the enemy nation that pre- 
cipitated the war. 

In one community the women have 
been meeting on a week-day forenoon 
for special prayer. Have you started 
such a neighborhood prayer meeting for 
confession of individual and national sin 
and prayer for victory? 

The pamphlet, "When Will the War 
End?" that has been sent to some 40,000 
ministers through the generosity of a 
Christian layman, has a permanent mes- 
sage showing the need of confession and 
prayer ; it contains an editorial from The 
Sunday School, Times, "Winning This 
War" ; a sermon by Paul Rader of the 
Moody Church, "How Lincoln Led the 
Nation to Its Knees"; a discussion of 
the question by George T. B. Davis of 
the Pocket Testament League, "When 
Will the War End?"; and a series of 
statements by members of the United 
States Government giving the views of 
these national leaders. For widespread 
distribution throughout the nation at this 
time of crisis it may be had from The 
Sunday School Times Company at $3 a 
hundred copies, 40 cents a dozen copies, 
or 4 cents each, postpaid. — The Sunday 
School Times, June 1, 1918. 



"Christian possession means steward- 
ship. Admission to God's loving favor 
means commission to divide it with oth- 
ers. To be obliged to God for His good- 
ness means that we are obliged to be 
good to those about us." 



THE DRIFT OF THE TIMES. 

BY GEORGE C. REED. 

A large number of people who profess 
to be Christians, including many minis- 
ters, belong to secret, oath-bound lodges. 
That this is a danger to their own souls 
and a hindrance to the cause of Christ 
we have little doubt. 

Lodges Undermine Spirituality and True 
Morality. 

The regalia, ritual, ceremonies and 
conclaves of the secret orders savor of 
the flesh and not of the Spirit; of the 
world, not of Christ. The lodge claims 
the first place in the hearts of lodgemen, 
and there is abundant testimony that 
lodge-ridden towns are hard to reach in 
a revival — a real revival ; and that when 
a spiritually-minded man becomes en- 
tangled in the lodge his spiritual life soon 
becomes weak. 

The Lodge has nothing to impart to 
the Christian. Its benevolence is a spu- 
rious benevolence. Lodgemen swear to 
do good to fellow lodgemen, from whom 
they expect to receive good; they join 
the lodge to get help, not for opportuni- 
ties to give help. It is in this respect 
simply a mutual benefit association, 
whose benevolence consists in a willing- 
ness to do some good in order to receive 
more good. "If ye do good to them which 
do good to you, what thank have ye? 
for sinners also do even the same." Its 
morality is defective. The Mason, for 
instance, swears that he will do no harm 
to a brother Mason nor violate the chas- 
tity of his wife, sister or daughter; but, 
so far as the lodge is concerned, he may 
do both to non-Masons. 

The Lodge Is Anti-Christian. 

I. The lodge claims to be a religious 
institution. This is particularly true of 
the more influential orders. The stand- 
ard works of the Masons and Odd-Fel- 
lows assert it. "The Mystic Tie," by Al- 
bert G. Mackey, pages 30 and 32, says : 
"When we are asked 'What is Freema- 
sonry?' we answer in the first place that 
it is a science which engages us in the 
search after divine truth." "Freemason- 
ry is then also a religious institution ; the 
very science which it inculcates is in it- 
self the science of religion." "Free- 
masonry is emphatically a religious insti- 
tution. It teaches the existence of God. 
It points to the celestial canopy above, 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



73 



where is the Eternal Lodge, and where 
He presides. It instructs us in the way 
to reach the portals of that distant tem- 
ple." "The Odd-Fellows' Manual," by 
Rev. A. B. Grosh — endorsed by Grand 
Lodges — on pages 283, etc., contains 
these statements : "Odd- Fellowship was 
founded on great religious principles." 
"The descendants of Abraham, the vari- 
ous differing followers of jesus, the 
Pariahs of stricter sects, here gather 
around the same altar as one family, 
manifesting no difference of creed or 
worship." 

2. Lodges are rivals of the Gospel. 
They claim to save men. Town's "Spec- 
ulative Masonry," page 63, speaks thus : 
"Speculative Masonry, according to pres- 
ent acceptation, has an ultimate refer- 
ence to that spiritual building erected by 
virtue in the heart, and summarily im- 
plies the arrangement and perfection of 
those holy and sublime principles by 
which the soul is fitted for a meet tem- 
ple of God in a world of immortality." 
The "Lexicon of Freemasonry," by 
Mackey, page 297, says : "The Master 
Mason represents a man under the doc- 
trine of love, saved from the grave of 
iniquity and raised to the faith of salva- 
tion." Many other similar quotations 
might be made. 

The funeral ritual of many secret or- 
ders asserts or implies the salvation of 
their members. This is so well known 
that it is only necessary to call attention 
to.it. The deceased member is spoken 
of as being in heaven, having been trans- 
ferred to the Great Lodge above, etc., 
but always entirely on the ground of his 
being a lodgeman. It says nothing of re- 
pentance, and faith in the only Savior 
of men, and it ignores the openly wicked 
and vicious life the man may have lived. 

3. Lodges honor many kinds of false 
religions. Mohammedanism, Judaism, 
and many other faiths receive recogni- 
tion at their hands. Mackey's "Manual 
of the Lodge," page 53. sets this forth 
as follows : "To every Mason, whatever 
may be his particular creed, that revela- 
tion of the Deity which is recognized by 
his religion becomes his Trestle-board. 
Thus the Trestle-board of the Jewish 
Mason is the Old Testament; of the 
Christian, the Old and the New ; of the 
Mohammedan, the Koran." "The Free- 



mason's Monitor," by Daniel Sickles, 
pages 49, 50, adds : "And by the Trestle- 
board we are also reminded that, as the 
operative workman erects his temporal 
building agreeably to the rules and de- 
signs laid down by the Master on his 
Trestle-board, so should we, both oper- 
ative and speculative, endeavor to erect 
our spiritual building in accordance with 
the designs laid down by the Supreme 
Architect of the Universe, in the Great 
Book of Nature and Revelation, which 
is our spiritual, moral and Masonic 
Trestle-board." 

What any man believes to be the rev- 
elation of God, Masonry recognizes as 
his Trestle-board, the pattern for his 
spiritual building ! Is the Christian faith- 
ful to Christ when he is in fellowship 
with a system that claims to save men 
without Christ, and puts heathen re- 
ligions on a par with the religion of 
Christ? 

4. The Lodge excludes Christ. By 
formal decisions of Grand Lodges of Ma- 
sons and Odd-Fellows, the name of Jesus 
Christ has been excluded from the ritual 
of the lodge — that name offends Jew 
• and skeptic. The portions of the Bible 
chosen for reading do not contain the 
name of Christ, or else are deliberately 
mutilated by cutting out that Name 
which is above every name. The Mas- 
ter of the Lodge is the priest of the 
Lodge, though he, as well as other mem- 
bers, may be profane and wicked. The 
Christian Mason or Odd-Fellow gathers 
around an altar with men who hate his 
Savior, and as a brother joins in their 
Christless prayers. Christ said, "No man 
cometh unto the Father but by Me," and 
the Bible tells us that the worship of the 
Gentiles is offered unto demons and not 
unto God ; that the worship of impeni- 
tent, wicked men is an abomination to 
Him. It seems to us that it would be re- 
pugnant to the deepest feelings of the 
Christian's heart to join in a worship 
from which his Redeemer has been cast 
out. He is unfaithful to Christ when he 
does it. The lodge is a Pantheon, a 
heathen temple, for it has in it a place 
for every mans God. The god which a 
man makes for himself in his mind is as 
truly an idol as one he makes with his 
hands. 



74 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



Fellowship With Secret Orders Weakens 

the Christian's Testimony and 

Deadens His Convictions. 

Can a minister of the Gospel in his 
pulpit, a Sunday School teacher in his 
class, or any Christian in a revival as- 
sert with power to a lodgeman that he 
must be born again through faith in the 
Lord Jesus Christ, when in the lodge he 
joins with him in Christless worship and 
unites with him in publishing resolutions 
declaring the blessed state of some de- 
ceased brother who was an ungodly man ? 
How can the lodgeman tell what his 
friend really believes? As long as the 
lodgeman is alive his friend says that he 
is lost and must be born again, but when 
he is dead his Christian friend will de- 
clare that he is enjoying the blessedness 
of heaven ! 

Just how many preachers are mem- 
bers of these lodges we do not know. 
One Methodist minister suggests prob- 
ably more than half of those of his de- 
nomination, while another Methodist au- 
thor puts it at nine-tenths ; and other de- 
nominations have large numbers also. 
But what is the heart of preacher's 
duty? To declare to men that they can 
be saved through Christ, and only through 
Christ. He is unfaithful if he omits 
either declaration. How can he be faith- 
ful to that high and solemn responsibility 
if he joins with unsaved men in a lodge 
which they make a substitute for the 
Gospel and which claims that the Gos- 
pel is not necessary to salvation? Is he 
not responsible before God and men to 
warn them that this is not true? How 
can he thus warn them with any force 
in the Church, while tied up with them in 
the lodge room ? 

But participation in the lodge does 
more than weaken his testimony. It 
weakens his convictions. To stifle his 
conviction that a man can be saved only 
through Christ to such an extent that he 
will assist in a ceremony that declares a 
Christless man is saved deadens his own 
sense of Divine truth. It cannot be oth- 
erwise; for it is a spiritual law that faith- 
fulness to the truth brings more light, 
while unfaithfulness brings darkness. 
Oath-Bound Secret Societies Lead Chris- 
tians into Sin. 

i. In them they take the name of God 
in vain. "Thou shalt not take the name 
of the Lord thy God in vain, for the Lord 



will not hold him guiltless that taketh 
His name in vain." "Swear not at all." 
That these commands do not forbid ju- 
dicial oaths most persons admit, but the 
lodges have no moral or legal right te 
impose oaths. The penalties attached tG 
their oaths are hideous, repulsive to moral 
sense, and debasing. 

2. Lodge obligations tempt Christians 
to wrongfully favor their fellow lodge- 
men. A bank in a Nebraska town was 
on the verge of collapse, and, one of its 
officials, a Mason, quietly advised a fel- 
low Mason to withdraw his money which 
was on deposit. He did so, and later 
boasted to a relative of the advantage of 
being a Mason. He was favored illegally ; 
poor working girls and laboring men, un- 
warned, lost all they had. In such lodges 
the Christian puts himself under obli- 
gation to show such favors. That many 
men do so, who can doubt? If any do 
not, it is because there is more truth than 
Masonry in them. 

3. Some degrees of Masonry require a 
man to conceal a crime, help wrongdoers 
to escape, and persecute those who vio- 
late their lodge obligations. The Master 
Mason swears to keep a Master Mason's 
secrets as secure and inviolable in his 
breast as his own, murder and treason 
excepted ; he swears that whenever he 
sees the grand hailing sign of distress of 
a Master Mason he will fly to his relief. 
The Royal Arch Mason swears to keep 
all the secrets of a companion Royal 
Arch Mason when engaged in any diffi- 
culty, and espouse his cause so far as 
to extricate him from the same, if within 
his power, whether he be right or wrong. 

And the penalties are hideous. The 
Entered Apprentice's oath is first. Its 
penalty is, "To have my throat cut across, 
my tongue torn out by the roots, and my 
body buried in the rough sands of the sea 
at low-water mark, where the tide ebbs 
and flows twice in twenty-four hours. So 
help me God." The Master Mason's 
penalty for violating his oath is to have 
his body severed in the midst, his bowels 
burnt to ashes and scattered to the four 
winds of heaven. In the Royal Arch de- 
gree, it is to have his skull smitten off 
and his brains exposed to the scorching 
rays of the sun. 

Can any one doubt but that such oaths 
result in the perversion of justice, eva- 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



75 



sion of the law and escape of criminals? 
What shall the Christian do in such a 
case ? To conceal a crime is a crime ; to 
assist a criminal to escape is partaking of 
the crime. 

The Master Elect of Fifteen makes 
the candidate swear to take vengeance 
hy death upon all who are traitors to Ma- 
sonry. What is there that requires such 
guarding and justifies such vengeance? 
Without a forgiving spirit no man can 
hope for forgiveness, and a revengeful 
purpose is an absolute barrier to salva- 
tion. How, then, can a Christian take 
such an oath? 

It may be said that these oaths must 
not be taken too seriously ; that they 
really mean nothing, but are only part 
of an ancient ritual. But if they mean 
nothing they are unnecessary, and to take 
a meaningless and unnecessary oath is 
certainly taking the name of God in vain, 
which is a sin. To take any oaths in such 
a manner tends to rob all oaths of sacred- 
ness ; and to take oaths that are suitable 
only for pirates and bandits surely is 
beneath the dignity and inconsistent with 
the character of a child of God, even if 
they are only a ritual. If it is serious, it 
is wicked ; if it is only a form, God will 
not hold him guiltless. 

Have the Oaths and Ceremonies of the 
Lodges Been Publicly Revealed? 

In 1826 Mr. William Morgan of New 
York became convinced that it was 
wrong to remain a Mason or conceal the 
system, and he published an exposure of 
it. He was undoubtedly murdered by 
the Masons ; and this crime and conceal- 
ment of its perpetrators horrified the 
whole country. Thousands of Masons 
withdrew from the lodge, conventions 
were held, and declarations published af- 
firming that the revelations of Morgan 
v/ere correct. In 1828 Bernard published 
"Light on Masonry," giving the cere- 
monies, oaths and ritual in full. 

In 1829, in a trial in Orleans County, 
New York, the obligations of the First 
degrees and the Royal Arch degree were 
proved in the Circuit Court by the testi- 
mony of three seceding and one adhering 
Mason ; and in obedience to a resolution 
of the State Senate Judge Gardner re- 
ported the evidence, and it was printed. 
In 1830 the same obligations were proved 
in open court in Rhode Island, and again 
in 1 83 1. In 1830 Allyn published a 



"Ritual of Freemasonry," disclosing thir- 
ty-one degrees. In 1834 the Legislature 
of Connecticut appointed a committee to 
investigate a petition of fourteen hundred 
citizens praying that such oaths be pro- 
hibited ; and the committee approved of 
the petition. 

Charles G. Finney was the 1 'resident 
of Oberlin College, a most godly man, 
and a powerful preacher. His character 
for integrity and piety forbids any ques- 
tion as to his truthfulness, and his intel- 
lectual powers were of the highest order. 
When a young man, and a Mason of the 
Third Degree, he had been converted in 
a striking manner, and he soon felt that 
the lodge was inconsistent with godliness, 
so he quietly withdrew. After the ex- 
posures which followed the death of 
Morgan he himself published a denun- 
ciation of Masonry, in which he declares 
that the disclosures of the first three de- 
grees, of which he had knowledge, were 
correct. He gives his reasons for con- 
sidering his oaths null and void, and this 
book can still be secured by those who 
wish to investigate the matter further. 

Thus we see that there is abundant in- 
formation to be found as to the true 
character of the Masonic lodges. 

It is true that many of the more re- 
cently organized secret societies make no 
such religious pretensions as Masonry 
and Odd-Fellowship, nor do they have 
such horrible oaths. They are chiefly so- 
cial and insurance orders. But we be- 
lieve that their secrecy renders them un- 
suitable for Christians, and that even 
such lodges are harmful spiritually, tend- 
ing to divert the interest, money and time 
from spiritual things. 

Every Christian is a redeemed person, 
redeemed by the life blood of the Son of 
God from the penalty of sin, and the do- 
minion of the devil, to be made a child 
of God. Redemption puts him in a new 
relationship to God, and it ought to de- 
cide all his relations to men as well. 
Hearken to the words of the Lord : 

"Be ye not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers ; for what fellowship 
hath righteousness with unrighteousness ? 
and what communion hath light with 
darkness? and what concord hath Christ 
with Belial? and what part hath he that 
believeth with an infidel ? and what agree- 
ment hath the temple of God with idols? 



76 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



for ye are the temple of the living God ; 
as God hath said: I will dwell in them, 
and walk in them, and I will be their 
God, and they shall be My people. 
Wherefore come out from among them, 
and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and 
touch not the unclean thing; and I will 
receive you, and will be a Father unto 
you, and ye shall be My sons and daugh- 
ters, saith the Lord Almighty" (2 Cor. 
6:4-18). 

Believing that the fellowship of the 
Lodge is dangerous to the Christian, and 
hearing the voice of God speaking in His 
Work against the unequal yoke, we de- 
sire sincerely and earnestly to Sound the 
Alarm. 

Gospel Union Publishing Company. 



The above article, "Drift of the 
Times," is issued in a twelve-page tract, 
envelope size, by the Gospel Missionary 
Union, Euclid and 7th St., Qansas City, 
Missouri, who also publish "The Gospel 
Messenger/' monthly, fifty cents per 
year. 

LOANS TO FARMERS. 

During April $13,988,619 was paid out 
to farmers of the United States by the 
Federal land banks on long-time, first- 
mortgage loans. 

On May 1 the total amount of money 
paid out to farmers since the establish- 
ment of the Federal land banks was 
$91,951,886, covering 40,451 loans closed. 
The total amount of loans applied for up 
to May 1 was $229,948,835, representing 
126,630 applicants. There are in process 
of closing loans to the amount of $174,- 
858,616, which are awaiting abstracts of 
title, release of mortgages or other 
formalities. 

The grand total of loans closed is 
divided by the Federal land bank districts 
as follows : 

Springfield $2,876,045 

Baltimore. 3,407,750 

Columbia 3> I 9 2 ,775 

Louisville 5,407,600 

New Orleans 6,091,315 

St. Louis 5,128,935 

St. Paul 15,424,900 

Omaha . . . . 1 1,438,390 

Wichita 11,191,700 

Houston 7>75S>79 1 

Berkeley 5,806,900 

Spokane 14,229,785 



FRATS START GIRLS SMOKING. 

Miss Olivia Pound, adviser of girls at 
the Lincoln High School, in an address 
before Nebraska teachers at the state 
convention here, Thursday, said that 
high school fraternities and secret organ- 
izations lead the girls to cigarette 
smoking and many other evils. 

Miss Pound scored secret societies of 
any kind among high school girls. 

"They do not lead toward health train- 
ing or home training," said Miss Pound. 
"The atmosphere of these organizations 
is decidedly immoral. 

"They are an abomination. They are 
undemocratic and set up false standards 
of life. They knock other activities and 
seldom throw themselves whole-heartedly 
into school projects." — Omaha Daily 
News, Nov. 9, 1917. 

Why cannot public school teachers 
place themselves beside such public and 
patriotic men as Wendell Phillips, who 
declared, "A secret society is wholly out 
of place under democratic institutions. 
* * * Every good citizen should make 
war on all secret societies and give him- 
self no rest until they are forbidden by 
law and rooted out of existence," in- 
stead of the usual puerile declaration, 
"High school fraternities cheapen the 
college fraternities, and it is a question 
if they will not be the means of elim- 
inating the later from colleges and uni- 
versities," as though that would be a 
calamity to be dreaded. 



"ROUGH STUFF." 

Horrors of the Elks' initiation of thirty 
years ago will be exemplified in the cere- 
mony at the lodge room Friday night, 
Feb. 18, 1918, commemorating the thirty- 
second anniversary of Omaha (Neb.) 
Lodge No. 39, which was instituted Feb. 
7, 1886. 

In early days the Elks' initiation tried 
the nerves of the candidates. On the 
occasion of the institution of Omaha 
Lodge, one of the visiting Elks was at- 
tacked by an epileptic fit. During the 
attending excitement the colored porter 
of the building ran down the street cry- 
ing that the Elks had killed a man.— 
Evening World-Herald, Feb. 7, 191 8. 

Let "Deserved" be written on the door 
of hell, but on the door of heaven and 
life, "The free gift."— Baxter. 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



77 




"With this machine the candidate can 
not kick his own pants while wearing 
them, but can have them spanked where 
his mother used to apply the sole of her 
slipper, by simply testing his strength. 
The position in which he places himself 
causes a little strain in the seat of his 
pants, which is not objectionable, as it 
pulls up all the slack when he pulls up 
on the handles. Just about the time he 
gets well started lifting, a trigger is auto- 
matically released, which causes the 
spanking paddle to spring into place and 
strike him on the kazabo, at the same 
time exploding a 32-calibre blank car- 
tridge with a loud' report. That is not 
all; there is also an electric motor con- 
cealed under the platform of the ma- 
chine, which is operated by clock work 
that turns on a good current of elec- 
tricity at the same time the paddle hits 
his pants. The sensation can better be 
imagined than explained." 

(Candidate is hoodwinked and pre- 
sented at officer's station.) 

Officer (to candidate) : "My friend, 
before advancing further into the secret 
work of this order, it will be necessary 
for you to prove to the lodge that you 
are an able-bodied man, as none but the 



strong and healthy can become members 
of the order. We have an automatic 
lifting machine which registers your 
weight and also the number of pounds 
you can lift. Your weight and strength 
are to be recorded on our lodge records 
for future reference, and in order that 
you may not have the opportunity of 
'faking' you will have to be hoodwinked 
while you make this test. We have a 
record of each of our members, but none 
of them know just what it is, because if 
they should ever be called upon for an- 
other record, they would not have a 
chance to misrepresent things. You will 
now be conducted to the lifting machine 
and the Conductor will instruct you how 
to proceed." 

(Conductor placed candidate on lifting 
machine and instructs him to stoop and 
take hold of the handles and lift all the 
possibly can. The machine will do the 
rest.) 



SPANKER EXPLODES WITH DIRE 
RESULT DURING INITIATION. 

Special Dispatch to the World -He raid. 

Sioux Falls, S. D., Nov. 16, 1917. — 
Peter Peterson of Butler lies in a hos- 
pital at the point of death as the result 
of the playing of a practical joke while 



78 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



he was being initiated into a secret order, 
A contrivance known as a spanker was 
used, and to make it "pop," the case of 
a shotgun shell was utilized in one side 
of the spanker. 

Peterson was being initiated and the 
explosion was so terrific when the spank- 
er was ''popped" that the greater portion 
of the flesh was torn from the hip and 
the bone also was injured. 

The shock to Peterson's nervous sys- 
tem also was great. The victim was 
rushed to a hospital, where everything 
possible is being done to save his life. 
Even if he lives it is feared he will be a 
cripple for life. Members of the Wood- 
men order are greatly distressed over 
the accident and believe it will result in 
all rough work being cut out of the 
initiation of candidates into secret or- 
ders. 



DECISION FOR THE TRUTH. 

Some things are true and some things 
are false. I regard that as an axiom; 
but there are many persons who evi- 
dently do not believe it. 

The current principle of the present 
age seems to be, "Some things are either 
true or false, according to the point of 
view from which you look at them. 
Black is white, and white is black, ac- 
cording to circumstances; and it does 
not particularly matter which you call 
it. Truth of course is true, but it would 
be rude to say that the opposite is a 
lie; we must not be bigoted, but remem- 
ber the motto, 'So many men, so many 
minds.' " 

Our forefathers were particular about 
maintaining landmarks ; they had strong 
notions about fixed points of revealed, 
doctrine, and were very tenacious of 
what they believed to be Scriptural ; their 
fields were protected by hedges and 
ditches, but their sons have grubbed up 
the hedges, filled up the ditches, laid all 
level and played at leap-frog with the 
boundary stones. The school of modern 
thought laughs at the ridiculous posi- 
tiveness of Reformers and Puritans, it 
is advancing in glorious liberality, and 
before long will publish a grand alliance 
between heaven and hell, or, rather, an 
amalgamation of the two establishments 
upon terms of mutual concession, allow- 



ing falsehood and truth to lie side by 
side, like the lion with the lamb. Still, 
for all that, my firm old-fashioned be- 
lief is that some doctrines are true, and 
that statements which are diametrically 
opposite to them are not true. 

We Have Received Positive Orders. 

We have a fixed faith to preach, my 
brethren, and we are sent forth with a 
definite message from God. We are not 
left to fabricate the message as we go 
along. 

We are not sent forth by our Master 
with a general commission arranged on 
this fasion : 

"As you shall think in your heart and 
invent in your head, so preach. Keep 
abreast of the times. Whatever the peo- 
ple want to hear, tell them that, and 
they shall be saved." Verily, we read 
not so. There is something definite in 
the Bible. It is not quite a lump of wax 
to be shaped at our will, or a roll of 
cloth to be cut according to the prevail- 
ing fashion. 

Believing, therefore, that there is such 
a thing as truth, and such a thing as 
falsehood, that there are truths in the 
Bible, and that the Gospel consists in 
something definite which is to be be- 
lieved by men, it becomes us to be de- 
cided as to what we teach, and to teach 
in a decided manner. We have to deal 
with men who will be either lost or 
saved, and they certainly will not be 
saved by erroneous doctrine. We have 
to deal with God, whose servants we 
are, and He will not be honored by our 
delivering falsehoods ; neither will He 
give us a reward, and say, "Well done, 
good and faithful servant, thou hast 
mangled the Gospel as judiciously as any 
man that ever lived before thee." 

We stand in a verj solemn position, 
and ours should be the spirit of old 
Micaiah, who said: 

"As the Lord my God liveth, before 
whom I stand, whatsoever the Lord saith 
unto me that will I speak." 

In What Ought We to Be Positive? 

Well, there are gentlemen alive who 
imagine that there are no fixed princi- 
ples to go upon. "Perhaps a few doc- 
trines," said one to me, "Perhaps a few 
doctrines may be considered as estab- 
lished. It is, perhaps, ascertained that 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



79 



there is a God; but oile ought not to 
dogmatize upon His personality ; a great 
deal may be said for pantheism." 

Such men creep into the ministry, but 
they are generally cunning enough to con- 
ceal the breadth of their minds beneath 
Christian phraseology. 

The Lord of Grace. 

As for us — as for me, at any rate — T 
am certain that there is a God, and 1 
mean to preach it as a man does who is 
absolutely sure. He is the Maker of 
heaven and earth, the Master of provi- 
dence, and the Lord of grace : let His 
name be blessed forever and ever! We 
will have no questions and debates as to 
Him. 

His Words. 

We are equally certain that the book 
which is called "The Bible" is His Word, 
and is inspired : not inspired in the sense 
in which Shakespeare, and Milton and 
Dryden may be inspired, but in an in- 
finitely higher sense. We believe that 
everything stated in the Book that comes 
to us from God is to be accepted by us 
as His sure testimony, and nothing less 
than that. God forbid we should be en- 
snared by those various interpretations 
of the modus of inspiration, which 
amount to little more than frittering it 
away. The Book is a divine production ; 
it is perfect, and is the last court of ap- 
peal. I would as soon dream of blasp- 
heming my Maker as of questioning the 
infallibility of His Word. 

Trinity in Unity. 

We are also sure concerning the doc- 
trine of the blessed Trinity. We cannot 
explain how the Father, Son and Spirit 
can be each one distinct and perfect in 
Himself, and yet that these three are 
one, so that there is but one God ; yet we 
do verily believe it, and mean to preach 
it, notwithstanding Unitarian, Socinian, 
Sabellian or any other error. We shall 
hold fast evermore the doctrine of the 
Trinity in Unity. 

The Vicarious Sacrifice. 

And, brethren, there will be no un- 
certain sound from us as, + o the atone- 
ment of our Lord Jesus Christ. We 
cannot leave the Blood out of our min- 
istry, or the life of it will be gone; for 
we may say of the Gospel "The Blood is 
the life thereof." The proper substitu- 
tion of Christ, the vicarious sacrifice of 



Christ, on the behalf of His people, that 
they may live through Him — this we 
must publish till we die. 

The Great and Glorious Spirit of God. 

Neither can we waver in our mind for 
a moment concerning the great and glor- 
ious Spirit of God — the fact of His ex- 
istence, His personality, the power of 
His working, the necessity of His influ- 
ences, the certainty that no man is re- 
generated except by Him ; that we are 
born again by the Spirit of God, and 
that the Spirit dwells in believers, and 
is the author of all good in them, their 
sanctifier and preserver, without whom 
they can do no good thing whatsoever — 
we shall not at all hesitate as to preach- 
ing these truths. 

Born Sinners Must Be Born Saints. 

The absolute necessity of the new 
birth is also a certainty. We come down 
with demonstration when we touch that 
point. We shall never poison our peo- 
ple with the notion that a moral refor- 
mation will suffice, but we will over and 
over again say to them, "Ye must be 
born again." No, we dare not flatter 
our hearers, but we must continue to tell 
them that they are born sinners and must 
be born saints, or they will never see the 
face of God with acceptance. 

The Tremendous Evil of Sin. 

The tremendous evil of sin — we shall 
not hesitate about that. We shall speak 
on that matter both sorrowfully and pos- 
itively ; and, though some very wise men 
raise difficult questions about hell, we 
shall not fail to declare the terrors of the 
Lord, and the fact that the Lord has 
said, "These shall go away into ever- 
lasting punishment, but the righteous 
into life eternal." 

Grace! Grace! Grace! 

Neither will we ever give an uncertain 
sound as to the glorious truth that sal- 
vation is all of grace. If ever we our- 
selves are saved, we know that sovereign 
grace alone has done it, and we feel that 
it must be the same with others. We 
will publish, "Grace! Grace! Grace!" 
with all our might, living and dying. 

We shall be very decided, also, as to 
justification by faith; for salvation is 
"Not of works, lest any man should 
boast." "Life in a look at the Crucified 
One" will be our message. Trust in the 
Redeemer will be that saving grace which 



80 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



we pray the Lord to implant in all our 
hearers' hearts. 

Decided Declarations Without Stammer- 
ing. 

Points which are essential and funda- 
mental will be declared by us without 
any stammering, without any inquiring 
of the people, "What would you wish us 
to say?" .Yes, and without the apology, 
'Those are my views, but other people's 
views may be correct." We ought to 
preach the Gospel, not as our views at all, 
but as the mind of Go d— the testimony 
of Jehovah concerning His own Son, and 
in reference to salvation for lost men,, 
If we had been entrusted with the mak- 
ing of the Gospel, we might have altered 
it to suit the taste of this modest century, 
but never having been employed to orig- 
inate the good news, but merely to re- 
peat it, we dare not stir beyond the rec- 
ord. What we have been taught of God 
we teach. If we do not do this, we are 
not fit for our position. He that hath 
God's Word, let him speak it faithfully, 
and he will have no need to answer gain- 
sayers, except with a "Thus saith the 
Lord." This, then, is the matter con- 
cerning which we are decided. 
■ — An address delivered to the students of 
The Pastors' College, London, England. 
Charles H. Spurgeon. 



THE EASTERN STAR. 

In 1913 the Association held conferences 
at Seattle, Portland and at other places on 
the Pacific coast. It was at the close of the 
evening address by President Blanchard in 
Portland that a lady and her husband came 
forward and introduced themselves. Presi- 
dent Blanchard had related in his address the 
testimony given in Chicago, on January 21, 
1898, by Miss Ella M. Drake and the lady 
came forward to say that she was the Miss 
Drake mentioned, and at the same time in- 
troduced her husband and confirming the 
testimony which had been given, The call 
for her testimony leads us to reprint it in 
this number of the Cynosure. — Editor. 
My Experience in Secret Societies. 

"In 1893 I went to Elgin, Illinois, and 
I had a hungry longing for Christian 
companionship in a strange place. Hear- 
ing of the Eastern Star Order a little 
bit, and connecting with the name the 
Star of Bethlehem, or the light of Jesus, 



I supposed it w*ould bring me in closer 
communion with His people; so I was 
initiated into the Order about Septem- 
ber of 1893. 

"After going through the initiation, 
that comprised a certain obligation that 
bound us to protect one another's char- 
acter and in love to do all we could to 
promote truth and love to one another, 
there is an intermission, and they all 
gather round you, and shake hands with 
you, and welcome you into the Order. 

"One very nice, refined looking old 
lady, with gray hair (old enough to have 
been my mother) came and sat down by 
me, and after the usual preliminaries of 
asking questions, she began to tell me 
about the Worthy Matron, whom she 
said kept company with people of ill- 
repute ; and she herself was said to have 
questionable company at the house when 
her husband was away (who was a rail- 
road man). £ ' 

"I had promised God that if anybody 
came to me with gossip of this sort that 
I would try and bring the two together, 
and stop the nonsense. This I did, mak- 
ing a very fine row ; and one thing led 
to another until they had a trial in the 
Chapter Room, which resulted in the 
breaking up of the Order, inasmuch as 
out of 120 members ninety or more 
started a new Chapter under the name 
of Bethel Chapter. 

"The loving 'Brothers' sometimes 
came up to the ladies, while standing 
talking and slipped their arms around 
your waist, and several tried the same 
on me and when my anger arose, they 
would laughingly say : 'We are brothers 
and sisters, don't get angry, Miss Drake.' 
But I did get angry as I always remem- 
ber a motto given me when a very young 
girl : 'First the waist, then the lips, then 
the girl's gone/ 

"In over a year's time I came back 
to the city (Chicago) from Elgin Chap- 
ter No. 212. Before placing my demit 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



HI 



in the city I visited Queen Esther Chap- 
ter, one of the largest chapters ; Butler 
Chapter ; Golden Rod Chapter and other 
chapters. The Golden Rod Chapter 
seemed to have the purest Christian at- 
mosphere. So I placed my demit with 
them, and after being in there some time, 
I found that they were no better than 
any of the others, and that the jealous 
feelings existed against those that held 
the highest offices, the same as Elgin 
Chapter No. 212, because they wished 
to gain the offices for themselves. The 
unlawful and unholy relations between 
some of the men and women, who had 
the reputation of, and the appearance of 
being the best educated and most re- 
fined in the Chapter, was the cause of 
the charter being taken from them by 
the Grand Chapter. 

"I asked for my demit from Golden 
Rod Chapter before going to New York 
in 1895, and the secretary promised 
faithfully to send it to me, but I failed 
to receive it, if she sent it, and there- 
fore cannot give my demit. To be sure 
the beautiful banquets, etc., are in cer- 
tain ways very pleasant, as well as ex- 
pensive, but altogether they are better 
let alone. 

"This is a mere outline of the experi- 
ence which cost me quite a good deal 
of money, time and unhappiness ; and if 
these few words will prevent others from 
making the same mistake and glorify our 
Lord and Master, Jesus Christ, I shall 
be very thankful. 

"Not being able to bear witness Fri- 
day afternoon, I write this. 

"May God keep and bless you. 
"Your sister in Christ, 

"Miss Ella N. Drake." 

January 20th, 1898. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



No man will build himself a hut until 
he has got wet ; no man will stoop until 
he has bumped his head. — Selected. 



BOOK REVIEW. 

"That the human race is in a supreme 
crisis is obvious to the dullest intelli- 
gence. Nothing like it has ever marked 
the long life of humanity on the earth 
It is impossible to restrain the effort to 
find the meaning of it all. No one is 
really satisfied with or convinced by the 
easy solutions proposed by a shallow op- 
timism. For thirty years their prophets 
of peace without righteousness have as- 
sured us that great and serious wars 
were ended forever, and yet we are in 
the greatest and most serious of all 
wars." 

The Spirit-taught Christian believes 
that somehow, somewhere, the answer is 
in the writings of the prophets — writings 
authenticated by Jesus Christ, and by 
hundreds of literal fulfillments. 

"What Do the Prophets Say ?" 

Doctor Scofield proceeds in his pecu- 
liarly lucid and concise way to tell us, 
by rightly dividing the word of truth and 
comparing Scripture with Scripture, just 
what the prophets say. 

To the student of the Word, to the 
busy men and women who are pressed 
on every hand and always wondering 
what it can all mean and what the end 
will be, this new book of Rev. Dr. Sco- 
field is of peculiar value in these trying 
days. 

From the first chapter entitled "Does 
the Bible Throw Light on This War?" 
through to the last — "Earth's Golden 
Age" — the writer takes one on through 
the Word beginning with the prophets' 
mission, Daniel's vision of the world- 
powers, past and present fulfillments in 
the history made and in the making as 
we see it today, and proving so plainly 
that God is only working out his pur- 
pose and bringing to pass that which He 
has so truly foretold through the words 
of his prophets. 

It is a wonderful grouping together of 
portions of the Word of God to prove 
every point. These Bible texts are given 
as footnotes on each page. Added to 
this is a Scripture Index in the end of 
the book, enabling one to locate every 
Scripture passage here discussed, and a 
Topical Index giving many details of 
prophecy. This makes it not merely an 
intensely interesting book for regular 
reading, but helpful to a degree as a 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



textbook to the clearer understanding of 
the law and the prophets, the age in 
which we live and the age which is to 
come when "He shall reign from sea to 
sea/' 



WHAT DO THE PROPHETS SAY? 

BY ER. C. I. SCOFIELD, 

Editor of Scoiield Reference Bible. 
Price, handsomely bound in cloth, 75 cents, 
postpaid. Address : The Sunday School Times 
Company, 1031 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 



"WOODMEN CIRCLE" LAWSUIT. 



Lawyers Split $40,000 of Circle Money. 

Forty thousand dollars in attorney fees 
as the result of the recent friction in the 
Woodmen Circle will have to be paid out 
of the treasury of that organization, ac- 
cording to a ruling by the Supreme Court 
of Nebraska. 

This friction was the result of an ef- 
fort of some insurgents to oust Mrs. 
Manchester, supreme guardian, who 
wins, according to the legal status, but is 
some loser in the political status of the 
case. — The Bee, Omaha, Sept. 22, 1917. 



SCHOOL SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Two issues are involved in the dis- 
cussion of high school secret societies. 
First, whether the societies justify their 
existence and should receive the sanc- 
tion of school officials; second, whether, 
if their abolition is desirable, it is prac- 
ticable. 

If a referendum were taken on the 
first question there is little doubt how 
the parents, or the entire student body 
itself, would vote. Every pupil should 
be entitled to all privileges, including 
participation in athletics, societies, and 
all school interests. If the secret so- 
cieties have all the benefits claimed for 
them, the argument against them is the 
stronger so long as a single pupil is 
excluded from them, and admission to 
them rests not upon ability or competi- 
tion, but upon the capricious immature 
judgment of pupils. 

How to Put Them Out. 

Some school officials sincerely ques- 
tion whether the societies can be elimi- 
nated. Here are a few suggestions 
about how it could be done: 

Forbid recognition of the societies in 



school life, by the wearing of pins or 
other insignia. 

Forbid participation in other school 
interests, including athletics, by mem- 
bers of secret societies. 

Forbid pupils to join secret societies 
upon pain of expulsion from school. — 
Washington, D. C. Times, Nov. 29, 1916. 



The United States has lately lost a 
small town — Harding, Minn. — through a 
rectification of the boundary line along 
some 40 miles between Minnesota and 
Ontario, west of Lake Superior. With 
this town go the Echo, Crane and Sand 
Pit lakes, all small, and a trifle of wood- 
land, from the largest county of Minne- 
sota — St. Louis. The cession amounts 
to but a few townships in all, in a coun- 
try as yet sparsely settled. The ceded 
section, which is wedge-shaped, throws 
a good deal more of the Vermillion Rivei 
into Canada than before, and at its 
southernmost point comes within 20 
miles of the Mesaba Iron Range. 



THE BEST INVESTMENT IN THE 
WORLD. 

From whatever angle it may be con- 
sidered, an investment by an American 
citizen in Liberty Bonds or War Savings 
Stamps is the best investment in the 
world. 

The money so invested goes to the 
Government, which loans some of it to 
our allies ; all of it is used in one way or 
another to maintain, support, arm, equip 
and make victorious, our armies and ®ur 
allies in Europe. Surely no American 
money could be put to a better purpose. 
Here is an investment in the power and 
success of our country, an investment in 
the efficiency, strength, safety and suc- 
cess of our fighting men on sea and land. 



Though there were many rooms in the 
ark, there was only one door — "And the 
door of the ark thou shalt set in the side 
thereof." And so there is only one Door 
in the ark of our Salvation; and that is 
Christ. — Selected. 



The greatest and most lasting fruits 
have accompanied that Christianity 
which has promoted the fullest and 
freest development of all intellectual 
powers. 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



83 



THE FIRST GENERAL CONFERENCE 
In Behalf of the Evangelization of Russia 
to be held from June 24th to June 28th 
in the City of Chicago, at the Moody 
Tabernacle, corner North Avenue and N. 
Clark Street. 

A choir of about fifty students from 
the Russian Bible Institute of Philadel- 
phia are expected to be present to sing 
their beautiful Russian hymns during 
Conference week. Russian speaking 
and other Slavonic Evangelists and Mis- 
sionary Workers of the Chicago Tract 
Society will also give their aid. 

Ministers and friends who find it im- 
possible to attend, but who are moved 
to have some part in this work, are urged 
to arrange special prayer services dur- 
ing the Conference week, and all Evan- 
gelical Ministers are requested to preach 
special Missionary Sermons on "Russian 
Mission Sunday," June 23rd. Material 
of interest in connection with the Evan- 
gelization of Russia, will be sent to Min- 
isters, Sunday School Superintendents 
and Bible Class Leaders upon applica- 
tion. 

Any friends unable to attend, but 
whose hearts are stirred to take some 
financial part in this work, can send 
their gifts to Mr. A. M. Johnson, (Pres- 
ident of the National Life Insurance Co. 
of the U. S. A.) the Treasurer of the 
Conference, 29 S. LaSalle street, Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

All inquiries and communications re- 
garding the Conference should be ad- 
dressed to Rev. Jesse W. Brooks, (Su- 
perintendent of the Chicago Tract So- 
ciety) Chairman Conference Executive 
Committee, 440 S. Dearborn street, Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

The Revolution in Russia has resulted 
in throwing open to the Gospel the larg- 
est country, with its largest poulation of 
white people in the world. There are 
182,000,000 people in Russia, and yet 
there are not as many Evangelical work- 
ers there as in the City of Chicago alone. 
Many are eagerly waiting for the Gospel. 
When recently one of the leaders of the 
"Dom Evangelia" Mission in Petrograd, 
immediately after returning from Si- 
'beria, went with his choir and workers 
to the large square directly in front of 
the Winter Palace, and conducted for 



the first time in the existence of that 
city an open air Gospel service, large 
numbers of men and women assembled. 
After the message was delivered the peo- 
ple turned to the preacher and said : 
"Where have you been so long? and why 
did you not tell us this before!" "I was 
in Siberia," was the reply. 

Never since the beginning of Chris- 
tianity has such an immense population 
of our own white people become acces- 
sible to missionary enterprise. Our 
evangelization plan must embrace not 
only the hundred million native Rus- 
sians, but also the seven million Jews, 
the twenty million Poles, the thirty mil- 
lion Ukrainias, millions of Mohamme- 
dans (Tartars, Kurds, Kirghiz, etc.), 
Armenians, Roumanians and Greeks, and 
besides these the Bulgarians, Servians, 
Croatians, Montenegrins and other re- 
lated Slavonic peoples. 

The propaganda of Atheism and Ma- 
terialism is already assuming awful pro- 
portions. There is no time to lose. The 
Greek Orthodox church is rapidly losing 
its grip upon the hearts of the people, 
and before long large masses of simple 
religiously inclined Russians may be led 
astray into complete infidelity. Millions 
of the people are looking for something 
different. What is it to be? Atheism 
or the gospel? If the latter, then, be- 
cause of existing conditions in Europe, 
AMERICA MUST ASSUME QHIEF 
RESPONSIBILITY for meeting the 
need, else this greatest missionary op- 
portunity of the centuries may be turned 
into the most abysmal failure. 



I thought that my fret fulness, and 
other marks of an unsubdued spirit, 
arose from a sense of my corruption, 
and a secret dependence on my own 
powers for a cure. Were I to bring the 
maladies of my soul to the great Physi- 
cian, in simple reliance on His grace, I 
should, with many other benefits, receive 
a cure of that bane of my peace, disap- 
pointed arrogance, which proudly seeks 
for good where it can never be found. In 
every disease of the soul, let me charge 
myself with the blame, and Christ with 
the cure of it, so shall I be humbled and 
Christ glorified. — Henry Martyn. 



84 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



TRAVESTY OF A SACRED CLASSIC. 

An extreme instance of levity and bad 
taste disfigured one of the pages of the 
Odd-Fellow Review in March. Occupy- 
ing exactly one column, it cannot be ex- 
cused as a trifling space filler that some 
one slipped in when making up the 
forms. It can evade no reasonable test. 
The case is the more surprising because 
the order, while not crediting the author- 
ship of the parable of the good Samar- 
itan, nevertheless, invariably dramatizes 
it after a fashion in one of its degree 
initiations. On a large banner carried in 
a procession, the picture of the beast 
with his rider, who has dismounted to 
aid a man in distress, likely enough goes 
far to make it seem true to the thought- 
less or uninitiated that Odd-Fellowship 
must indeed be "founded on the Bible. " 
In view of the use the order tries to 
make of the parable, the publication of 
such an article by one of its leading or- 
gans is no less than surprising. 

The shock felt is more, however, than 
surprise. It is not due to wonder at mere 
folly. It is that pain and horror which 
profanity and sacrilege, under whatever 
circumstances they rear their serpent 
heads, unfailingly inspire in men of taste 
and sense and real piety. Mockery of 
our Lord and his solemn teachings out- 
rages the finest feelings and sentiments 
that the noblest natures can entertain. 
Besides this, the parable of the good 
Samaritan is a literary classic, and a 
travesty of any piece of writing that all 
regard as of the first order, intensifies a 
shock due primarily to profanity or 
sacrilege or impiety, while it excites irre- 
sistible feelings of contempt and disgust. 
Such feelings are liable to be attended by 
involuntary estimates, not solely of the 
contributor of an article and of the editor 
who publishes it, but besides this of the 
membership which the editor of their so- 
ciety organ estimates as likely to be 
pleased, and not repelled and mortified, 
on finding matter of this grade in its 
columns. 



And though "Nor sun, nor stars appear, 
And no small tempest," too, is near, 

And waves and seas are foaming; 
We spy a beacon from afar, 
The bright and glorious Morning Star ! 

And hail Himself as coming! 

— M. Taylor. 



THE KNIGHTS OF MALTA. 

There are a number of organizations 
(eighteen, according to the Cyclopedia 
of Fraternities), which have the word 
"Malta" in their official title. Perhaps 
the most widely known among them is 
the "Ancient and Illustrious Order of 
the Knights of Malta," which, in its 
"Declaration of Principles," claims to be 
"the most Ancient Knightly Order in ex- 
istence," "the legitimate descendants of 
the illustrious, religious and military or- 
der of the Middle Ages, heir to its great- 
ness, and fully endowed with its ancient 
rites and ceremonies." (Credat Judaeus 
Appollo!) 

Of greater interest is the statement, 
in the same "Declaration of Principles," 
that the Knights of Malta is "a religious 
order," which "welcomes all Protestants, 
by whatever name known, who love our 
Lord Jesus Christ, to enlist under its 
banner." 

Does this mean that Catholics are ex- 
cluded from membership? It does. In 
a letter written by Mr. Wm. F. Haas, 
"organizer" of the Order, to an applicant 
at Granite City, 111., under date of 
August 13, 1914, that gentleman says: 

"The Ancient and Illustrious Order of 
Knights of Malta is the best Order in 
America today. It is the cleanest of all. 
All its members must be strictly Protes- 
tant, and this means the whole house. 
No Roman Catholic can be a member, 
or any one that is married to a Roman 
Catholic ; neither can a member marry 
a Roman Catholic or send his children 
to the R. C. schools." 

In such circumstances it is a distinct 
credit to St. Louis that, in the words of 
Mr. Haas, "it took three long years to 
organize a Commandery in that city." 

This anti-Catholic animus is partly 
explained by the fact (vouched for by 
the Cyclopedia of Fraternities, 2nd ed., 
New York, 1907, p. 220) that "the An- 
cient and Illustrious order confers twelve 
degress, some of them of Orange origin." 

The religious character of the Order 
is apparent from the statements which 
we found in the July, 1914, issue of the 
"Official Circular" published quarterly 
by the Supreme Grand Commandery, N. ' 
E. cor. Broad and Arch Strs., Philadel- 
phia. The same circular contains the 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



85 



admission (page 3) that the Order has 
"numerous secret mysteries" and a "Su- 
preme Prelate." 

— The Fortnightly Review. 



CONFISCATION. 

Irvin S. Cobb closes a short article in 
The Watchman-Examiner of New York 
as follows: "I maintain that neither 
publishers nor writers will object to leg- 
islation which will put upon the period- 
ical publishers, and incidentally the writ- 
ers, an equitable share, of the burden of 
taxation necessary to carry the war to a 
successful conclusion. What we do ob- 
ject to is confiscation." Earlier in the 
same article he had justified using the 
term by affirming that "If the increase 
in second class postal rates provided by 
Congress is permitted to stand without 
modification or amendment, a very con- 
siderable number of the magazines 
printed in the United States will be put 
out of business — and incidentally I shall 
be put out of business." This follows 
the statement, "Practically to an exclu- 
sive extent I earn my living by writing 
for magazines." A wide circle of com- 
petent judges of such matters already 
held his opinion that "A law which in- 
creases second class postal rates from 
50 to 900 per cent, through a zone sys- 
tem, on national periodicals circulated in 
this country and its possessions amounts 
to confiscation and destruction." 

The zone system is a discarded ma- 
chine picked out of the scrap heap. 
President Lincoln abolished it in 1863 
because it was inequitable. Some one 
has asked, "Why should one be taxed 
for not living in the East?" Corre- 
spondence has been held to have been 
restricted by the zone system applying 
to first class matter from 1792 until about 
the middle of the nineteenth century. 
Actual experiment long conducted ought 
never to be ignored. This law is not 
fresh, bright invention ; it is rusty, scrap 
heap material. The critical present is 
no time to trust what has been thor- 
oughly tried and completely discarded. 
It is an ill service to America to cut off 
sources of intelligence which are main 
fountains and vitally needed. This is 
rather giving aid to an enemy. It like- 
wise nullifies the chief antidote of false 



propaganda. Few things could be less 
American or more foreign to America 
than crushing a printing press. Like 
House Bill 5712, the meddling zone law 
is fitted to deepen the ditch into which 
the blind lead the blind. 



OPENING AND CONCLUSION. 

A recent editorial article in a leading 
organ of Odd-Fellowship opens as fol- 
lows: "John Locke manifested the fullest 
appreciation of life when he said that 
'the greatest study of mankind is man.' 
And it may well mean to us that it is the 
'greatest,' not only in its extensiveness, 
its comprehensiveness, but also in its im- 
portance as a factor in human progress." 

Although we have been unable to veri- 
fy this quotation, it is by no means dif- 
ficult to conceive of such a sentiment as 
emanating from Locke's philosophic 
"Essay on the Human Understanding." 
Yet it would be no impossible slip of the 
pen to credit a short quotation from a 
poet to a philosopher. Locke is not, 
however, the only prose writer who says 
nearly the same thing that is more 
familiarly known as a sentiment of the 
poet, Alexander Pope. For instance, 
Pierre Charron, a noted French philoso- 
pher, had said about 90 years before 
Locke's "Essay" was published, in his 
own "Treatise on Wisdom," that "The 
true science and the true study of man 
is man." The same proposition appeared 
in the first edition of Charron's "Moral 
Essays" in this form : "The only science 
of mankind is man." Charron having 
died in 1603, and Locke not having been 
born until 1632, it is possible that the 
later English philosopher adopted the 
sentiment of his French predecessor or 
translated his words in recognized quota- 
tion. 

Guilliame de Salluste du Bartas, a 
French poet who died in 1590, exactly 
100 years before Locke's "Essay" was 
issued, is rendered as follows in a trans- 
lation by J. Sylvester : 
"There is no theme more plentiful to 

scan 
Than is the glorious, goodly frame of 
man." 

Blaise Pascal, the French author of 
"Provincial Letters," whose death in 
1662 preceded by more than a quarter of 
a century the publication of Locke's "Es- 



86 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 191! 



say on the Human Understanding," ex- 
pressed the same thought in another 
form by saying: "I thought that I should 
find plenty of companions in the study 
of man, and that this was the study 
which in truth was fit for him." The 
poetical "Essay on Man" by Alexander 
Pope, followed John Locke's "Essay" in 
1734, at the distance of a little less than 
half a century. "Epistle Second" of the 
poem begins: 

"Know then thyself, presume not God to 

scan; 
The proper study of mankind is man." 

The alleged prose quotation from 
Locke reads: "The greatest study of 
mankind is man," thus varying in only 
one word. 

It is not impossible that the quotation 
in the Odd-Fellow periodical was made 
from memory, inadvertently altered, and 
erroneously credited to the wrong 
author. 

A slip in the quotation itself would be 
more pardonable that a not quite ob- 
viously relevant use of it to begin a 
rather rambling article, the upshot of 
which at length comes to light as an ad- 
vocacy of lowering the age of admission 
into the order of Odd-Fellows from 21 
to 18. 



PLURAL OF KNIGHT TEMPLAR. 

There need be no question about the 
form of the name Knights Templars 
when it is used as a compound proper 
name. In a case where Templar is pur- 
posely made an adjective, while Knights 
is the only noun, there may, for that rea- 
son, be an exception, but the full com- 
pound noun should give the plural inflec- 
tion to both parts of the title. Some 
compound nouns are hyphenated ; for ex- 
ample, editor-in-chief. Others are print- 
ed solid; for instance, sawhorse. This 
one, however, belongs in the class with 
Lord Justice, Gentleman Usher, plural- 
ized by adding the letter "s" to each part 
of the word, as in the case of Lords 
Justices. The degree of the Knights 
Templars is the Knight Templar decree, 
each member of which is a Knight Tem- 
plar. This accords with the analogy 
which makes the degree of the Entered 
Apprentices the Entered Apprentice de- 
gree ; and the form seems preferable, at 
least, as well as perhaps the only one 



well authorized by custom. The original 
order, from which the name has been 
adopted, was founded in the twelfth cen- 
tury and suppressed early in the four- 
teenth. Real Knight Templarism thus 
ended 400 years before even the first 
form of Masonic Gi;and Lodgism began. 
"The Knights are dust, their swords are 
rust," and "What's in a name?" 



DR. MacARTHUR'S ADMONITION. 

In his department in The Watchman- 
Examiner, which carries the heading 
"This and That," Dr. MacArthur, who 
has long ranked among the ablest and 
most successful preachers in America, 
gives the first section in the issue of 
October seventh to the "Death of James 
Keir Hardie." Of this section we ven- 
ture to quote a part, having give'n due 
credit not only to the brilliant writer but 
likewise to the brilliant journal. What- 
ever may be thought of the position tak- 
en, these words are still worth ponder- 
ing; and the present writer can testify, 
that after a quarter of a century of se- 
rious study and reflection during which 
he has pondered not only the material of 
instruction but also the method, he is 
deeply impressed with the need of pre- 
senting the affirmations together with 
the negations pertaining to our Chris- 
tion reform. May it not be true that 
we often sacrifice the advantage of pow- 
erful antithesis? 

Affirmations and Negations Should Be 
Presented Together. 

It is in the latter half of his paragraph 
that Dr. MacArthur says, in what strikes 
the reader as a somewhat altered tone: 
"Mr. Hardie spoke sneeringly of King- 
George. He so spoke of all men and 
things which he disliked, and he disliked 
almost everything. He accomplished 
but little. He was noisy, but not effec- 
tive. He left Britain, economically and 
socially, practically as he found it. He 
was more intolerant than are those in 
the highest places. Men of this type ac- 
complish but little in church or state. 
Lloyd George is constructive, and not 
merely destructive. He is making his 
power felt along the whole line of Brit- 
ish life. Mr, Hardie was devoted to the 
workingman, but he was not efficient in 
the social and political field. The 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



87 



world's work is done by creators, and 
not by destroyers." 

Frankly, we think that in this final 
sentence the case is somewhat over- 
stated ; but the case is there, and not to 
be also overlooked. It is not the high- 
est praise to say of an army or a con- 
quering people, ''They made a wilder- 
ness and called it peace." Better by far 
than this pagan history, is the prophetic 
assurance, 

"For ye shall go out with joy, 
And be led forth with peace ; 
* * * * * * * 

Instead of the thorn will come up the 

fir tree, 
And instead of the brier will come up 

the myrtle tree." 



The characteristic of the times is great 
religiousness without spirituality. The 
reason for this is partly due to the 
growth of Secret Societies. The lodge 
"Burial Service" in June number and the 
article on the "Mystic Banquet" of the 
Scotch Rite are evidences of what has 
produced the hope of future and eternal 
bliss in the minds of men who despise 
the blood of the atonement and have no 
desire for the Spirit filled life. 

i£eto£ of ®uv Wiotk 

EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. 15. STODDARD. 

This finds me in Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, "the garden spot of the 
U. S." Weather is favorable, and pros- 
pects for good crop cheers the farmers. 
The stress and excitement of war condi' 
tions is constantly in evidence. What 
is the poor man to do, with prices going 
up? How can the reform agent meet the 
bills, with the cost of travel almost 
doubled? These are probleems indeed. 
Reading the papers, one might think there 
is plenty of money to waste. This eve- 
ning's paper tells of a "Nest of Owls" or- 
ganized yesterday, June i6th, at Ephrata, 
Pennsylvania, with an enrollment of 263 
persons. Think of it, 263 people sup- 
posed to be men and women created in 
the image of God, in a village town, in 
a time like this, forming themselves into 
an "Owl's Nest," with all that such a 
nesting means ! 



My health has not been the best and 
hindrances have not been few, but some- 
thing has been accomplished. My ser- 
mon-lecture given in a Church of the 
Brethren in the country yesterday was 
largely attended, and a kindly response 
in Cynosure subscriptions has been 
made by those interested. In the evening 
the writer was one of a wagon load to 
go several miles to a very helpful meet- 
ing held in a large farmhouse. Much 
truth relating to the general subject of 
"Intercessory prayer" was brought out. 
Lodge prayers can not be intercessory, as 
they lack the intercessor ! Surely Chris- 
tians will be praying, not merely saying 
prayers, in these times ! 

A night at the Old Folks' Home, Neffs- 
ville, gave opportunity for a renewal of 
a pleasant acquaintance, and for partici- 
pation in a devotional service. This home 
is well fitted and adapted to the comfort 
of the eighty or more who occupy it, un- 
der the skillful oversight of Elder Isaaj: 
W. Taylor, its manager. Lodge grips or 
signs would be of no value to one seek- 



ing entrance there. 



Some days of the past month have 
been given to my home city, the Capi- 
tal of our great nation. This city,, as 
might be expected, is overcrowded with 
the busy workers called in to help "Uncle 
Sam." I note the various lodges have 
been unusually active in offering enter- 
tainment and soliciting the membership 
of the soldier boys. 

At Alexandria, Oakton, Manassas and 
Nokesville, Virginia, I have labored with 
some degree of success. Friends have 
manifested a willingness to share in the 
trials of the work that to me has been 
cheering indeed. God has sustained us 
in the past. He is with us in the present. 
We may look with hope to the future. 



SOUTHERN AGENT'S LETTER. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

1 was indeed glad to hear of the good 
Annual Meeting which the National 
Christian Association had last month. 

Since my last letter I have visited two 
religious associations and was given the 
privilege of speaking to those assembled. 
I also visited Vacherie, Louisiana, where 
I delivered two sermons in the Secor/1 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



Baptist Church. Rev. G. James, pastor 
of this church, is one of the most earnest 
and faithful of God's shepherds. I also 
attended a Red Cross meeting of several 
hundred colored people and which, under 
the leadership of Mr. Foubre, raised 
$159.89 for Red Cross work. The col- 
ored people of Houma, Louisiana, also 
held a Red Cross meeting and raised 
$3,000 for the work. I next visited St. 
Patrick, Louisiana, but owing to the ab- 
sence of the pastor, Rev. J. Ellis, I had 
no appointment. However, I remained 
and preached for Rev. E. E. Dorsey's 
people, but rain greatly hindered the 
gathering of the people. 

By special invitation of my old friends, 
Rev. W. H. F. Nixon and Rev. S. Muse, 
I visited Paincourtville, Louisiana. In 
Brother Nixon's church I preached two 
sermons and also delivered one lecture, 
and before Brother Muse's people one 
sermon and one lecture. I received a 
donation of $3.15 from Rev. Muse's 
church, but owing to the rain which hin- 
dered the people from gathering at Rev. 
Nixon's church the offering was small. 
I next visited Napoleonville, where I lec- 
tured for Rev. I. Walker's people, but 
there, too, we were hindered by rain. I 
later went to Lafourche Crossing, Louisi- 
ana, where I met the Fifth District 
Association in session and was given 
the opportunity of lecturing, and I also 
received a contribution of $2. At Rev. 
G. James' church, where I spent an eve- 
ning, his good people donated $4.50 to 
our work. Rev. James has severed all 
lodge ties. 

Secretism is very strong in communi- 
ties where each of the above churches 
are located, but there are a few at each 
place bearing testimony against the un- 
fruitful works of darkness. 

I have been invited to hold Bible In- 
stitutes at Englishtown, Mereau, St. Pat- 
rick, Paincourtville and Algiers, Louisi- 
ana. Pray for the outpouring of the 
Holy Spirit. 



The atoning death of Jesus can avail 
only for those who, acknowledging its 
preciousness, consent to stand in the 
value thereof. They, and they alone, 
can be said to "Have redemption through 
His Blood, even the forgiveness of sins." 
— Frank H. White. 



LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

St. Louis, Mo., June 8, 1918. 
Dear Cynosure: 

I thank God that I am able to write 
again. My health has been very poor 
the past winter, but the hot weather in 
the South makes me feel a good deal 
better. 

On the 15th of December I left Mem- 
phis, Tenn., to visit my daughter in 
Omaha, Neb. The winter there was the 
coldest I have ever witnessed, though 1 
have seen fifty-eight winters. I was un- 
able to do much work in Omaha, being 
sick in bed the first fifteen days after 1 
reached my daughter's home and later 
the weather became too cold for me to 
go out, but when the weather moderated 
a little I held cottage meetings. 

The pastors of the various churches in 
Omaha knew I was the woman that 
taught against the secret orders so they 
steered clear of me, but the Lord let me 
get into the homes of the people to teach 
and four were saved from sin. After 
we had held cottage meetings for awhile, 
the people were anxious to secure a 
larger place in which we could hold our 
meetings. An old minister, who had a 
mission, told us we might hold a few 
meetings in his mission if we would pay 
rent, so we held services there for a 
month or more. But the gospel was too 
straight for him, so one Sunday when 
we arrived at the mission he had locked 
the door and so we were obliged to go 
back to the cottage work of preaching 
and teaching the blessed truth from 
house to house. Finally the people got 
together and rented a mission hall, but 
then I took sick with pneumonia and 
typhoid fever, which kept me in bed for 
thirty days. One day while I was sick, 
my daughter was out in her yard talking 
to a high Mason who lives next door. She 
told him that I had some Masonic rituals, 
but not believing her, she ran into the 
house and got a ritual and showed it to 
him. I was in bed and when I heard him 
talking very loud and angrily, I got up 
and looked out of the window. He was 
a big black man, weighing about 200 
pounds, and he was so angry that he 
looked ashey. He told my daughter that 
she had no business with those books 
and that "we can take our books." My 
daughter said, Is this your ritual? He 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



89 



said, "Yes, it is our book, and we can 
demand these books from anybody who 
does not belong to the Order." She said, 
Well, I did not know your secrets, but 
now you have broken your Masonic vow. 
You say these are your secrets, and now 
you are in danger of being killed if your 
lodge finds out that you have broken 
your vow. You promised not to "tell, 
write, print, paint, stamp, stain, cut, 
carve, mark or engrave the secrets nor 
cause the same to be done on anything 
movable or immovable Capable of receiv- 
ing the least impression of a word, syl- 
lable, letter or character whereby they 
may become legible or intelligible to any 
person or persons under the canopy of 
heaven, and the secrets of Freemasonry 
unlawfully obtained through my un- 
worthiness." You told me, she said, that 
this contains the Masonic, secrets, and 
that you and your brother Masons are 
coming here to take these books away 
from my mother and also to get the fel- 
low who gave out your secrets. Well, 
now, you are the one who has given them 
away to me, and you are now in danger 
of having your throat cut across and 
your tongue torn out by its roots and 
buried in the rough sands of the sea at 
low-water mark. He looked at her and 
grinned and hushed up, and we never 
heard any more from him. I was very 
sick at the time this took place, but I 
could not keep from laughing to see a 
man give his secrets away like that and 
who did not have sense enough to know 
that he did until my daughter told him. 

When the Devil makes a fool out of a 
man, he surely does a good job. God 
bless and help- me to continue teaching 
from the Bible and to show the secret 
work of the Devil. Two have been saved 
from the lodge in Omaha, and of the 
four who were saved from all sin two 
were delivered from the lodge evil. 

During my stay in Omaha I distributed 
many tracts. This stirred up the preach- 
ers, who began to preach sermons fight- 
ing this truth, and often their own mem- 
bers would come and tell me about it. 
They did not want their people to know 
the evils of oath-bound secret societies. 

When returning home from Omaha, I 
stopped at Kansas City, Missouri, where 
I lectured one evening on "The Sin of 
Masonry." A man came to me the next 



evening and said, "If you expose Ma- 
sonry to-night you will be taken off that 
platform." That evening the Lord gave 
me strength and courage to speak the 
Word with boldness (Acts 4:29) and He 
let me feel no fear whatever. When I 
took out a Masonic ritual and showed it 
to the whole congregation, one man sit- 
ting in the rear said, "Well, you are right, 
sister." I was told the next day that 
he was a saloon man, and yet he knew 
that Christian people had no business to 
unite with the secret lodge where all 
kinds of sinning men congregate. They 
did not get me that night, however. At 
the close of the meeting many came to 
me and said, "Your lesson has taken me 
out of my lodge now and for all time." I 
sold one Masonic ritual, and, though Ma- 
sonic men looked on, they held their 
peace. 

Every now and then the Devil makes 
some of his fools tell on themselves, and 
the Devil has more fools in the world 
than black ones to tell their secrets. 
Satan has some professional fools, both 
black and white, and I truly feel sorry 
for them. I was once one of them, but 
never a lodge fool. I had enough com- 
mon sense to know that God made me 
and that I did not need to pay out my 
money to get somebody to make me over 
again. I used to be like the fool in Psalm 
fourteen. I would say that there was no 
good, and I should have known better, 
If there is no good, then all are bad ; if 
we are not right, we are wrong; if we 
are not saints, we are sinners; if we 
are not on our way to Heaven, we are 
on our way to Hell. We cannot be both 
right and wrong, but there are many 
fools like I was once. They are not all 
dead yet. It is impossible to serve Ma- 
sonry and Jesus Christ, at the same time, 
for Jesus never spoke anything in secret 
(John 18:20), and thus He could not be 
a Mason, as the Masons claim Him to 
have been. 

I visited a state meeting at England, 
Arkansas, where I got around and dis- 
tributed tracts among the people. There 
were a goodly number of white people 
out every night. I taught Bible lessons 
every morning to the women. We taught 
the women to give up their idol worship 
and pray to the living God who is able 
to deliver us out of our distress. 



90 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



God bless all the officers and members 

and readers of the Cynosure. Pray that 

my strength may be renewed day by day. 

Yours for Him, who said, I am the door. 

Lizzie W. Roberson. 



TENNESSEE, CATHOLICISM, AND 
MASONRY. 
Dear Mr. Phillips : 

Being a constant reader of the Cyno- 
sure and enjoying the subject matter so 
much I feel I must thank you and con- 
gratulate you highly on the splendid 
product in the interest of the great cause 
espoused. Long live the NATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION and its 
organ, The Cynosure! 

I was very much interested in the 
number in which you called attention to 
the attack made on Roman Catholicism 
by The Menace and other papers who so 
strongly defend Masonry and the lodges. 

While I have no tolerance for Roman 
Catholicism or the Knights of Columbus 
which The Menace, The Yellow Jacket 
and other papers are ever attacking with 
ceaseless energy, I feel and know, as 
thousands of other Tennessee people feel 
and know, that our lodge ridden state, in 
regard to free press and free speech, has 
been hurt ten thousand times more by 
Masonry and other lodges than it has 
ever been hurt by Roman Catholicism. 
Never has it yet been known in Ten- 
nessee that a statute law prohibited a 
citizen from having a Catholic Bible ; 
and yet we are living every day under a 
state law making it a hundred dollars 
fine for a citizen to be found with a 
lodge ritual on his premises. Never yet 
has our grand old state of Tennessee 
sent a United States Senator to the Capi- 
tol City to work for a law to make it a 
thousand dollar fine for a citizen of these 
United States to possess a Catholic Bi- 
ble, yet that is the very thing we have 
done in relation to the lodge rituals. 
Positively I am no Catholic, but "O Con- 
sistency, thou art a jewel !" I am al- 
most ashamed to be called a Tennessean. 
May God help us — and He will, and 
that right early. We are getting togeth- 
er in East Tennessee with men and 
money, and hope soon to engage the 
services of some able speaker to make a 
tour through the state and make anti- 



secret society speeches. But such great 
matters must necessarily move slowly. 

Take me into your confidence and help 
me all you can. As a* seceding Mason I 
am entirely against the system. The 
happiest days of my life have been since 
I quit the lodge. I shall soon send an 
order for literature and shall want an 
open letter printed for distribution 
among my brethren. 

God bless you in your arduous labors. 
May you keep well and live long. 
Your friend in Christ Jesus, 



THE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST. 
A Testimony. 

The Apostle to the Corinthians and to 
all believers in Christ, said : "Be not 
unequally yoken together with unbeliev- 
ers. For what fellowship hath right- 
eousnes with unrighteousness, and what 
communion hath light with the darkness? 
And what concord hath Christ with Be- 
lial? And what part hath he that be- 
lieveth with an infidel? Wherefore come 
out from among them and be ye separate 
saith the Lord, and touch not the un- 
clean thing; and I will receive you, and 
will be a Father unto you, and ye shall 
be my sons and daughters, saith the 
Lord Almighty." II Cor. 6:14-18. 

Beloved, in this we can see that God 
will not honor us as his children until 
we are willing to hear his word and heed 
the call, and come out of every worldly 
man-made creed and organization; and 
be holy unto the Lord. And if we must 
come out and be separate from the sec- 
tarian denominational churches in order 
to be holy unto God, surely we must 
come out of secret societies, for surely 
the churches are better than the lodges. 
For the churches do profess Christ and 
they do pretend to love and honor the 
Lord, but the lodges don't require any 
profession of Him to join, and don't pre- 
tend to worship Him in their meetings. 
Why then can we see and say we must 
come out of the sect churches to be holy, 
and want to remain in some sinful se- 
cret order among infidels, skeptics, gam- 
blers and unbelieving sinners of the 
deepest die. Yet with disregard for 
God's word telling us to come out- from 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



91 



among them, and to the lost of the soul. 
Yet for the sake of a coffin and a vain 
heathen ceremony of sinners over the 
dead body, and for the sake of a few 
dollars left for others, many times to 
fuss, fight and lose their souls about. 
Some are wanting to live in God's 
church and stay in the world's lodges. 
But Jesus has said ye cannot serve God 
and mammon, and I find that all the peo- 
ple that are not willing to give up the 
lodges will get angry when you tell them 
what the Lord has said in his word 
about these things. And because we 
have had patience with the people to give 
them time to see the light of the word 
on these things and hear the voice of 
God and come on out. 

I find that some are now beginning to 
rebel and fight against the light as it 
comes to them, and attempt to justify 
themselves in remaining in the lodges. 
Therefore I am writing this in order that 
it may be understood everywhere in all 
the churches of the saints, that no one 
can stay in any secret order and have 
fellowship with the Church of God in 
Christ. So choose ye this day whom ye 
will serve, for no man can serve two 
masters. There is no need of any dis- 
cussion with anyone on this subject. 
Since we cannot serve the two, just de- 
cide which one you will serve and let 
the other alone. Does the Bible con- 
demn secret orders? Yes. the Bible 
condemns them from start to end. 
First, the Bible says, Swear not at all. 
Matt. 5:34; James 5:12. They make 
you swear to get in them, and if you are 
not very careful they will make you fight, 
curse and swear to stay in them. They 
blindfold you and darken the room to 
take one in. Jesus said, "When men 
prefer darkness rather than light it is 
because their deeds are evil." John 
3:19. They whisper the pass words. 
Solomon said, "A whisper separateth 
chief friends. Prov. 16:28. The apos- 
tle said whispering was an evil practiced 
by those whom the Lord had given over 
to work all uncleanness. Rom. 1 :2S-2g. 
They say Solomon was a secret order 
man, but Solomon said, "A wicked man 
winketh with his eye, he speaketh with 
his feet; he teacheth with his fingers.'' 
Prov. 6:12-13, Some of them say Jesus 



was a Mason, but Jesus said, "In secret 
have I said nothing." John 18:20. 
— The Whole Truth, May-June, 1916. 



FEDERALIZING RAILROAD 
MANAGEMENT. 

Director General McAdoo will place 
in direct charge of each railroad for op- 
erating purposes a representative to be 
known as a Federal manager. These 
Federal managers will be chosen, so far 
as practicable, from the operating offices 
of their respective railroads. 

The Federal manager of each railroad 
will endeavor to avail himself to the full- 
est extent of his railroad organization. 
This, it is believed, will secure the best 
results during Government control, and 
reassure the officers and employes of the 
railroads and the stockholders of the 
protection of the just interest of all. 

The responsibility for the operation of 
the roads will be directly upon the re- 
gional directors to whom the Federal 
managers report, and not upon the rail- 
road board of directors, though the lat- 
ter will be consulted and accorded the 
fullest opportunity to keep advised of 
the operation of the properties. 

The regional directors and Federal 
managers will be required to sever their 
official relations with their respective 
companies and become exclusively rep- 
resentatives of the United States Rail- 
road Administration. 

The effect of this order will be to take 
away the authority of the presidents of 
the respective railroads, but it is thought 
that in many cases the presidents of the 
railroads will be made Federal man- 
agers. It will largely be a change of 
status and authority rather than of per- 
sonnel, and while not militating against 
the welfare of the various roads, will 
secure the fullest co-operation and unity 
in the Government administration of 
transportation. It is simply a federaliza- 
tion of railroad management. 

With this change will come a large 
reduction in salaries, though it is be- 
lieved that most of the regional direc- 
tors will receive a greater salary than 
Secretary McAdoo himself. 



A sinner cannot look up if he realizes 
his doom, and a saint cannot look down 
if he realizes his destiny. — Selected. 



92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



STANDARD WORKS 



ON 



Secret Societies 



FOR SALE BY THE 



National Christian Association, 



HOW TO ORDER: 

PRICES quoted in this catalogue include car- 
riage prepaid by mail. Orders by insured mail, 
5c extra. 

TERMS — Cash with order. We do not wish 
to open accounts with individuals. When prices 
are not known, send sufficient and any balance 
will be returned to you. 

C. O. D. orders will not be filled unless $1.00 
accompanies the order. No books shipped on 
approval. 

REMIT by Bank Draft on Chicago or New 
York, or by Post Office or Express Money Or- 
ders. Personal checks should have oc extra added 
for collection. 

WRITE your name and address plainly and in 
full, giving street number, post office box, R. 
F. D. number and box, and when ordering by 
express, give your express office if it is differ- 
ent from your post office address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASS'N. 

850 W. MADISON STREET. CHICAGO, ILL. 



STANDARD BOOKS 



ON FREEMASONRY 



FINNEY ON MASONRY, 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 



FREEMASONRY: An Interpretation. 

By Martin L. Wagner, pastor of St. Johns 
English Evangelical Lutheran Church Dayton, 
Ohio, with an introduction by the Rev. G. H. 
Gerberding, D. D., professor of Practical Theol- 
ogy in the Theological Seminary of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church at Chicago, Illinois. 
This is a new book, and is a candid discussion 
of the institution Freemasonry, and offers an 
interpretation of its veiled expressions, art, 
speech, religion and ethics, and of its symbols, 
emblems and ceremonies. This interpretation is 
based upon hints given and statements made 
by the highest Masonic authorities and tested 
in the light of sources from which these claim 
that Freemasonry is derived. Cloth, 560 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

MASONIC TEMPLES. 

A clear discussion of the religion of Masonry, 
by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. Contents: What is a 
Temple? Not Other Religions But the Christian 
Religion. The Lodge Bible Not the Christian 
Bible. The Masonic Religion Not the Christian 
Religion. Who or What is the Masonic God? 
The Roman Pantheon. Lodge Morals and Chris- 
tian Morals. 32 pages. 5 cents. $3.50 per hun- 
dred. 



FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland^ Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
•otes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
khe truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of 
Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book 
gives the work and ritual of Blue Lodge 
Masonry, the proper position of each officer 
in the Lodge-room, order of opening and clos- 
ing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry." Illustrated 
with 85 engravings. Contains the "unwrit- 
ten" work. New Revised Edition, enlarged 
to 275 pages; flexible cloth $1.00, paper 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and 
illustrations. It gives the correct method of 
conferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the 
oaths, obligations, signs, grips and passwords. 
All of which are correct and can be relied upon. 
The accuracy of this work has been attested by 
high and unimpeachable Masonic authority. 
Cloth, $1.25; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



95 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages in cloth, $1.50; paper, $1.00. 

EXPLANATORY. 
"Handbook of Freemasonry" and "Chap- 
ter Degrees," and "Knight Templarism 
Illustrated" give the 13 degrees of the York 
Rite. There are 33 degrees in the Scotc^ 
Rite, but the first three degrees as given 
in the "Handbook of Freemasonry" belong 
to both the York and Scotch Rites. These 
five books give 43 different degrees without 
duplicating. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition. 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
;hree Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

ADOPTIVE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the 
five degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas 
Lowe, comprising the degrees of Jephthah's 
Daughter, Ruth, Esther, Martha, and Electa, and 
known as the Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, 
Wife's Degree, Sister's Degree and the Benevolent 

FREEMASONRY EXPOSED 

By Capt. "William Morgan. The genuine 
old Morgan Book; republished with engrav- 
ing's, showing the lodge room, dress of can- 
didates, signs, due-guards, grips, etc. This 
revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
murdered the author for writing it. 25 cents. 

MAH-HAH-BONE. 

Comprising "The Master's Carpet," which 
illustrates and explains the religious symbolism 
of the first three degrees of Freemasonry, and the 
"Hand-Book of Freemasonry," a complete and ac- 
curate exposure of the three degrees of Ancient 
Craft Masonry. By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master 
of Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago, Illinois. A 
volume of 679 pages, Cloth, $1.50; 

THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. Explains the true 
source and religious meaning of every symbol of 
the Blue Lodge, showing the basis on which the 
ritual is founded. By careful perusal of this 
work a thorough knowledge of the spiritual prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry can be obtained. Every 
Mason, every person contemplating becoming a 
member of the fraternity, and even those who 
are indifferent on the subject, should procure and 
carefully read this book. 406 pages, illustrated 
with 50 engravings. 75 cents. 

FREEMASONRY AT A GLANCE. 

Containing the illustrated secrets of thirteen 
degrees of Freemasonry; Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Commandery degrees. Also the 
ceremonies, signs, grips, passwords, etc., de- 
scribed and illustrated. 

Paper cover, 10 cents each. 



OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGP.EEf 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

AMERICAN FREEMASONRY 

"A Study in American Freemasonry," based 
upon Pike's "Morals and Dogma of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite," "Mackey's Masonic 
Ritualist," "The Encyclopaedia of Freemason- 
ry" and other American masonic standard 
works. By Arthur Preuss, Editor of the Cath- 
olic Fortnightly Review. Among the chapters 
in this book are: "Is American Masonry a Re- 
ligion?" "The God of American Freemasonry," 
"American Freemasonry and the Kabbalistie 
Jehovah," "American Freemasonry and the Bi- 
ble," "Masonic Morality," etc. Cloth, 433 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

GRAND LODGE VS. JUDGE WHITNEY. 

Judge Daniel H. Whitney was Master of Bel 
videre Masonic Lodge, No. 60 (Illinois), when S. 
L. Keith, a member of his lodge, murdered Ellen 
Slade. Judge Whitney, by attempting to bring 
Keith to justice, brought on himself the ven- 
geance of the lodge ; but he boldly replied to the 
charges against him, and afterwards renounced 
Masonry. 15 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF FREE- 
MASONRY 

As proved in court in the New Berlin trial. 
Also the letter of Hon. Richard Rush, to the 
Anti-Masonic Committee of York Co., Pa., 
May 4th, 1831. The New Berlin Trials began 
in the attempt of Freemasons to prevent pub- 
lic initiations by seceding Masons. These 
trials were held at New Berlin, Chenango Co., 
N. Y., April 13 and 14, 1831. General Augus- 
tus C. Welsh, Sheriff of the County, and oth- 
er adhering Freemasons swore to the truth- 
ful revelation of the Oaths and Penalties. 
Single Copy, 10 cents. 

HISTORY OF THE ABDUCTION AND MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 
As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 25 
cents. 

HON. THURLOW WEED ON THE MORGAN 
ABDUCTION. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Captain Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal 
to Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario, the discovery of the body at Oak Orchard 
Creek and the two inquests thereon. Mr. Weed 
testifies from his own personal knowledge of these 
ihrilling events. This pamphlet also contains an 
mgraving of the monument and statue erected to 
the memory of the martyred Morgan at Batavia, 
N. Y., and unveiled in September, 1882, for which 
occasion Mr. Weed's statement was originally pre- 
pared 5 cents. 
EX-PRESiuENT JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. There are only a few of 
these books in print, and they are not in the best 
condition. They can be furnished, in paper, at 
50 cents a copy. 

VALANCE'S CONFESSION OF THE MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

This confession of Henry L. Valance, one 
of the three Freemasons . who drowned Mor- 
gan in the Niagara River, was taken from 
the lips of the dying man by Dr. Jorln C. 
Emery, of Racine County, Wisconsin, in 1848. 
The confession bears clear evidence of truth- 
fulness. Single copy, 10 cents. 



94 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



WAS WASHINGTON A MASON? 

& By President Charles A. Blanchard. This 
is the best contribution yet written on the 
question of Washington's relation to Free- 
masonry. 10 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO- 
PATRIOTS OPPOSED TO SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 

This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
3tatesmen and their testimonies vindicating them 
from any charge of adherence to secret societies. 
10 cents. 
WASHINGTON. 

What kind of a Freemason was he? 4 pages; 
postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents; a package of 75 
copies for 25 cents. 

fv*xvmM& OF THE GODS. 

6« i. K. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
fe^fthology of Rome, Greece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
ffftr.Vffia. Scandinavia, Africa and America, showiaa 
tnr TZizzizn and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous vorship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 10 
cents. 

MISCELLANEOUS 



MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
Wheaton College, President National Christian As- 
sociation, Ex-President Sabbath Association of 
Illinois, etc. 

A brief treatise for busy people and especially 
intended for ministers and teachers. 

Part first answers objections and clears away 
the obstacles to a candid consideration of the 
fundamental questions involved. Part second 
treats of Freemasonry as the key to the whole 
subject. Part third relates to subsidiary organ- 
izations, — industrial, insurance, temperance and 
other lodges. Part fourth considers important 
Questions growing out of this discussion. 320 

FOLLY, EXPENSE AND DANGER OF SE- 
CRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, President of Whea- 
ton College. They may be rudely classified as 
religious ; e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfel- 
lowship, the Knights of Pythias, etc. ; political, ap 
the Know-Nothings, Knights' of the Golden Circle 
the Order of American Deputies, the Ku Kluft 
Klan, the White League, etc. ; industrial, as tht: 
unions of carpenters, bricklayers, conductors, en 
gineers, etc. ; insurance, as the Royal Arcanum, t\ 
Modern Woodmen, the Order of the Iron Hall, th- 
Order of United American Mechanics, etc. ; anli 
social, as the college fraternities. 5 cents. 

SECREl SOCIETIES ILLUSTRATED. 

Comprising the so-called "secrets" (the 
signs, grips, pass- words, emblems, etc.) of 
Freemasonry (Blue Lodge and to the thirteenth 
degree of the American Rite, and the Scottish 
Rite), Adoptive Masonry (the Eastern Star), 
Oddfellowship (Lodge, Encampment, and Re- 
bekah degrees), the Good Templars, Temple of 
Honor, United Sons of Industry, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Grange. Over 250 cuts; 99 
pages; paper cover, 35 cents. 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. E> a, 
Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, and 
guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a sketch 
of the origin, history and character of the order, 
over one hundred foot-note quotations from stand- 
ard authorities, showing the character and teach- 
ings of the order, and an analysis of each degree 
by President J. Blanchard. This ritual corre- 
sponds exactly with the "Charge Books" furnished 
by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Cloth, $1.50; 
paper cover, $1.00. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting Rebekah Lodges, and Installation of Officers 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, witb 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Clotii, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

»jeujpiete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
^"'ary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hrmns. 35 cents. 

ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA 

1899 Ritual as printed by J. W. Franko & 
Sons, Peoria, Illinois. This order is the fe« 
male auxiliary of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 10 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, ChVafs 
Degree ; with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 oent* , 
gaper, 35 cents, 

EXPOSITION OF THE GRANGE 

Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated 
with engravings, showing lodge room, signs, 
signals, etc. 35 cents. 

FARMER'S EDUCATIONAL AND CO-OP. 
ERATIVE UNION OF AMERICA 

Initiation ceremonies; obligation; final 
charge; chaplain introduced; burial cere- 
mony, etc., etc. 5 cents. 

A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. k. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a rery excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience* 
ake from this order. 10 cents. 

GOOD TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED 

A full and accurate exposition of the de- 
grees of the Lodge, Temple and Council, with 
engravings showing the signs, grips, etc. 35 
cents. 

THE FORESTERS ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ilustrated ritual with Installa- 
tion Ceremonies of the United Order of Forest- 
ers, formerly known as the Independent Order 
of Foresters. 

Paper cover, 35 cents each. 

KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

The complete illustrated ritual and secrsts of 
the order as used in 1880. 
Paper cover, 35 cents each. 



July, 1918. 



christian cynosure 



95 



LIGHT ON THE LAST DAYS 

A book for the times! Being- familiar studies 
in the booK of Revelation. By President Charles 
A. .Blanchaid, D. D., of VVheaton College. We 
are approaching the times with which this book 
particularly deals. God has written these words 
for the help of His people in all ages, but they 
are of special impoitance to us and those who 
succeed us. Cloth, 152 pages. Price 75 cents 
net. By mail 85 cents. 

SECRET SOCIETIES, ANCIENT AND MOD^ 
ERN. 

Contents : The Antiquity of Secret Societies, 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinlan Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Masoiif 
Fllmore's and Webster's Deference to Masonry in 
the United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An Illustra- 
tion. The Conclusion. 50 cents. 

COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their customs, character, and efforts for their 
suppression. Containing the opinions of many 
college presidents, and others, and a full account 
of the murder of Mortimer Leggett. Compiled 
and edited by H. L. Kellogg. 25 cents. 

RONAYNE'S REMINISCENCES, 

Being an autobiography of his life and re- 
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(Mr. E. Ronayne is the author of the Handbook 
of Freemasonry; the Master's Carpet, Etc.) 
Cloth cover, 445 pages, price, 75 cents. 



FOR CHRISTIANS ONLY 



ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
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Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
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THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
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By ?<jv Robert Armstrong. 16 pages; 5 cents. 

ODD-FELLOWSHIP JUDGED 

by its own utterances; its doctrine and practice 
examined in light of God's Word. By Rev. J. H. 
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This is an exceedingly interesting, clear dis- 
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form of a dialogue. 

SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear 
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ent to all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
a most convincing argument against the Lodge. 
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SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
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PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
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A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
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ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THB 
INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
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THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST 

By Richard Horton. The Secret Empire 
Is a subject of prophecy. "Examine," says 
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PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
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SERMON ON MASONRY. 

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MASONIC SALVATION 

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FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THE 
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By "Spectator," Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
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SERMON ON MASONRY. 

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BETWEEN TWO OPINIONS. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of "Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc. Every one who loves to 
read a good story, chaste and elegant in ex- 
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should read this book upon the power of secret 
societies in politics, and the remedy. 389 pages ; 
cloth, 50 cents. 

THE MYSTIC TIE; 

Or Freemasonry a League with the Devil. 
This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
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MOODY CHURCH TESTIMONIALS. 

This valuable booklet contains the brief testi- 
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the pastors, assistant pastors and pulpit sup- 
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first fifty years of its existence. 64 pages. 15 
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CONGREGATIONAL TESTIMONIES. 

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THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH, 

or A Woman's Victory. 
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SECRET SOCIETIES. 

A discussion of their character and claims, 
by Rev. David MacDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and 
Rev. Edward Beecher. 96 pages; paper cc^er; 
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96 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1918. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
Penalties; Are Masonic Penalti.es Ever Enforced? 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers ; Disloyalty to Country ; Our Re° 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
16 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

THE OPEN CONFESSION 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
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tion of the Christian, and especially the Chris- 
tian minister, to the secret oath-bound lodge. 
16 pages; postpaid 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

MY REASONS 

For Not Joining the Masonic Fraternity, by 
Rev. R. A. Torrey, D. D., Dean of the Bible 
Institute of Los Angeles. 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in Them? 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN *' ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Ofher Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow? 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
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LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
Fatherhood of God," Discussed and Refuted. 4 
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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 
CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddfellowship? Ought Christians to 
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fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
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ARE INSURANCE LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra- 
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package of 75 for 25 cents. 
BAPTIST TESTIMONIES. 

From Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D., Rev. A. & 
Gordon, D. D., Rev. Nathaniel Colver, D. D., and 
others. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
package of 25 for 25 cents. 

PATRIOT AND THE LODGE. 

By Pres. C. A. Blanchard. From a patriotic 
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1912. 16 pages; postpaid, 2 cents a copy: a 
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COLLEGE FRATERNITIES. 

Consisting of testimonies of prominent edu- 
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FRATERNITIES IN STATE SCHOOLS. 

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VOR WOMEN WHO THINK 

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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Bull. 6 pages; post- 
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PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHItaS- 
TIANS FROM LODGES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
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paid, 2 cents a copy. 

CHURCH AND LODGE. 

An Address Delivered at Mr. Moody's "Con= 
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Mass., by President Charles A. Blanchard, D. D. 
IS pages; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

ODDFELLOWSHIP A RELIGIOUS INSTI« 

TUTION 
And Rival of the Christian Church. 8 pages; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a package of 25 for 
25 cents. 

WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

By Col. Ceorge R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
gree Mason, an officer of the Civil War, founder 
of "Pacific Garden Mission," Chicago, and a Chris- 
tian Worker of national reputation. 11 pages ; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 25 
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GRACIOUSLY DELIVERED 

From Seven Secret Societies. By Rev. E. G. 
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copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

Secret Societies in Relation to the Home. 
By Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D., pastor of Chicago 
Avenue (Moody) Church, Chicago. 3 pages ; post- 
paid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 
25 cents. 

TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haney, a minister and evangelist 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a seced- 
ing Mason, tells his experience and states his 
objections to the Lodge. A Christian Lodge Im- 
possible. Is the Lodge a Help or a Hindrance 
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WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS* 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
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THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, May 15, 1902. 

The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
The Greatest Masons are Our Teacbers. Is Free- 
masonry a Religion? Is the Masonic Religion Chris- 
tian? What Kind of Religion is It? Marks of 
Demon Worship. Our Duty. 24 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy, or $1.00 per hundred. 

MODERN PROPHETS OF BAAL. 

Or, Watchmen on Zion's Walls. By President 
C. A. Blanchard. A tract for ministers. "If 
we say Lord to any one who is not God, then 
we are worshippers of Baal, and if we, who are 
religious teachers, call any one Lord except the 
true God, then we are prophets of Baal." It 
shows the real relation of Masonic ministers to 
a heathen system, and gives the reasons why 
Christian preachers become prophets of Baal. 

In the appendix is a chapter on Masonic The- 
ology, taken from Mackey's "Masonic Ritualist"; 
and also "A Word to Bible Students," by Dean 
J. M. Gray, D. D., of the Moody Bible Institute. 
32 pages. Postpaid, 5 cents a copy; per hundred. 
$3.00. 

A package containing 20 or more of the above tracU 
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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

850 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



THE OPSN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray. Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address ateno- 
graphlcally reported for the National Christian 
Association at Its Annual Meeting, April I. 1910. 

The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath- bound 
lodge. 

that 



A Personal Testimony. — Three things 
kept Dr. Cray from Joining a lodge. 



Attacking Principles, Not Persons.— This is 
within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
Is of fundamental Importance. 

Describing a Mighty Adversary.— Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and Is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System. — Showing 
that it Is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 2 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS. 

> These consist of 20 different tracts, envelope 
size, of from four to sixteen pages each. Some 
of them are: Why I Left the Rebekah Lodge. 
Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left the 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merritt, the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
Secret Societies. The Church and the Lodge. 
Baptist Testimonies. Lodge Religion. The 
"Good Man" Argument. Masonic Obligations. 
Catechism of Oddfellowshlp. Oddfellowship a 
Religious Institution. Why Do Men Remain 
Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
Association. Two Nights in a Lodge Room. 
The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial Services. 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities in 
State Schools. For Women Who Think — Wom- 
en's Lodges. The Patriot and the Lodge. 
Each, 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madison St, CHICAGO, ILL. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
connection in all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of dimiasion." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
shows almost exclusively from quotations of prominent Woodmen, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
in the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
Joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7^. It contains four illustrations of 
seoret society paraphernalia. The list price is £5 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St., Chicago 



MODERN PROPHETS of BAAL 

OR 

WATCHMEN on ZION'S WALLS 

By President C. A. Blanchard. 

This is a tract especially intended for ministers. The term Baalism in referring to 
Masonry is used figuratively. "If we sayXord to any one who is not God, then we 
are worshipers of Baal and if we, who are religious teachers, call any one Lord 
except the true God, then we are prophets of Baal." This tract, in addition to setting 
forth the real relation of Masonic ministers to a heathen system, also gives the reasons 
why Christian preachers become prophets of Baal. 

In the appendix there is a chapter on Masonic Theology, taken from Mackey's "Masonic 
Ritualist", the author being the well known Past General Grand High Priest of the General 
Grand Chapter of the United States. There is also A Word to Bible Students, by Dean 
J. M. Gray, D. D., of the Moody Bible Institute, and there is a page of Bible quotations 
which are important in this connection. 

Thirty-two pages; Single copies three cents, per hundred, $2.00 postpaid. 



Address 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago Ills. 



PVrJr'HHHHi'r^Pr^Pl^Pr'HHHr'Hr'r'r'r'HHHHHr'rJ -J-'J-i-'.J-'.J-l^-J.J-J.J-J-J-'-i^JaJ^C ' 



THE POLAR STAR. 



Jonathan Blanchard. 

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Notlco to Readeral— When vou flnis.. reading thia magazine place a 1-cent atarop on thia notice, hand J*** J* 
9<mtml •tnployee, and it will be placed in the handa of our soldier* or sailor, at the front. No wrapping. No 
aaa. A. S. BURLESON, Postmaster General. 




VOL. LI. 



CHICAGO, AUGUST, 1918 



Number 4 





REV. JOHN D. HARTZLER, 
Frrmer President of Goshen College. 




OFFICIAL ORGAN* NATIONAL CHRISTIAN AJTOCIATION 
10 CEHTS A COPY EJTABUJHED 1868 U00 AYEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter Mav 19, 1897, 
nt the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
Mar. a 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Rev. John D. Hartzler, Former President 
of Goshen College .Cover 

Prayers for Victory and Peace Every 
Day at Noon 97 

An Unusual Funeral Service 97 

"Eagle's Wings" 97 

A Polygamous Chaplain 98 

The Morgan Monument, by Rev. David S. 
Warner 98 

Union Officials and Waiters Are Ac- 
cused of Drugging Non-Tipping Pa- 
trons — Chicago Herald and Examiner.. 99 

Methodists Establish an Orphanage in 
France 99 

Thoughts from Niagara Falls, by James 
E. Phillips 100 

Lique Franc Catholique, Canadian Anti- 
secrecy Association 100 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 101 

Elks Lodge Sues for Libel. Honolulu, 
Hawaii 106 

The Lodgeville Church, by Jennie L. 
Hardie. (Continued) 109 

Albert G. Mackey — The New Age, Ma- 
sonic Magazine 110 



Why I Am Not a Freemason, by Herman 
Newmark, Kobe, Japan Ill 

The Late Rev. B. F. Hester, by C. Floyd 
Hester 113 

Sustaining the Soldiers 1 14 

Contributions 115 

The German Docks 115 

Can a Freemason Be a Christian?, by 
Rev. L. O. Truth 115 

News of Our Work: 
The Ohio Lutheran Synod 123 

The Cynosure Hard Hit 124 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. 
B. Stoddard 121 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter," Mrs. L. W. 
Roberson 125 

Southern Agents Report, Rev. F. J 
Davidson 126 

From Our Correspondents 127 

Training School for Chaplains 128 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. John F. Heemstra ; 
Vice-President, Rev. J. H. B. Williams ; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. F. H. Peter- 
son ; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phil- 
lips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

M. P. F. Doermann, Thomas C. Mc- 
Knight, D. S. Warner, C. A. Blanchard, 
P. A. Kittilsby, H. A. Fischer, Jr., 
George Slager, A. H. Leaman, George 
W. Bond, and J. H. Hoekstra. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St., 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton, Calif. 

Eld. G. B. Crockett, Dermott, Ark. 



Vol. LI, No, 4. 



CHICAGO 



AUGUST 1918 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 



Mercy and truth unite. 
Oh, 'tis a wondrous sight, <» 

All sights* above; 
Jesus the curse sustains, 
Guilt's bitter cup He drains, 
Nothing for us remains, 

Nothing but love. 

—Selected. 

PRAYERS FOR VICTORY AND 
PEACE EVERY DAY AT NOON. 

The people of Washington, D. C, ob- 
serve 12 o'clock each day as a special 
time to offer prayers for victory and 
peace. A committee, so formed as to be 
representative -of all the people, without 
regard to religious denominations, creed, 
sect or race, promoted this observance, 
according to John G. Capers, chairman 
of the committee. 

The President has authorized the 
heads of all Government departments to 
sanction this observance through their 
chief clerks. The Secretary of War per- 
mitted a signal for the ringing of the 
bells to be fired from the top of an 
office building. The District Commis- 
sioners issued a statement giving their 
sanction to the observance. "This sanc- 
tion carried authorization through the 
Public Utilities Commission for the ob- 
servance of the movement by street cars 
and traffic, which stops on specified days 
during the time of prayer," said Mr. 
Capers. 

Posters similar to those of the Liberty 
Loan drives and the Red Cross cam- 
paigns have been made and will be hung 
in all churches, Sunday schools, clubs, 
hotel lobbies, banks and restaurants 
"Give a moment to God" is the sug- 
gestive phrase of the posters. These 
posters call the attention of the public 
to the necessity of prayer for the suc- 
cess of our allies and an enduring peace. 



AN UNUSUAL FUNERAL SERVICE. 

Fifty-three coffins were lowered into 
one grave at Woodlawn Cemetery, ad- 
joining Chicago, following the awful 
wreck of the circus train last June. The 
funeral services began when Rev. Johns- 
ton Myers, of the Emanuel Baptist 
Church, Chicago, a prominent Mason, 
offered a sermon. Rev. Dr. Myers gave 
way to Father William Cahill, of the St. 
Mary's Catholic Church, who performed 
the rites of his church. He was fol- 
lowed by Colonel F. J. Owens, Chaplain 
of the Showmen's League. The services 
were terminated by "six members of 
McKinley Chapter of the Eastern Star, 
who performed the funeral ritual of 
that organization." 



Human gullibility plus a feeble system 
of religious education makes fertile soil 
for all sorts of curious cults. 

Some schemes for securing human 
brotherhood are as mechanical as the 
cranking of a car. 

One of the cleverest devices of the 
Devil is the prompting of people to give 
religious reasons for irreligious acts. — 
The Congregationalist. 



"EAGLE'S WINGS." 

Joiners, cheer up ! There are more 
worlds to conquer in Secret Societydom. 
An address was given on the evening of 
June oth, iqi8, before the members of 
"The Eagle's Wings 11 in Washington, D. 
C. How suggestive is the name. Now 
let lodge architects and inventors get 
busy with the rituals of "The Owl's 
Eye," "The Bat's Beak," "The Hen's 
Scratch," et cetera. The colored breth- 
ren will have to wake up and get busy. 
The following names of theirs for 
lodges are getting to be an old story : 



98 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



"United Order of the Reformers," 
"Grand United Order of Galilean Fish- 
erman," "United Brothers of Friendship 
and Sisters of the Mysterionus Ten," 
"Grand Order of Wise Men and Wom- 
en," "United Order of Good Shepherds," 
"Royal Knights of King David," 
"Knights and Daughters of Tabor," "In- 
dependent Order of St. Luke," "Grand 
United Order of Brothers and Sisters," 
and "Sons and Daughters of Moses." 
One can almost believe that these are 
titles from Scotch Rite Masonry. 



The Yellow Jacket, published at 
Moravian Falls, North Carolina, and 
The Menace, of Aurora, Missouri, are 
especially opponents of Catholicism, 
but each of these papers seems to be 
equally concerned in booming Masonry. 
The Yellow Jacket publishes as its aim : 
"To swat liars and leeches, hypocrites 
and humbugs," and this is the way it 
does it in the September, 1917, issue, 
Vol. 22, No. 26: "This time the knock 
is administered (by Secretary Baker) to 
the oldest and grandest order on the 
face of the earth — one that was old 
when Jesus Christ walked among men 
and one of which if He was not a mem- 
ber, he most ardently embraced its 
teaching and taught its precepts — the 
Masonic Order." 



A POLYGAMOUS CHAPLAIN. 



Brigham H. Roberts, the notorious 
polygamist who a few years ago was 
deemed unfit to sit in the House of Rep- 
resentatives, is now, by appointment of 
the governor of Utah, serving as chap- 
lain in the United States Army at Camp 
Kearney in Southern California. It 
seems a tragedy that the man who was 
by the representatives of the country as 
a whole deemed morally unfit to sit with 
our national law-makers should, while 
continuing to live with as many wives as 
ever, be appointed by the governor of a 
state to the sacred office of chaplain in 
the army, to help mould the lives and 
shape the character of the country's 
youth. Is not the possibility of such an 
appointment a striking proof of the need 
of an amendment to our federal constitu- 
tion bringing Mormon polygamists under 
federal control ? 



THE MORGAN MONUMENT. 

REV. DAVID S. WARNER, 

EDITOR S. S. LITERATURE, FREE METHODIST 

CHURCH. 

It was recently my privilege to spend 
a short time in Batavia, New York. 
During my stay I made it a point to pay 
a visit to the Morgan Monument. I 




had passed the place many times on New 
York Central trains and had seen the 
monument, but this was my first visit to 
this historic shaft. 

The monument, which was erected 
through the efforts and contributions of 
many antimasons in memory of William 
Morgan, who was murdered by Masons 
in 1826 for publishing the secrets of the 
order, stands in the southwest corner of 
the Batavia cemetery in a sightly and 
beautiful spot. It stands solidly and 
presents a fine appearance, being well 
preserved. The grounds about it are 
well kept. The monument is a credit to 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



99 



the Cause which it represents and it 
stands as a protest against the secret 
lodge evil. 

I went to a store in the city where 
postcards were on sale to see if I could 
get views of the monument. They had 
none, but the clerk said they had photo- 
graphs of it, and I was able to secure 
one of the entire monument, and one of 
each of the four sides, showing clearly 
the several inscriptions. 



THE FACTS STATED. 

BY HON. THURLOW WEED 

on the 
Morgan Abduction, with his Affidavit. 
Illustrated, 16 pages and cover, 4^x 
6y 2 - Single copies five cents. Ten 
copies to one address twenty-five cents. 
Do your bit by giving each of your 
neighbor's boys a copy of this historic 
document. Address : National Chris- 
tian Association, 850 W. Madison St., 
Chicago, Illinois. 



UNION OFFICIALS AND WAITERS 

ARE ACCUSED OF DRUGGING 

NON-TIPPING PATRONS. 

Ten officials and waiters were indicted 
by the July grand jury yesterday in the 
investigation of waiters administering 
powders to non-tipping patrons of Chi- 
cago's fashionable hotels, clubs and res- 
taurants. 

Five Women Among Victims. 

Five women, the evidence before the 
grand jury disclosed, were made inno- 
cent victims of the powders in cases 
where the waiters sought to drive trade 
away after the managements under which 
+hey were employed refused to unionize. 
Manager a Victim. 

John Daugherty, manager of the Ken- 
wood Hotel, testified that he, too, was 
a victim. He explained to the grand 
jurors that demands had been made on 
him to hire only union waiters. He re- 
fused. 

Evidence of dynamiting and throwing 
of malodorous bombs also was intro- 
duced. So-called "stink bombs" were 
broken in the banquet hall in the Hotel 
La Salle shortly before the banquet in 
honor of Lord Northcliffe was sched- 
uled to begin last December. According 
to the testimony, this resulted after the 
management had refused to employ only 
union waiters for the banquet. 



Paul Grueble, head waiter of the Ho- 
tel Randolph (formerly the Bismarck), 
was one of the witnesses who related in- 
stances where dynamite bombs were set 
off. The hotel and the gardens were 
partly wrecked, he said. 

Thirteen Tell Stories. 

Among places where powders were ad- 
ministered, according to Prosecutor Mi- 
chels, were the Jackson Park Tavern, 
Hotels Sherman, La Salle and Morrison. 
Terrace Garden, Edelweiss Cafe, Univer- 
sity Club, Union League Club and Kuntz- 
Remmler Company. He named the Ho- 
tels Sherman, Morrison, the Green Mill 
Gardens and the Lambs' Cafe as other 
scenes of bomb warfare. 

Thirteen victims of the powders told 
their stories. Illness ensued in about ten 
minutes after a powder had been given. 

Dr. J. A. Wesener of the Columbus 
laboratories made a chemical analysis of 
the powders seized in the union head- 
quarters and in Wood's home and testi- 
fied they contained salts of antimony and 
potassium of tartrate, commonly known 
in medical circles as tartar emetic. 

He explained instances were known in 
which 6 17/100 grains had proved fatal. 
The powders used by the waiters con- 
tained ten grains, according to his analy- 
sis. — Chicago Herald and Examiner, 
July 9, 1918. 



METHODISTS ESTABLISH AN OR- 
PHANAGE IN FRANCE. 

Property for an orphanage in Greno- 
ble, France, requiring an expenditure 
of $35,000, has been purchased by the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, accord- 
ing to a statement of Mrs. William 
Fraser MacDowell, president of the so- 
ciety. Two women have been sent to 
France to care for this orphanage, where 
50 children will be accommodated this 
year. 

"The sum of $5,000 has been trans- 
mitted to North Africa for use in our 
mission there in the care of French or- 
phans," said Mrs. MacDowell. "The 
same amount has gone to Italy for the 
care of Italian children orphaned by 
the war. All our organizations have 
been greatly interested this year in 
sending supplies of clothing to France. 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



The cost o f the new material used in 
these supplies is placed at $9,120. It 
has been a joy to the society to be able 
to help a little in the cause which is 
stirring the hearts of the whole coun- 
try." 



THOUGHTS FROM NIAGARA FALLS. 

BY JAIMES E. PHILLIPS. 

A ten days' furlough was due me ac- 
cording to Army Y. M. C. A. rules, and 
in the providence of God I was able to 
spend it with my family. Those who 
have been away from their wife and lit- 
tle ones for six months for the first time 
in their married life, will be able to re- 
joice with me. 

This privilege was possible because of 
my being sent to New York City on 
"Y" business. On my way to Chicago I 
stopped off at Niagara Falls. 

If one expects to see something as 
high and as big as a mountain, he will 
be disappointed, but if you take the time 
to sit and watch the water take its down- 
ward plunge you will discover hidden 
beauty unnoticed at first. The water is 
never in a hurry, not even in falling. 
The dark green flood calmly smooth ap- 
proaches the brink, broken into white 
foam here and there where some hidden 
rock seems to try to warn it of the depths 
beyond. 

Immediately on going over the brink 
the battle is with the air and the placid 
water is changed into a white foaming 
cascade with only here and there a faint 
tinge of the green. But the contest is 
not over. The air vainly snatches at the 
leaping flood, curling the edges into thou- 
sands of dainty streamers pointing up- 
ward, as it tries to turn the flood back. 
But even here it fails, for the stream- 
ers, breaking into millions of pearl drops, 
gracefully disappear into the mist be- 
low. For exquisite beauty, for grace of 
movement, for a quiet but mighty dis- 
play of power, Niagara Falls is unsur- 
passed. 

As I sat watching this gem among the 
wonders of the world, I realized what 
a marvelously beautiful world God has 
placed us in ! The rapids above the 
Falls, where the rocks whip the water 
in whitened frenzy are beautiful. Even 
the wrecking of the water against the 
rocks is harmony When I looked at 



the Falls, it seemed like the last word 
in the sublimely beautiful. And then 
these words came to me : "Eye hath not 
seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it en- 
tered into the heart of man what things 
God hath prepared for them that love 
him." 

For 35,000 years, we are told, the 
flood of waters has been pouring over 
these rocks. A hundred or a thousand 
years from now they will be as they are 
today. To me it was a most impressive 
type of eternity. Without haste and 
without change these waters will con- 
tinue to flow through the centuries to 
come. And then the further thought 
came of Him who "is the same yester- 
day, today and forever." 

Chicago, July 8th, 1918. 



LIQUE FRANC CATHOLIQUE. 

W. I. Phillips, Secretary. 

Dear Sir: — In your annual report 
June, 1916 (C. C. June 1916 p. Jj) you 
said : "Our field is the United States, 
though it ought to be the world for there 
is only one N. C. A. while there is need 
for one in every land." 

I have sent to your address the Catho- 
lic Quebec French monthly paper "Le 
Croise" (The Crusader) of June instant 
printing, with approbation of Cardinal 
Begin (May 24, 1918) the program and 
statutes of the Anti-Masonic French 
Catholic Association of Canada, a truly 
National Christian one under the name : 
"Lique Franc Catholique." 

The "Lique Franc Catholique" is cen- 
tered in Quebec, three kinds of members : 
adherents, actives, benefactors, feminine 
and juvenile sections, local committees, 
provincial and central federal committee. 
Patron the Archangel Michael who van- 
quished Satan the anti-God. Micha-Eel 
(Hebrew), meaning "Who is like God?" 
Your Belgian Associate, 

L. Hacault. 



He that loves not lives not. — Raymond 
Lull. 



I have never read in the Scripture of 
God of such a place as purgatory, nor 
yet believe I there is anything that can 
purge the souls of men but the Blood of 
Jesus Christ. — Patrick Hamilton, Martyr. 



August. 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



101 



aioljtt (jpmttru Aimms — &txtf)$n> aibmt MnxUh States 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

To Edward Livingston, Esq. 

Washington, 10 April, 1833. 

Sir: In the National Intelligencer of 
the 226. of April, 1830, there appears an 
address, there said to have been deliv- 
ered by you, to the General Royal Arch 
Chapter of the United States, upon your 
installation to the high Masonic official 
dignity of their general grand high- 
priest. 

In that address, after a feeling and 
elegant acknowledgment of the grate- 
ful emotions which you experienced on 
being apprised of the unexpected and 
unsolicited distinction which had been 
conferred upon you by your election to 
that office, and a pathetic allusion to 
that period of life when all worldly 
honors fade into the "sear and yellow 
leaf," you assign as your reason for ac- 
cepting the dignity and the charge of 
presiding over an association in whose 
labors you had "for many years retired 
from any participation," that your re- 
fusal might have been "ascribed to an 
unmanly fear of encountering a clamor 
raised against our institution (of Free- 
masonry), or to a consciousness that the 
vile and absurd accusations against it 
were well founded. Either of these sus- 
picions (you added) would have in- 
jured not my character only, but that of 
the whole fraternity." 

You further assigned an additional 
motive for overcoming the reluctance 
suggested by the consciousness that your 
long retirement had rendered you less fit 
to fill than many others, equally well 
qualified in other respects ; and this mo- 
tive was your confidence in the Ma- 
sonic skill and excellent character of the 
worthy companion who was, at the 
same solemnity, installed with you as 
your deputy general grand high-priest 
After these ceremonial preliminaries, 
you proceed as follows : 



"Companions and Brethren: For the 
first time in the history of our country, 
persecution has raised itself against our 
honorable fraternity. It does not, indeed, 
as in other countries, incarcerate our 
bodies, strain them on the wheel, or con- 
sume them in the flames of the inquisi- 
tion ; but its attacks are, to an honorable 
mind, as unjustifiable. It assails our 
reputation with the blackest calumnies ; 
strives, by the most absurd inventions, to 
deprive us of the confidence of our fel- 
low-citizens ; belies the principles of our 
order, and represents us as bound to 
each other by obligations subversive to 
civil order, and hostile to religion." 

Mr. Livingston : In molding this per- 
sonified image of persecution, did it 
never occur to you that the foul and 
midnight hag, who justly bears that 
name, is never to herself more delicious- 
ly occupied than in charging persecution 
upon others? In those Holy Scriptures, 
which it is your official duty to read and 
expound to your companions and breth- 
ren of the Royal Arch, it is related, that 
when your predecessor in the high 
priesthood, Ananias, commanded that 
Paul should be smitten on the mouth, the 
apostle of the Gentiles turned upon him 
and said, "God shall smite thee, thou 
whited wall; for sittest thou to judge 
me after the law, and commandest me 
to be smitten contrary to the law?" I 
will not imitate this exclamation of Paul, 
for which he himself apologized when 
informed that it was the high-priest to 
whom he spoke ; but I will ask you, sir, 
to reconsider this charge of persecution, 
imputed by you in the face of the world 
not indeed to any individual by name but 
to a numerous and respectable class of 
your fellow-citizens in nine or ten states 
of the Union — to all that class of citi- 
zens known in the community by the 
denomination of Antimasons. I am one 
of them myself. As respects myself I 
know — as regards the whole party I 
firmly believe — that in the above pass- 
age of your address you did them great 
injustice. In charging them with cal- 
umny you calumniated them yourself. 



102 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



In accusing them of persecution, you are 
yourself. the persecutor. 

I will not say that on your part this 
persecution and calumny were willful. 
You had for many years retired from 
any participation in the labors of the 
craft. If this fact is not very pregnant 
of evidence, that, in your estimation, the 
labors of the craft were, when you par- 
ticipated in them, of a high order of 
public usefulness or private beneficence, 
it exculpates you at least from all par- 
ticipation in labors of evil. You did not 
know what new labors had, most espe- 
cially in your own native State of New 
York, and extensively elsewhere, been 
ingrafted upon the old stock. You did 
not know the additions which had been, 
in many lodges and chapters, made to 
the whole graduation of your oaths. The 
tree had not borne all its fruits. The 
Morgan tragedy had been enacted, and 
more than three years of impunity had, 
in evasion or defiance of the laws of 
nature, of justice, and of the land, shel- 
tered the guilt of its prepetrators ; but 
you did not know, nor was there mortal 
out of the pale of your penalties who did 
know, the catalogue of Masonic crimes 
which had been committed in affiliated 
connection with that Masonic murder ; — 
you know them not to this day. Multi- 
tudes of them are, and will ever remain, 
secreted under the seal of the fifth liba- 
tion, and under the obligation to conceal 
from every person under the canopy of 
heaven, the secrets of a worthy brother, 
— murder and treason not excepted, or 
excepted at the option of the swearer. 
More than a year after your address was 
delivered the grand lodge of Rhode 
Island published a defense of Masonry 
against those same charges which they, 
like you, pronounced persecutions and 
calumnies. Yet, even then, they said 
that whether Morgan had been murdered 
or not, they could not tell, for they kneiv 
nothing about it. They knew nothing 
about it ! They knew nothing about the 
facts proved in the judicial tribunals of 
New York, not only by clouds of wit- 
nesses, but by the confessions and pleas 
of guilty of several among the conspir- 
ators themselves. The grand lodge of 
Rhode Island, one and all, knew nothing 
about all this, and yet they published a 
defense of Masonry, and pronounced 



persecution and calumny, the denuncia- 
tions of virtuous indignation against 
those very judicially authenticated facts, 
about which they declared that they 
kneiv nothing. 




•*T.Hi mm of om civa. 

INSTITUTIONS IS TO BE T'0UND 

m MASONRY, ALREADY 

pOMEHflftAND DAILY SECOMIHS 

MORE SO." $05NET8yV 

country m exposure of 

iTS DANGERS'.' 



Capt,W m MORGAN, 




WEST SIDE MORGAN MONUMENT. 

Sir, your address to your Royal Arch 
companions had more of candor or more 
of discretion. You advised them that 
calumnies so absurd as those uttered 
against you (the Masons) were best met 
by dignified silence ! And yet you did 
not meet them by dignified silence ; you 
pronounced them from your exalted seat 
of general grand high-priest of the order, 
black and absurd calumnies, and you at- 
tributed them all to persecution. 

But if I am bound to acknowledge the 
candor and discretion of your advice to 
your brethren to meet the charges against 
their institution with dignified silence, I 
can not offer an equal tribute of com- 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



103 



mendation to your consistency, when 
after all your bitter complaints of cal- 
umny and persecution, you . urge them 
to "be just, and reflect how much cause 
for excitement has been given by the out- 
rageous abduction of a citizen dragged 
from his family and friends, in the midst 
of a populous state, followed up, most 
probably, by the perpetration of a most 
atrocious murder." 

You then remind them that "it was 
natural, from all the circumstances of 
this most extraordinary and savage act. 
to believe that it was committed by Ma- 
sons." 
Sir, Was It Not Committed By Masons? 

"It was in human nature, — unenlight- 
ened and prejudiced human nature, — to 
impute the cause of the offense to some 
secret tenet of the fraternity, and. to in- 
volve them in the criminality of their 
guilty members." 

Why the words unenlightened and 




SOUTH SIDE MORGAN MONUMENT. 



prejudiced? Was not some secret tenet 
of the fraternity the cause of the of- 
fense? That tenet of the fraternity, se- 
cret at the time of the murder of Mor- 
gan, is secret now no longer. For the 
mere intention to reveal it, Morgan paid 
the penalty of his Entered Apprentice's 
oath ; his book revealed it after his death. 
Its revelation was authenticated on the 
4th of July, 1828, by the testimony, not 
of unenlightened and prejudiced human 
nature, but of the Le Roy convention of 
seceding Masons, — men who themselves 
had taken these oaths, and declared 
themselves subject to the penalties which 
had been inflicted by Masonic hands up- 
on Morgan. 

"It was natural that ambitious men 
should keep up the excitement, and di- 
rect it against political adversaries for 
their own elevation." 

Perhaps it was. You, Mr. Livingston, 
are versed in the ways of ambition and 
ambitious men. You know their pro- 
pensity to keep up excitements, and to 
direct them against political adversaries 
for their own elevation. You must 
know, you can not but know, that Ma- 
sonry has been used by ambitious men 
for the same purposes. 

Political Preferment Promised. 

You must know that in many of the 
New York lodges the promise to promote 
a brother's political advancement was 
one of the recent additions to the Ma- 
sonic obligations. You may and ought 
to know that wherever the spirit of Anti- 
masonry has arisen, one of the first dis- 
coveries made by it has been that wher- 
ever a lodge or chapter has existed, at 
least three-fourths of all elective offices 
in the place were held by worthy breth- 
ren and companions of the craft, chosen 
by men, multitudes of whom knew not 
themselves the influence under which 
their votes were cast. You know, too, 
that the charge of ambitious and selfish 
motives is one of the most vulgar and 
most hackneyed imputations of all ambi- 
tious rivals and competitors against one 
another. In condescending to use it your- 
self against the Antimasons, you cer- 
tainly gave no additional dignity to it; 
and as a defense of the institution 
against Antimasonrv, you might with ad- 
vantage to yourself have remembered 
your advice to your brethren, and pre- 



104 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



ferred to such a shield, the armor of 
dignified silence. 

"And it was quite natural that men 
should be found simple enough not to see 
through their views, credulous enough to 
believe their absurd tales, or sufficiently 
unprincipled to propagate them, know- 
ing them to be false." 

This again may be true. Of simple, 
of credulous, and of unprincipled men, 
there are always numbers in every com- 
munity, and they are the natural instru- 
ments of politicians of more ambition 
than principle. But, in this respect, as 
in many others, Antimasonry is and has 
been more sinned against than sinning. 
Simple and credulous men have, for ex- 
ample, been told by the general grand 
high-priest of the General Royal Arch 
Chapter of the United States, that the 
charges against the Masonic institution 
of having had some secret tenet, which 
was the cause of the murder of Morgan, 
were black and absurd calumnies, in- 
vented by persecution, and which none 
but fools and cullies could believe, and 
none but knaves would propagate. Sim- 
ple and credulous men may believe these 
assertions of the general grand high- 
priest, because they are made by him, 
and because his character gives them the 
weight of authority. To simple and 
credulous men, the highest of all evi- 
dence is the authority of great names, 
and accordingly your own most plausible 
answer to the Antimasonic charges 
against your institution is an appeal to 
the great and good men who have be- 
longed and still belong to it. 

But, sir, this is not sound reasoning 
to influence the minds of other than sim- 
ple and credulous men. The question, 
permit me to say, upon the issue which 
I am about to take with you is not who 
— but what — not who have bound them- 
selves by the Masonic oaths, obligations, 
and penalties, but what these oaths, obli- 
gations, and penalties are. What is their 
nature and what have been their fruits? 

Now, sir, I do aver that "the cause 
of the offense" — that is the murder of 
William Morgan and of a multitude of 
other crimes indissolubly connected with 
it, — was a secret tenet of the fraternity 
— secret then but no longer secret now. 
It consisted in the obligation and penalty 
of the Entered Apprentices oath. It 



was the secret tenet of initiation to the 
Masonic institution. 

This, sir, is the issue which I, an Anti- 
mason, tender to you, the general grand 
high-priest of the General Royal Arch 
Chapter of the United States. I call 
upon you, sir, in that capacity, to sustain 
the charge of persecution and calumny 
made by you* in your address to your 
brethren and companions, upon your in- 
stallation, against the whole body of An- 
timasons in the United States, and to 
sustain the institution over which you 
preside, against the charges which you 
pronounce persecuting and calumnious. 

But this, sir, is not my whole or my 
ultimate purpose. I do conscientiously 
and sincerely believe that the order of 
Freemasonry, if not the greatest, is one 
of the greatest moral and political evils 
under which this Union is now laboring. 
I further believe that the primary and 
efficient cause of all this evil is that same 
rite of initiation; for as all the oaths, 
obligations, and penalties of the subse- 
quent degrees are but variations, expan- 
sions, and aggravations of that primitive 
vice, let that be once abolished and all 
the rest must fall with it ; knock away the 
underpinning, and the whole scaffolding 
must come to the ground. 

With this address, I have the honor of 
submitting to you a pamphlet containing 
four letters on the Entered Apprentice's 
oath. You will perceive, sir, that they 
arraign that act of initiation upon five 
distinct charges, as contrary to the laws 
of religion, to the laws of morality, to 
the laws of the land. 

Those letters have been now more than 
six months published. Their existence 
has not been noticed by any of the news- 
papers of the country under Masonic 
influence ; but they have been very ex- 
tensively circulated in pamphlets, and 
numerous editions of them have been is- 
sued in several of the states of the Un- 
ion. They have, of course, attracted 
much of that benevolence and charity, in 
the construction of motive, for which the 
Masonic order is so conspicuous, upon the 
head of their author, but no attempt has 
to my knowledge been made to answer 
them. They were first published in the 
Commercial Advertiser of New York, 
and addressed to its editor, Col. William 
L. Stone, known to you as a distinguished 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



105 



companion of your order in the degree 
of a Knight Templar. 

I have expected that some show of de- 
fense against the charges in those letters 
would have been made. The charges 
are grave, — they are specific, — they are 
made under the responsibility of my 
name. And now, sir, as no individual 
brother or companion of the craft has 
been willing to undertake its defense, I 
call upon you, as the general grand high- 
priest, of the order in these United States 
to undertake it. I call upon you the more 
freely, because, if the charges are true, 
there is a debt of justice and of repara- 
tion due from you to all the Antimasons 
of the United States. The charges are 
in part the same with those which you 
have pronounced absurd, calumnious, 
and persecuting. If, upon examination, 
you find them true, I expect from your 
candor an acknowledgement of your er- 
ror; from your magnanimity, a retrac- 
tion of your charges against the Anti- 
masons. 

I expect more. If, upon a fair exam- 
ination of these charges against the En- 
tered Apprentice's oath, obligation, and 
penalty, you should find yourself unable 
to defend them before the tribunal of 
public opinion ; if you should, by the nat- 
ural rectitude and intelligence of your 
enlightened and unprejudiced mind, 
come to the conclusion that the first ini- 
tiatory rite of Freemasonry is in its own 
nature vicious, immoral, and unlawful; 
that no mental reservation can excuse it ; 
that no explanation can change its na- 
ture ; that no plea of nullity can purify 
the attainder of its bloody purport ; then, 
sir, I expect that, as the general grand 
high-priest of the order, you will imme- 
diately advise its abolition, or at least 
recommend that it should never more be 
administered. I ask not merely of the 
grand high-priest of Masonry, but of the 
profound and eloquent and humane legis- 
lator of the criminal code for Louisiana ; 
I ask of him the abolition forever of that 
brutal penalty of death by torture and 
mutilation, for the disclosure of sense- 
less secrets ; or rather, now, of secrets 
proclaimed from every housetop of the 
land. I say to you, in the language of 
the Roman orator, in the sentiment of a 
heart congenial with your own : *"Hanc 
domesticam credudelitatem tollite ex 



civitate ; hanc pati nolite diutins in hac 
republica versari; quae non modo id habet 
in se mali, quod <ivem atrocissime sus- 
tulit, verum etiam honiinibus lenissimis 
ademit misericordiam. Nam cum omni- 
bus horis aliquid atrocitcr fieri videmus, 
ant audimus; etiam qui naiura mitissimi 
sumus, assiduitate molestiarum scnsum 
omnem humanitatis ex animis amitti- 
mus." 

I propose to address you upon this 
subject again. There is in the pamphlet 
herewith inclosed a fifth letter addressed 
to Benjamin Cowell, of Rhode Island, 
containing my opinion in favor, to a cer- 
tain extent of what has been called po- 
litical Antimasonry. As this principle 
has had, and must continue to have, a 
powerful influence upon the policy and 
upon the history of this Union, it will 
not be unworthy of your consideration in 
your other capacity of secretary of state 
of these United States. I shall endeavor 
to prove to your conviction that your ex- 
hortation to the brethren and compan- 
ions of your order throughout the Union, 
but under your jurisdiction, not to be 
tempted to the slightest interference in 
political parties, has been and must be 
unavailing and nugatory, that so long as 
you adhere to the administration of the 
Entered Apprentice's oath, your lodges 
and chapters must and will be political 
caucuses, and that Masonry will be the 
signal for political proscription to one 
party, as Antimasonry has been and will 
be to the other. 

I am, very respectfully, sir, 
Your fellow citizen, 

John Quincy Adams. 



*Banish from our borders, suffer no longer 
to prey upon our vitals this home-bred cruelty 
amone a people hitherto renowned for the 
merciful treatment of their foreign foes. Its 
greatest evil is not this most atrocious murder 
of a free citizen, but that it extinguishes the 
very sentiment of compassion in the mildest 
hearts. For when our eves and ears are 
hourly tortured with the sight and recital of 
deeds of horror, they cease even in the ten- 
derest natures to sympathize with human 
calamity, and the very sense of humanity is 
obliterated from our souls. 



Many ministers cut the throat of their 
sermons by the kind of a life they live. 
— Baxter. 



106 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



ELKS LODGE SUES FOR LIBEL. 

The head of the Trent Trust Com- 
pany, Richard H. Trent, and the editor 
of The Advertiser, R. O. Matheson, were 
tried in the Circuit Court, Honolulu, 
Hawaii, for criminal libel, by the Elks 
Lodge, Honolulu, and were fully exon- 
erated by the jury. 

The defendants charged the Elks 
lodge with selling liquor and turning out 
a few drunkards every year and contin- 
uing this work day and night, seven days 
in the week, at a time when our country 
was at war and when citizens generally 
were appealing to President Wilson to 
declare Honolulu dry during the war. 
When a protest was made in the lodge 
against this course the Elks voted two 
to one to retain their bar. When the 
government forbade the sale of liquors 
to enlisted men the jump in the sales of 
the Elk lodge indicated that they were 
disloyal. We do not wonder that Mr. 
Trent, the defendant, had said that 
''loyal young men would hesitate long be- 
fore joining such an Order." The fol- 
lowing account is taken from The Ad- 
vertiser, of Honolulu, Friday, April 
12th, 1918. — Editor. 



Richard H. Trent, head of the Trent 
Trust Company, who has been on trial 
in the Circuit Court before Judge Wil- 
liam H. Heen for the past week, was 
exonerated on the charge of criminal 
libel at eleven-thirty o'clock last night 
by the jury in the case after it had de- 
liberated eight hours. 

This brings to a conclusion the 
charges made against Trent and R. O. 
Matheson, editor of The Advertiser, in 
connection with one of a series of the so- 
called "Dixie Doolittle" articles, which 
the Elks lodge, complainants in the case, 
held was injurious to it as an order. 
Interest Widespread. 

The trial, which has been in progress 
for a week, attracted the widest atten- 
tion, due to the prominence of the de- 
fendant, who is head of the largest finan- 
cial institutions in the Territory and 
federal custodian of property owned by 
alien enemies. With R. O. Matheson, 
editor of The Advertiser, he was in- 
dicted for libel in connection with one 
of the series of so-called "Dixie Doo- 
little" articles, which the Elks lodge, 



complainants in the case, held was in- 
jurious to it as an order. 

When Attorney George Davis for the 
Elks opened his argument for the prose- 
cution he sought to impress upon the 
jury that the trial could not be regarded 
as a life and death affair. He charac- 
terized the cjiarge as a statutory mis- 
demeanor, intimating that in the event 
defendant were found guilty he could be 
let off with a small fine. 

In a part of his argument Attorney 
Davis himself said that the accused 
financier had only been over-zealous. 

"Trent is not a bad man," he asserted. 
"I am satisfied that he has a good heart 
and that he has noble traits. He was 
merely over-zealous." 

Attacks Defendant. 

Branching out from this point of view, 
he attacked the defendant sharptly for 
what had been said in the "Dixie. Doo- 
little" article of January 24. He asked 
why Trent had not written directly to 
the officers of the lodge over his own 
signature instead of having published 
the article over a pen name. He also 
said the defendant might have taken up 
the question of liquor sales in the Elks 
club with the minority of members whose 
effort to end liquor sales in the club had 
been defeated. 

All through his argument the attorney 
for the prosecution dwelt upon the defi- 
nitions of the terms used in the article. 
Chief among these were "John Barley- 
corn," "booze joint," and "joint." The 
attorney turned his guns early on the 
use by the defendant of a pen name, de- 
claring that an anonymous communica- 
tion was a deadly weapon. 
Watson Replies. 

Attorney E. M. Watson, representing 
the defendant, followed Attorney Davis 
and made reply to the things he charged 
He said that the "Dixie Doolittle" arti- 
cle did not carry the meaning that the 
prosecution had sought to show it held. 
He held that the defense had proven the 
truth of all the assertions contained in 
the article and had shown that it was 
fully justified by conditions in the com- 
munity at the time it was written. 
He asserted that the prosecution had en- 
deavored to read into the meaning of 
the article some hidden devilish meaning 
which it did not contain. 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



107 



Particular stress was laid by Attorney 
Watson in his reply to charges concern- 
ing the statement of the article which 
said the lodge was "turning out a few 
drunkards every year." 

Claims Charges True. 

Attorney Watson asserted that this 
was literally true, holding that any place 
where liquor is served necessarily turned 
out some "drunkards every year." Em- 
phasizing this point, he referred to the 
historic experiment of Bishop Potter in 
New York about ten years ago, when 
the Episcopal churchman had sought to 
provide a "workingman's club" where 
they could obtain pure liquor at reason- 
able prices. He pointed to the fact that 
this experiment had to be abandoned 
after a year. 

One after another he toook up the 
charges contained in the article, show- 
ing that all that had been said was true. 
He referred to the statement of the arti- 
cle which said "loyal young men would 
hesitate long before joining such an or- 
der," and contended this had been proved 
by the testimony of J. A. Balch of the 
Mutual Telephone Company, who said 
he had refused to join the Elks when 
asked because liquor was sold in the 
club rooms. 

Attorney Davis had objected to testi- 
mony along this line from General J. H. 
Soper, holding that General Soper, with 
his seventy-odd years, could not be re- 
garded as a loyal "young man." Attor- 
ney Watson held that Mr. J. A. Balch 
could properly be held to be a "young 
man." 

Loyalty Not Proven by Donations to Red 
Cross. 

Attorney Watson said that the loyalty 
of the lodge had in no way been brought 
into question, saying he believed within 
its membership were to be found some 
of the most loyal and patriotic citizens 
in the community. The attorney replied 
to the testimony that had been given con- 
cerning patriotic acts of the Elks lodge 
and the donations of the lodge to the 
Red Cross. He held that the lodge in 
this had done little more than its duty, 
saying that every loyal and patriotic citi- 
zen had made sacrifices to aid the Na- 
tion in the present crisis. The lodge had 
done only what all good citizens and 
loyal organizations had done, he said. 

Attorney Watson pointed to the fact 



that individual members of the Elks 
lodge themselves did not regard what 
had been written as injurious or defama- 
tory. In this connection he referred to 
the testimony of C. H. W. Norton and 
Olaf Sorenson, Elks, who had said they 
did not regard what had been written as 
libelous. 

Next he took up the point upon which 
the prosecution placed so much empha- 
sis, the definitions of terms Trent had 
used in writing the article. Particular- 
ly he referred to the word "joint," con- 
tending that it did not carry a harmful 
meaning, but was an ordinary slang 
phrase. 

"Come up to the joint and have some 
kaukau" was a commonplace invitation 
one might issue, he said, in illustration. 
Charge Is Serious. 

He was unwilling to permit the prose- 
cution to make light of the charge by 
calling it a statutory misdemeanor, and 
he pointed out to the jury that it was 
an offense that carried the penalty of 
imprisonment or fine or both imprison- 
ment and fine. Attorney Watson con- 
cluded his argument shortly after twelve 
o'clock, when an adjournment was 
taken until one-thirty o'clock in the aft- 
ernoon. 

Attorney John Cathcart entered the 
fray in the afternoon, reviewing first the 
specific charges contained in the indict- 
ment. He denied that the "Dixie Doo- 
little" articles could be regarded as li 
belous, saying the defendant had proved 
the truth of all the assertions he had 
made and had shown their publication 
had been entirely justified by the cir- 
cumstances. 

When Trent wrote the article, he said, 
Honolulu had not realized the serious- 
ness of the war. With leading institu- 
tions in the hands of German citizens, 
events .here were taking a course that 
might have led to disaster, and Mr. 
Trent, awake to the situation, had acted 
the part of a patriot in bringing sharply 
to the notice of the community the exist- 
ing condition. 

All Sought Prohibition. 

At that time he pointed out that all 
the leading organizations were taking 
unanimous action directed against the 
liquor traffic. All these organizations in 
appealing to the President to declare 



108 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



Honolulu dry, he said, were working 
along lines similar to those Mr. Trent 
was following when he wrote the article. 
Attorney Cathcart referred to a pre- 
ceding "Dixie Doolittle" article, one that 
had been published in The Advertiser on 
January 10, in which open letters had 
been addressed to the Elks lodge and to 
other clubs and organizations calling 
upon them in the hour of the Nation's 
need to give over the selling of liquor. 
The attorney pointed out that after Mr. 
Trent had written these appeals he had 
learned that the Elks had voted to re- 
tain their bar, and this justified the 
sharper and more emphatic article which 
had led to the libel charge. 

Reading parts of the article, he con- 
tended that everything that had been 
said, was wholly true. A "booze joint/' 
he contended, was a place where liquor 
was sold, nothing less, whether it was a 
saloon or a club room. He asserted that 
the statement of the article that the lodge 
had maintained a "benevolent interest in 
the booze business" was true, as shown 
by the fact members of the lodge had 
voted forty-two to twenty-one to retain 
the bar. John Barleycorn, he said, had 
figuratively been a member of the lodge 
for a long period. 

He had been on the job from seven- 
thirty o'clock in the morning until late 
at night, week days and Sunday, too, for 
many years, the attorney said. 
Other Points. 
Concerning the intimation of the arti- 
cle that "our army and navy officers 
must have a place to drink," he pointed 
out that this inference could not have 
been avoided when it was learned that 
the fight to retain liquor in the lodge had 
been led by an army officer. He empha- 
sized the point Attorney Watson had 
made, saying that any reasonable man 
knew that any place in the world where 
liquor was served to a number of in- 
dividuals necessarily turned out a "few 
drunkards every year." A certain pro- 
portion of any number of men who 
drank liquor, wherever it might be, would 
fall victims to it, he said. 

Lodge Liquor Sales. 

An elaborate table was presented by 

Attorney Cathcart showing that after 

the sale of liquor to soldiers had been 

stopped by law the sales in the Elks 



club had jumped measurably. The fol- 
lowing table, which the attorney read, 
shows receipts from liquor sales in the 
Elks club by months before the law be- 
came effective and after : 

1916. 1917. 

Before After 

Law. Law. Increase. 

June $1,088.80 $ 1,440.65 $ 351.85 

July .... 1,008.45 L423-35 4I4-90 

Aug 1,087.80 1,433-95 346.15 

Sept 1,215.20 1,35875 143*55 

Oct 1,137-00 1,567.75 430.75 

Nov 1,558.09 2,238.10 680.01 

Dec 1,834.88 2,292.60 457.72 



$8,930.22 $11,755.15 $2,824.93 

Before the law went into effect the 
average daily sales were $37.56. After 
the law became effective the average 
jumped to $46.25. The daily average on 
Sundays before the law became effective 
was $52.54, and after the law went into 
effect it jumped to $63.12. 

According to testimony given, the at- 
torney said the daily attendance at the 
club was between forty and fifty persons. 
Figuring the price of drinks at fifteen 
cents each, with an average attendance 
of fifty persons daily, an average of 302 
drinks a day were served, or six for each 
person, daily on week days and 421 
drinks, or eight and a half for each per- 
son, Sundays. 

Judge Heen defined the law of libel 
and delivered his instructions. Later the 
jury fully exonerated the defendants. 



Between the great things that we can- 
not do and the small things we will not 
do, the danger is that we shall do noth- 



ing. — Monod. 



No child of God should court the 
world's approbation. Certainly Luther 
did not. He pleased God and that was 
Spurge on. 



enough for him 



With God on our side a spider's web 
is like a wall of adamant, but with God 
against us. a wall of adamant is not bet- 
ter than a spider's web. — Selected. 



The way we walk in is strait and nar- 
row, and therefore not easy to our en- 
emy, the corrupt flesh.- — John Bradford. 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURK 



109 



THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH. 

BY J ENNIE L. IIARDII-:. 

CHAPTER IV. 
(Continued from June number.) 

During the second evening perfect or- 
der and quiet prevailed. Mr. Vallance 
and his party, with some others, were not 
present. A suggestion was made, at the 
saloon where they congregated, to use 
the "rotten-egg argument" in opposition 
to the propositions of the speaker, but 
this hint was not acted upon. Truth to 
tell, the party had left the church the 
previous evening before the close of the 
lecture to carry out such a project, but 
the eggs were not forthcoming, neither 
could any be found in the stores. With 
a dim apprehension that "that fool Dan 
Thompson" had outwitted him, Mr. Val- 
lance resolved to give himself no trouble 
about the second lecture, so beyond a 
visit enmasse to the precincts of the 
church, hallooing, shouting and throwing 
against the building an occasional stone 
or stick of cord wood, nothing further 
was attempted. And thus, strange as it 
may seem (and yet not strange, if we ac- 
cept Uncle Job's version of the matter, 
that "the Lord himself took charge of 
those two meetings"), in a hotbed of sec- 
retism the worship of Baal was decried 
and there was none to gainsay the warn- 
ing. 

Elder Kemp did not attend either 
meeting. He was visited by his brother 
in the ministry, who with earnest prayer 
and humble admonition endeavored to 
persuade him to exclusive fellowship 
with Christ and his church, but it was of 
no avail. The demon of the Lodge, that 
emissary of th,e Prince of Darkness, 
whispered to him the same falsehood 
breathed to one of old, "Thou shalt not 
surely die!" and, though he did not real- 
ize the fact, he had, in the language of 
Uncle Job, "backslid over it." 

I say he did not realize it ; in fact, he 
rather considered himself something of a 
martyr, and, after having received the 
condolments of his brethren in the lodge, 
and found his church pews filled with 
sympathizers, quite a good deal of a 
hero. 

A small room in the village accommo- 
dated the few who met together to wor- 
ship on the Sabbath following the lec- 



tures. Elder Lowly had consented to 
remain over that day and at the close of 
the "powerful meeting,'' during which 
several persons evinced their desire to 
become Christians, it was intimated that 
now was the propitious time in which to 
begin a series of gospel meetings, and ac- 
cordingly appointments for each evening 
of the week were made. 

It is not our purpose to follow the lit- 
tle band through this week of meetings 
nor through those that followed ; to de- 
tail how the little room was nightly filled 
with listener's, many of whom came actu- 
ated with a desire to know "what those 
few anti-masonic folks could do in the 
line of getting people converted'' ; and 
how Carrie and Debbie, Tom, Daniel and 
Mark Dee were the first fruits of that 
effort. Suffice it to say that through 
persecution and opposition of various 
kinds the work went steadily on in the 
hands of those who appropriated to 
themselves these words of the Most 
High, "Come out from among them and 
be ye separate and touch not the unclean 
thing, and I will receive you and will be 
a father unto you, and ye shall be my 
sons and daughters, saith the Lord Al- 
mighty." 

During the second week of this meet- 
ing a festival for the benefit of the Rev. 
Mr. Kemp engrossed the minds of a 
large number of the Lodgeville people. 
It was to be "a grand affair." The Ma- 
sonic hall was secured for the purpose 
and no pains spared to show that gen- 
tleman their appreciation of the course 
he had pursued. Is it to be wondered at 
that the festival in the course of the eve- 
ning became a regular dance, or that 
Elder Kemp felt himself utterly power- 
less to stem the tide? 

To this festival Carrie was invited by 
Mr. Vallance, but her answer was char- 
acteristic of herself: "Thank you, No. 
The fact of your being a Mason must be 
a barrier to future association between 
us. If what Elder Lowly says respect- 
ing Masonry is true, and father says it is, 
I advise you to have no more to do with 
it." His reply was a contemptuous curl 
of the lip, and later, in the saloon, where 
he met his companions, her name was 
bandied from mouth to mouth in coarse 
jest. 



no 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



Five years have passed. The old 
church still stands in Lodgeville, but 
another occupies the desk, for Elder 
Kemp, followed by the prayers of those 
faithful few who had once been his 
parishioners, found great unrest till to 
the "fountain of cleansing" he came to 
be healed, and severed the chains which 
bound him to all worship but that of the 
Triune God. His successor is a worldy 
man, proud of his talents and imputed 
popularity (for somehow he is not suf- 
ficiently appreciated at Lodgeville) while 
his church exhibits in "pomp and pride" 
what it lacks in spiritual power. 

The "little Anti-masonic church" has 
grown to one of huge proportions whose 
influence is felt far and wide. The few 
devotees of the lodge on surrendering its 
charter declared that it could not thrive 
in the midst of such a set of fanatics. 
The rum-seller moved his location, as 
he could make no money at Lodgeville, 
and, besides, serious objections in the 
form of votes were made to its further 
continuance. The billiard hall followed 
suit. Those to whom "tripping the light 
fantastic toe" is still a pastime are ob- 
liged to seek congenial spirits in another 
town. In short, the moral and religious 
aspect of Lodgeville is completely 
changed. 

The Thompson household numbers 
now but three persons. Mrs. Mark Dee 
and Mrs. Tom Rees often run home 
though to "see mother" and "help her a 
little." Mr. Trowley is as liberal as of 
yore and Daniel Thompson, who often 
laughs softly to himself when he thinks 
of the effect of his newspaper paragraph 
in bygone days, though he is a man of 
few words, can, so his' father says, 
preach the best private sermon he ever 
heard from the text, "Be ye not un- 
equally yoked together with unbeliev- 
ers." 

* THE END. 



Not in the clamor of the crowded street, 
Nor in the shouts and plaudits of the 

throng, 
But in ourselves, are triumph and defeat. 
— Longfellow. 




MASONIC CANDIDATE PREPARED FOR INITIATION. 



ALBERT G. MACKEY, 



Past General Grand High Priest. 

The question is not unfrequently 
asked : Are the works of Mackey on 
Masonry good authority in things ma- 
sonic? We therefore copy from an edi- 
torial in a masonic magazine, The New 
Ag£, the following sketch of his life 
and the estimate placed upon his services 
to the fraternity by Masons. — Editor. 



Pessimism paralyzes enthusiasm, and 
lamentations prevent enlistments. 



Dr. Albert Gallatin Mackey was a 
native of South Carolina as was his 
father, Dr. John Mackey. He was Sec- 
retary General of the Supreme Council 
of the Thirty-third Degree of the A. & 
A. Scottish Rite of Freemasonry from 
1844 to 1881. When the writer prepared 
the Memorial Book for the Supreme 
Council he printed the following brief 
sketch of Dr. Mackey, which because of 
its brevity he now reprints. Dr. Mackey, 
who for thirty-seven years was Secretary 
General of the Supreme Council, was 
born in Charleston, South . Carolina, 
March 12, 1807. When seventeen years 
of age he was appointed a teacher in 
the public schools of St. Johns, a place 
near Charleston, and while teaching he 
studied medicine, was admitted to the 
South Carolina Medical College, and was 
graduated in 1832, his Latin Thesis ob- 
taining the first prize. Some years after- 
wards he became Demonstrator of An- 
atomy in the college from which he had 
been graduated. He gave up the prac- 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



111 



tice of medicine in 1842 and afterwards 
devoted himself to literature and Ma- 
sonry, becoming a frequent contributor 
to the newspapers, magazines and jour- 
nals of the day. 

He was made a Mason in 1841 and was 
elected Grand Secretary of the Grand 
Lodge of South Carolina in 1843 and 
Grand Lecturer in 1845, holding these 
offices until 1866. He was elected Grand, 
High Priest of the Grand Chapter in 
1854, and re-elected every year continu- 
ously until 1867. The office of Grand 
High Priest of the General Grand Chap- 
ter of the United States was filled by 
him in 1859. The Thirty-third degree 
was conferred on him in 1844 an d he was 
then elected Secretary General, holding 
the place until his death. Dr. Mackey's 
first book on Masonry was the "Lexi- 
con," which was published in 1845. Then 
appeared in succession "The Mystic Tie," 
"Ahiman Rezon," "Principles of Masonic 
Law," "Book of the Chapter," "Text 
Book on Masonic Jurisprudence," "His- 
tory of Masonry in South Carolina," 
"Manual of the Lodge," "Crytic Ma- 
sonry," "Symbolism of Freemasonry," 
"Encyclopedia of Free Masonry" and 
"Manual of Parliamentary Law." These 
works made the name of the author 
famous and they are still in use through- 
out the United States by many of the 
various bodies of the Fraternity. 

Dr. Mackey died at Fortress Monroe 
June 20, 1881. The Supreme Council in 
recognition of his great services to it and 
to Masonry erected a tablet to his mem- 
ory in the Cemetery at Washington, 
D. C. — The New Age (Masonic Maga- 
zine) September, 19 10. 



A. F. & A. M. 
Newton Lodge No. 142. 
Newton, Kansas, Nov. 28, 1917. 
Mr. Leon B. Mayer, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Dear Sir and Brother: — Your letter of 
the 27th addressed to the Worshipful 
Master has been handed to me for 
answer, and in reply thereto will say that 
Mackey's works are considered a very 
high authority on things Masonic. * * * * 
Fraternally yours, 

(Signed)'R. A. Cook, 

Senior Warden, 
Newton Lodge No. 142, A. F. & A. M. 



WHY I AM NOT A FREEMASON. 
BY HERMAN NEWMARK. 

BROTHERHOOD was what allured 
me, a Jew, into Freemasonry at the end 
of the year 1914. The European War 
had shattered my fondest hopes of see- 
ing a universal brotherhood, and I fled to 
the lodge, hoping to find there that race 
and color prejudices were sunk in one 
common brotherhood of ALL men. I 
did not dream then, of what I know 
now by experience, that there CANNOT 
be any real brotherhood unless based 
upon the Fatherhood of God, and the 
Saviorhood of His Son, Jesus Christ, and 
thank God this brotherhood is a reality 
to me now. 

On entering into Freemasonry, I wa^ 
told that there were religious ceremonies 
in the lodge, but that as the NAME OF 
JESUS CHRIST WAS NEVER MEN- 
TIONED IN THE LODGE, I need 
have no scruples. This explanation sat- 
isfied me, and I went through the three 
DEGREES. 

One condition of Freemasonry — and 
other such secret societies — is that you 
must believe in God ; but who or what is 
meant by "God" DOES NOT MAT- 
TER AT ALL. Suppose my god is the 
sun, and my fellow-mason's god is the 
moon, and someone else worships a block 
of stone, or his ancestors, or any thing or 
person he chooses to call his god, THEN 
HE IS A FIT PERSON FOR THE 
MASONIC LODGE, for all races and 
religions and creeds may meet here to 
worship their own gods without anyone 
interfering with them, so Ion? as they 
agree on one common WORD "God." 
I was an infidel when I joined the lodge, 
being a JEW IN NAME ONLY, as 
are multitudes of others today. In 
white men's lodges the Bible is used, but 
in colored men's lodges thev have other 
sacred books according to their nominal 
beliefs. One thing is made sure of. 
though, and that is that the name of 
God's Son, Jesus Christ, is never spoken 
in the lodge — in case a Buddhist, Jew, 
Parsee, Infidel, etc., is offended! Usual- 
ly ordained clergymen are prevailed upon 
to lead the religious exercises, but THEY 
ARE ADVISED BEFOREHAND 
NOT TO USE THE NAME OF 
JESUS IN THEIR PRAYERS! So 



112 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



when a Christian attends the secret 
lodge (Freemason or otherwise) he not 
only does things in secret from his fam- 
ily and friends, but His Lord and Master 
Jesus Christ must be left outside the 
door, too, while he engages in worship 
with infidels, nominal Christians, Jews, 
heathen, etc. Yet GOD (THE ONLY 
TRUE AND LIVING GOD) SAYS: 
"Be ye not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers : for what fellowship 
hath righteousness with unrighteousness? 
And what communion hath light with 
darkness? And what concord hath 
Christ with Belial? Or what part hath 
he that believeth with an infidel? And 
what agreement hath the temple of God 
with idols? For ye are the temple of 
the living God ; as God hath said, T will 
dwell in them, and walk in them ; and I 
will be their God, and they shall be my 
people. Wherefore come out from 
among them, and be ye separate,' saith 
the Lord, 'and touch not the unclean 
thing; and I will receive you, and I will 
be a father unto you, and ye shall be my 
sons and daughters,' saith the Lord Al- 
mighty." — 2 Corinthians 6:14-18. 

CHRISTIAN BRETHREN, have 
you any excuse for remaining in the 
lodge? 

Brothers in Christ, have you any rea- 
son for joining the lodge? 

Does not Christ satisfy you? Is He 
not All-Sufficient ? Must you have fel- 
lowship with unbelievers, and worship 
in a heathen temple? For where Christ 
— the Light of the World — is expelled, 
there is only darkness left ; the darkness 
of sin, unbelief, heathendom, hell. 

Christian brother, in the name of 
Jesus, I ask you to come out and be sepa- 
rate. Show to all the world that Jesus 
is enough, that you can only worship 
GOD through the all-prevailing name of 
Jesus, and with HIS brothers and sis- 
ters (Mark 3:35), where Jesus, the 
Savior of men, is not only exalted but is 
SUPREME. 

Why did I leave the lodge? Because 
I fell in love with Jesus Christ and gave 
Him my heart, and where His name is 
not mentioned is no place for me. The 
Gospel is for ALL the POOR, the 
HALT, the MAIMED and the BLIND. 
The lodge is for the HEALTHY AND 



WEALTHY FEW. The lodge encour- 
ages one to believe he can be saved by 
works, and is in DIRECT OPPOSI- 
TION TO THE GOSPEL OF JESUS 
CHRIST ; for we KNOW that SALVA- 
TION IS BY THE GRACE OF 
GOD, THROUGH THE PRECIOUS 
BLOOD OF JFSUS, SHED ON THE 
CROSS FOR ALL. 

Is anyone afraid to leave the lodge be- 
cause of his oaths? Then listen to what 
God says to you in His Word: 

"Swear not at all." — Matthew 5 :34. 

"LET GOD be true, and every MAN 
a liar." — Romans 3 -.4. 

"If any man sin we have an Advo- 
cate with the Father, Jesus Christ the 
righteous ; and He is the propitiation for 
our sins. . . . And hereby we do know 
that we know Him, IF WE KEEP HIS 
COMMANDMENTS. He that SAITH 
T know Him' and KEEPETH NOT 
HIS COMMANDMENTS, is a liar, 
and the truth is not in him." — 1 John 
2:1-4. 

"If we confess our sins, He is faith- 
ful and just to forgive us our sins and 
CLEANSE US FROM ALL UN- 
RIGHTEOUSNESS."—: John 1:9. 

"Against THEE, Thee only have I 
sinned, and done this evil in Thy sight. 
... I acknowledge my transgressions. 
. . . Wash me thoroughly from mine 
iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin. 
Restore unto me THE TOY OF THY 
SALVATION. . . . THEN will I teach 
transgressors Thy ways, and sinners 
shall be converted unto Thee." — 
Psalm 51. 

"They saw no MAN anv more, save 
JESUS ONLY."— Mark 9:8. 

Brethren, in these LAST DAYS, so 
near to our dear Lord's return, let us 
AWAKE- OUT OF SLEEP and cast 
off the works of darkness, and WASH 
OUR ROBES WHITE IN THE 
BLOOD OF THE LAMB, so that we 
may not be ashamed before Him at His 
coming. 

Kobe, Japan, May 4th, 19 18. 



It is better to go with a few to heaven 
than with a multitude to hell, and be 
damned for the sake of company. — Dr. 
Parr. 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



113 



THE LATE REV. B. F. HESTER. 

"In Memory of Father." 
On Monday, March nth, 1918, the 
Rev. Benjamin Franklin Hester, of Burr 
Oak, Kansas, peacefully and quietly 
breathed his last at the close of a short, 
though not severe illness of five days. 
He was sixty-three years, eleven months, 
and five days old and had experienced 
hut a few days of illness during his whole 
life. 




BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HESTER. 

The near relatives left behind are the 
wife, formerly Miss Marie Frances 
Hicks of Danville, Knox County, Ohio, 
and six children : Harold Hester, Pro- 
fessor of History and Philosophy in 
Houghton College, Houghton, New 
York; Mrs. Ethel (Hester) Hansen of 
Seneca, Nebraska ; C. Floyd Hester, Pro- 
fessor of History and Economics in the 
City High School, Chippewa Falls, Wis- 
consin ; Mrs. Edna (Hester) Kaufmann 
of Akron, Ohio ; John E. and W. Orange 
Hester at home. 

"Father Hester," as he was called by 
his neighbors in later years, had been a 
Prohibition Party worker and voter ever 
since his conversion at the age of twenty 
in Shelby County, Indiana. Here he 
was born and raised on his father's 



farm near Manilla, Indiana. He was the 
first of the family to begin the Christian 
life and was instrumental in turning his 
parents and brothers Godward and Hea- 
venward. He prepared for the ministry 
at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, 
at the United Brethren College at Harts- 
ville, Indiana, and at the Wesleyan 
Methodist Seminary at Houghton, New 
York. He served Wesleyan Methodist 
pastorates for twenty-five years in the 
states of Ohio, New York, Indiana, Iowa 
and Kansas. 

The children all point to their father 
as the source of their interest in the 
Prohibition cause. So long as any of 
them can remember, a Prohibition Party 
paper has been a weekly visitor to the 
home. 

The work of the National Christian 
Association represented another reform 
issue which aroused Father to action, as 
well as the liquor problem. The official 
organ, "The Christian Cynosure" has 
been in his home for over 40 years. He 
first became interested in the Anti-secret 
work at Wheaton, 111. In his Auto-bi- 
ography written last winter, he has stat- 
ed : "Soon after my conversion at the 
age of 20, I felt called to preach. The 
Savior said to me by His Spirit : 'Get 
more schooling.' So I soon said good- 
by to precious father and ' mother and 
loved brothers and sister, and was away 
off to Wheaton College, 111., where the 
Secret Lodge menace was barred out 
and Jesus Christ honored. The great 
Jonathan Blanchard was then president 
(his noble son Charles now fills the 
chair). Father Blanchard was one of 
the finest preachers I ever heard and one 
of the most able lecturers against the 
secret lodge evils in the world, and 3 
better spirited and kinder hearted man I 
never met. I studied one year here and 
then one year at Hartsville, Ind., a United 
Brethren College where the Secret Lodge 
was kept out." 

Since the Wesleyan Methodist Church 
of which he. and his family were mem- 
bers, forbids lodge membership, the Anti- 
Secrecy Question has received more at- 
tention in his sermons and work than 
would be the case with pastors in many 
Other churches. He gave freely to the 
Anti-Secret work, gave lectures on the 



114 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



question, circulated literature, purchased 
books on the subject for himself and 
children to read, entertained anti-secret 
workers, and by private discussions on 
the secrecy question, caused many lodge 
members to see the folly of their way. 
His children are all interested in the 
anti-secret movement and gave much at- 
tention to the study of the question when 
in school at Houghton, N. Y., for, five of 
the six children have received at least 
a part of their education at Houghton 
College and the youngest one will likely 
do so sometime in the future. 

Father Hester was a man of wide 
vision, good judgment, clear reasoning 
powers, and always held the interest and 
attention of his audience, whether in the 
pulpit or on the public platform. 

His many personal friends and ac- 
quaintances on the various fields of labor 
in the states named above, his co-laborers 
in Kansas and other states, will regret 
to learn of his "departure never to re- 
turn," but all will say that the world has 
been made better because he has lived. 
He has left behind a legacy in good 
deeds, philanthropy, christian character, 
devotion to righteousness and to every 
important reform. 

C. Floyd Hester. 



Just in the proportion in which we be- 
lieve that God will do just what He has 
said is our faith strong or weak. Faith 
has nothing to do with feelings or with 
impressions. If we desire to couple 
them with faith, then we are no longer 
resting on the Word of God, because 
faith needs nothing of the kind. — Geo. 
Midler. 



SUSTAINING THE SOLDIERS. 

The man or woman in Christian serv- 
ice at home or abroad, is as truly a sol- 
dier as any who have "gone across" to 
fight for world democracy. The Chris- 
tian soldier is in a war greater in dura- 
tion, in forces involved, and in moment- 
ous consequences, than the one now rag- 
ing in Europe. It is as vitally important 
to sustain the Christian soldiers in the 
present stress and not only do as well 
as we have done in the past for the salva- 
tion of men and for the hastening of the 
kingdom of Christ, and in opposition to 



the Lodge and every other undemocratic 
and satanic movement, but to do better 
and more. One reason is that a time 
of war is always a time for sins and evils 
greatest successes. Gambling, profanity 
and lodgery will flourish during this war 
as never before. A publisher of lodge 
exposures in Chicago says, that it seems 
as though every soldier was being per- 
suaded to join one or more secret socie- 
ties and that there was never such a de- 
mand for secret society rituals as there 
is to-day. The lodges are booming 
throughout the country and leavening 
the army. 

What are you going to do about it? 
The answer is, we must redouble our ef- 
forts to distribute literature in our own 
communities and sustain the National 
Christian Association and its organ the 
Christian Cynosure. We must de- 
termine to reach a larger constituency. 
Not less, but more must be our motto. 

Those who know but little about mod- 
ern baalism and the spiritual devastation 
caused by it will not support the N. C. A. 
Those who have little conception of the 
influence in leading young men into lodge 
fellowship of the Modern Ministers or 
Prophets of Baal will not aid the N. C. 
A. in warning and saving our soldier 
boys and others and hence ought not you 
who are enlightened do more, not less, 
than ever before? Our brave men are 
giving their lives in splendid sacrifice on 
the battle front for the temporal wel- 
fare of the world. Shall we be unwilling 
to do as much for its spiritual welfare? 
Shall we hesitate at any sacrifice? Where 
war abounds sin much more abounds ! 
Let us resist the sins of our times with 
redoubled vigor. "You have not yet re- 
sisted unto blood, striving against sin." 
(Heb. 12:4). 

We do thank God for his friends who 
have so patiently, faithfully, and gener- 
ously sustained the N. C. A. and are now 
its backbone. But we must ask them to 
make still greater sacrifice this coming 
year. 

"Endure hardness as a good soldier of 
Jesus Christ" (II Tim. 2:3). "The bat- 
tle is not your's, but God's." (II Chron. 
20:15). "Who is this King of Glory? 
The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord 
Mighty in battle." (Psa. 24:8). 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



115 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Christian Reformed Churches : 

Volga, South Dakota $2370 

Carnes, Iowa 10.72 

S. Dekker, Classis Treasurer.... 17.00 
Eastern Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 50.00 
Neland Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 7.40 
S. Dekkar, Classis Treasurer.... 49.73 

Zeeland, III., Zeeland, Mich 1.70 

Franklin St., Grand Rapids, Mich. 23.43 

Hope Ave., Passaic, N. J 12.02 

II Muskegon, Mich 15.00 

Prosper, Mich., Ladies Aid 5.00 

1st Fremont, Mich 14.51 

Atwood, Mich 6.70 

Kalamazoo, N. W., Mich 11.22 

Goshen, Ind 2.10 

Hanford, California 10.00 

Denver, Colorado 2Q-57 

Mrs. S. E. Baily, 25c ; Miss Eliza F. 
Potter, 75c; Adolf P. Ebert, John Wyn- 
berg, Rev. S. L. Livingston, Frank Mc- 
Laughlin, and Rev. F. T. Stevenson, $1 
each; Rev. Wm. Harder, $1.50; Mrs. 
Hedda Worcester, Paul F. Graybill, Rev. 
A. H. Brat, Mrs. Philomela T. Wood- 
ward, and George W. Bond, each $2 ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ebeling and John 
Purdy, $3 each ; Mrs. Lizzie Woods Rob- 
erson, $4; Edgar T. Darlington, Mrs. 
M. C. McKee, and Mrs. Jas. E. Phil- 
lips, $5 each ; Mrs. C. Coe Shaw in mem- 
ory of her mother, $9; Mrs. C. Hille- 
gonds, M. W. Siemiller and sisters, and 
William Leon Brown, $10 each. Offer- 
ing at Annual Meeting $13. W. I. Phil- 
lips, $15. 



hands, or that they should ever revert to 
German ownership. German commerce 
has been shown to have been so in- 
dissolubly bound up with and so much 
a part of German militarism, that it is 
just and right that it should suffer all 
the penalties of war. 



THE GERMAN DOCKS. 

The taking over by the United States 
of the title and possession of the docks, 
piers, wharves and other shipping prop- 
erty on the Hudson River, owned by 
the German steamship companies, the 
North German Lloyd and the Ham- 
burg corporations, is greeted with uni- 
versal approval by the American people. 
The property is to be retained by the 
Government and not turned back to its 
former owners at the close of the war. 

Purchasers of Liberty Loan Bonds and 
War Savings Stamps, who supply the 
money used for this purpose, may feel es- 
pecial gratification. These docks and piers 
and wharves are strategic points of great 
importance and value, and it is intolera- 
ble that they should remain in enemy 



"CAN A FREEMASON BE A CHRIS- 
TIAN?" 

BY A METHODIST PASTOR, 
REV. L. O. TRUTH. 

The assertion is frequently made by 
Freemasons, that a man can not be a true 
Mason without being a Christian. But 
upon a fair and impartial investigation 
of all the facts implied in the statement, 
an honest, intelligent thinker doubts the 
possibility of a man being a Christian at 
all so long as he holds fellowship with 
the Masonic fraternity. 

If being a Freemason implies being a 
Christian the two institutions (Free- 
masonry and Christianity) must neces- 
sarily hold in common the same funda- 
mental principles. But if they do not 
embrace the same fundamentals the as- 
sertion is groundless and, of course, un- 
true. 

Christianity is a system of doctrine 
and precepts taught by Christ which are 
so essentially necessary, to the making of 
a Christian, that Christianity is an utter 
impossibility without them. 

If it can be shown that the life prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry are out of har- 
mony with, and antagonistic to, the life 
principles of Christianity it is apparent 
that Freemasonry not only does not hold 
the essential principles of Christ and 
does not promote Christianity but de- 
stroys it. The whole question must be 
determined by a comparison of the 
fundamental principles underlying the 
two institutions and man's relation to 
these principles. 

"Truth." 

Truth takes its place at the very 
foundation of Christianity and is so vi- 
tally related to Christianity that it can- 
not exist without it. In this presenta- 
tion of Christianity, as compared to Juda- 
ism, St. Paul offers truth as the first 
principle. He says, "Whatsoever things 
are true." (Phil., 4:8.) James says: 
"Brethren, if any of you do err from the 
truth and one convert him, let him now 



116 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 




PLAYING DISTRESS OVER BODY OF HIRAM ABIFF. 



know that he which converteth a sinner 
from the error of his way shall save a 
soul from death and shall hide a multi- 
tude of sins." (James, 5:19-20.) From 
these two Scriptural quotations, and 
especially from the one in James, it is 
shown beyond question that to be with- 
out truth is to be without God. Chris- 
tianity lives as the result of embodying 
and promoting truth. 

The very opposite is true of Freema- 
sonry. Freemasonry lives as the result 
of embodying and propagating falsehood. 
Landmark 24, as laid down in the Ma- 
sonic Constitution, contains the follow- 
ing paragraph : 'The temple of Solo- 
mon was the cradle of the institution, 
and, therefore, the reference to the op- 
erative masonry which constructed that 
magnificent edifice to the materials and 
implements which were employed in its 
construction and the artists who were en- 
gaged in the building are all component 
and essential parts of Freemasonry 
which could not be subtracted from it 
without an entire destruction of the 
whole identity of the craft." The above 
official statement, from the Masonic 
Constitution shows that Freemasonry 
must be able to identify itself with the 
building of Solomon's temple or lose its 
right, to exist, as a legitimate institution 
and become a false pretender before the 
mind of the public. 

The real historical facts show that 
Solpmon never heard of such an institu- 
ti6n as Freemasonry. All who are capa- 
ble of discerning between truth and 
falsehood know that Freemasonry has 






no relation to the building of Solomon's 
temple whatsoever. If Freemasonry 
made such claims as a working basis only 
with a definite understanding that the 
claims are purely fictitious the matter 
might be passed over as an error of small 
magnitude, but since the claim is offi- 
cially made and the very life of the craft 
depends upon the establishment of the 
claim, it becomes a falsehood of the 
gravest character, provided, however, the 
craft is unable to substantiate the claim, 
and this it can not do. 

In an effort to identify Freemasonry 
with the building of the temple at 
Jerusalem the Masonic craft undertakes 
to show that a secret fraternal organiza- 
tion was established, at the beginning of 
the building of the temple, with Solo- 
mon, Hiram, king of Tyre, and Hiram 
Abiff as charter members. These three 
were the Masters with a large force of 
apprentices and fellowcrafts under their 
supervision — Hiram Abiff being the 
chief workman. The claims are either 
true or they are untrue. If they are true 
Freemasonry has a perfect right to con- 
tend for identity with the building of 
Solomon's temple. But if they are false, 
Freemasonry has no right to make such 
claims, and to make them in the face of 
the facts, is the height of presumption. 
Such an institution as Freemasonry did 
not exist at the time Solomon built the 
temple, at Jerusalem, neither was such 
an institution possible at that time, first: 
because there is no record that Solomon 
and Hiram of Tyre had any but distant 
intercourse during the prepara- 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



117 



tion for and the building of the temple. 
Secondly : because no such man as Hiram 
Abiff is known in history. Thirdly : be- 
cause history shows conclusively that the 
negotiations, between Solomon and Hi- 
ram of Tyre were purely diplomatic and 
by messengers. 

When Solomon came to the throne of 
his father, David, Hiram king of Tyre 
sent greetings by the hands of messen- 
gers and in Solomon's response to Hi- 
ram, through the messengers, he made 
Hiram a proposition requesting him to 
furnish prepared timbers from his for- 
ests for the temple and he would pay for 
both materials and labor. A contract 
was made and complied with by both 
kings. "So Hiram gave Solomon cedar 
trees and fir trees according to all his de- 
sire and Solomon gave Hiram twenty 
thousand measures of wheat, for food 
to his household, and twenty thousand 
measures of pure oil ; thus did Solomon 
to Hiram year by year." (i Kings, 
5:10-11.) 

There isn't one word in the entire his- 
tory of Solomon and Hiram's relations 
to indicate a secret fraternity. But on 
the other hand there are abundant proofs 
that such relations did not exist. In vol- 
ume I on page 326, of the "Universal 
History of the World," the relation of 
Solomon and Hiram of Tyre is denned 
in these words : "Hiram was a great 
friend to the illustrious Hebrew mon- 
archs, David and Solomon, with both 
of whom he entered into commercial al- 
liances." The ancient origin of Freema- 
sonry is a false assumption which origi- 
nated in hell and is being promoted by 
the Devil through his agents for the sole 
purpose of defeating the truth and de- 
ceiving man. 

The Standard Encyclopedia says : 
"Fable and imagination have traced 
back the origin of Freemasonry to the 
Knights Templar, the Old Roman Em- 
pire, the Pharaohs, Hiram of Tyre, the 
temple of Solomon, or even to the time 
of the tower of Babel, or the ark of 
Noah. The Masonic craft- in reality is 
a product of the middle ages." 

The New International Encyclopedia 
says of Freemasonry : "A secret fra- 
ternal organization credited by enthusi- 
astic writers with great antiquity. The 
order, however, is now conceded to have 



been instituted about the first of the 
eighteenth century. The pretensions 
put forth to a date coevil with the build- 
ing of the temple at Jerusalem, with 
Solomon as its first Grand Master being 
considered, by those who have thor- 
oughly investigated the subject, as not 
worthy of credit." 

The Encyclopedia Britannica says : 
"Freemasonry is an institution not older 
than the beginning of the eighteenth 
century." 

These statements are from unques- 
tioned authority and are in perfect ac- 
cord with every unbiased author who 
has written on the subject. With these 
facts before an intelligent public it can 
be nothing less than gross presumption 
upon the part of Freemasonry to claim 
identity with the building of the temple 
at Jerusalem. There is just as much 
truth in the Mormon's claim to divine 
authority for the practice of polygamy 
as there is in the Masonic claim to be- 
ing cradled in Solomon's temple. 

When Freemasonry asks the public 
to accept its claims to antiquity it is 
equivalent to asking the public to close 
its eyes to all intelligence and conform 
to a blatant falsehood upon the assump- 
tion of traditional superstition without 
a single historical utterance to justify 
the claim. 

If a man can be a Christian and at the 
same time be a Freemason, he can be a 
Christian and at the same time a liar ; 
and if a man can be a Christian and a 
liar at the same time there will be a 
lot of Christians in hell. Prophecy 
says: "Because ye have said we have 
made lies our refuge and under false- 
hood have we hid ourselves. . . . There- 
fore thus saith the Lord God, judgment 
will I lay to the line and righteousness 
to the plummet, and the hail shall sweep 
away the refuge of lies and the waters 
shall overflow the hiding place." (Isa. 
28:15-17.) John says: "The fearful 
and unbelieving, and the abominable, 
and murderers, and whoremongers, and 
the sorcerers and idolators, and all liars 
shall have their part in the lake which 
burns with fire and brimstone ; which is 
the second death." (Rev. 21 :8.) As 
John tells us again in the 27th verse 
that, "There shall in nowise enter into 
the holy city anything that defileth 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



neither whatsoever worketh abomina- 
tion, or maketh a lie." In the face of 
these Scriptures can it be concluded that 
a true Mason, who lives in harmony with 
the official fundamental principles of his 
lodge, can be a Christian? He is not a 
true Mason who does not accept and 
conform his life to all the teachings of 
the order. Freemasonry says officially 
that Solomon's temple was the cradle of 
the institution, but an intelligent investi- 
gation proves that the statement is false. 
Can a man be a Christian who constitutes 
a part of the institution which has for 
one of its fundamental principles a lie? 
The Bible. 
Christianity adheres uncompromising- 
ly to the divine authenticity of the Bible 
and believes, with St. Paul, that "All 
scripture is given by inspiration of God." 
Freemasonry recognizes the Old Testa- 
ment under some circumstances to the 
exclusion of the New, and denies the in- 
spiration of both. 

Landmark 21 contains the following 
paragraph : "The landmark requires that 
a book of the law, a religious code of 
some kind, purporting to be an exemplar 
of the revealed will of God, shall form an 
essential part of the furniture of every 
lodge." The true Mason recognizes the 
Koran, together with all other religious 
codes, with the same sacredness and rev- 
erence that he does the Holy Bible, 
teaching that all are of equal authority 
and value. 

In Masonic Home Journal, the official 
organ of the Grand Lodge of the state 
of Kentucky, under date of January 1, 
1918, appears the following striking ar- 
ticle, from the pen of A. H. G. Hard- 
wick, 33 Hon.: "It is, to say the least, 
a careless inexactness of speech that 
calls the Bible the Word of God. A 
book written by human hands, trans- 
lated from one language into another by 
fallible human minds cannot be called 
the word of God. And even were we in 
possession of the original manuscript in 
the Hebrew and Greek, we could not 
say it was the word of God." 

The question arises, does being a true 
Mason imply being a Christian? If so, 
it implies being a Mohammedan, a Bud- 
dist, a Unitarian, a Mormon, or anything 
' else that has a religious code. Freema- 
sonry reduces the Holy Bible to the 



level of heathen religious codes and 
thereby registers a positive denial of its 
inspiration. The true Mason is a man 
who holds membership in a subordinate 
lodge and subscribes to the laws, and 
principles, of his Grand Jurisdiction, as 
is laid down in the constitution of the 
Grand lodge. The Grand lodge says, in 
Landmark 21, that the Koran is of equal 
authority and value with the Holy Bible 
and the true Mason accepts the state- 
ment as a fact and orders his life ac- 
cordingly. 

Jesus says : "No man can serve two 
masters" (Matt. 6:24). Either Jesus is 
mistaken or being a Freemason bars a 
man from being a Christian so long as 
he remains in Masonic fellowship. St. 
Paul says: "Though we or an angel 
from heaven, preach any other gospel 
unto you than that which we have 
preached unto you, let him be accursed." 
(Gal. 1:8.) Notwithstanding the tes- 
timony of Jesus and St. Paul, a man to 
be a true Mason must recognize other 
masters and other gospels with the same 
reverence that he does the Holy Bible. 
In other words the true Mason recog- 
nizes the Koran and the Old Testament 
as of equal value and repudiates Jesus 
Christ and the New Testament as not 
suitable for lodge use. Does being a 
true Mason imply being a Christian? 
Does it not rather class him with all 
other heathen worshipers and close the 
door of Christianity against him? 
A Conformed Life. 
Christianity conforms the life to the 
precepts of Bible truth ; doing these 
things which God's word requires and 
refraining from those things which it 
forbids. 

Freemasonry runs roughshod over 
the sacred volume, disregarding both 
precept and example. The Bible says, 
Call no man your master upon earth, 
neither be ye called masters ; for one is 
your master, the Christ (Matt. 23:9-10). 
Notwithstanding this very earnest and 
positive precept made by Christ, Free- 
masonry arrays one of its number and 
seats him on a throne, like Herod, and 
all the members of the craft call him 
"Worshipful Master." This procedure 
of the Masonic lodge* is nothing less 
than idolatry. When Daniel was called 
upon to offer a like service he chose the 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



19 




Skeleton Seizing Candidate When Taking 
Oath 33rd Degree. 



lion's den rather than yield. It is said, 
"Upon a set day, Herod arrayed in royal 
apparel sat upon his throne and made 
an oration unto them. And the people 
gave a shout, saying it is the voice of 
a god and not of a man, and immediately 
the angel of the Lord smote him and he 
was eaten of worms and gave up the 
ghost." (Acts 12:21-23.) The Masonic 
Masters may not be smitten immediate- 
ly, like Herod, but the unworthy crown 
will soon fall from that so-called peg of 
virtue and the old Dives will lift up his 
eyes in hell and cry for some one to 
be sent back into this world to warn 
his Masonic brethren lest they also go to 
that place of torments. Jesus says, 
" Every one that heareth these sayings 
of mine and doeth them not shall be 
likened unto a foolish man who built 
his house upon the sand, and the rains 
descended and the floods came and the 
winds blew and beat upon that house ; 
and it fell ; and great was the fall of 
it." (Matt. 7:26-27.) 

Citizenship. 
Christianity disqualifies a man for be- 
ing a disloyal citizen. St. Paul ■ says : 
'Let every soul be subject to the higher 



power, for there is no power but of God. 
Whosoever resisteth the power resist- 
eth the ordinance of God ; and they that 
resist shall receive to themselves dam- 
nation." (Romans 13:1-3.) 

Freemasonry says, in the Masonic 
Constitution, on page 4, "If a brother be 
a rebel against the state, he is not to be 
countenanced in his rebellion. How- 
ever he may be pitied as an unhappy 
man and if convicted of no other crime 
though the loyal brotherhood must and 
ought to disown his rebellion, and give 
no umbrage or grounds for political jeal- 
ousy to the government, for the time be- 
ing they cannot expel him from the 
lodge and his relation to it remains in- 
defeasible." "No umbrage or ground 
for political jealousy, to the government, 
for the time being," can mean nothing 
less than that the rebellious brother is 
in perfect accord with the spirit of Free- 
masonry, but out of harmony with pres- 
ent plans. "The time being" is expres- 
sive of an anticipated end to be achieved 
at some future time. The only logical 
conclusion to be reached from this offi- 
cial Masonic statement is that the whole 
Masonic system stands in secret rebel- 
lion against the government and when 
ithe proper time arrives the rebellion 
will be put into execution. The above 
reasoning finds full proof of its grounds 
in Masonic Constitution, on page 7, and 
reads as follows : "No private piques 
or quarrels must be brought within the 
door of the lodge, far less any quarrels 
about religion, or nation, or state pol- 
icy, we being only as Masons, of that 
Catholic religion above mentioned. We 
are also of all nations, tongues, kin- 
dreds, and languages and are resolved 
against all politics." 

These two official statements embod- 
ied in the Masonic Constitution show 
conclusively that the underlying prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry are opposed to 
all Political Government save its own 
and in due time hopes to effect its over- 
throw. The German government was 
as much opposed to Democracy in 1850 
as it was in 1914, but dared not make 
her plans known until she thought she 
had strength and preparation enough to 
carry out her diabolical designs. For 
many years Germany was careful not to 
give umbrage or grounds for political 



120 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



jealousy "for the time being," The 
three forces which conspire to destroy 
Republican Government are Romanism, 
Kaiserism, and Freemasonry. These 
three institutions are alike in both their 
plans and purposes. To be an anarchist 
disqualifies a man for being a Christian, 
but to be a true Mason, a man must con- 
form his life to the Masonic Constitu- 
tion which declares officially that Free- 
masonry is opposed to all politics. 
Women. 

Christianity honors and elevates 
women. 

Freemasonry dishonors and degrades 
them by officially classing them with 
slaves, the amorous and scandalous men. 
On page 4 and 5 of the Masonic Con- 
stitution may be found these words. 
"Persons admitted members of a lodge 
must be good and true men, freeborn 
and of mature and discreet age. No 
bondmen, no women, no immoral or 
scandalous men, but of good report." 
The man who unites with a Masonic 
lodge classes the woman, that he led to 
the sacred altar and there solemnly 
vowed to honor, with the trash of the 
world. And in order to conceal his base- 
ness he further deceives her by making 
her believe that he holds membership 
in an institution that honors and pro- 
tects women. There isn't a man in the 
Masonic fraternity that honors women. 
There isn't a man in the Masonic fra- 
ternity today who wouldn't ask the court 
to grant him a divorce if his wife held 
membership in an institution that gave 
official notice' that he was classed with 
the scandalous women of the country. 
But says one, "Women are recognized 
in Masonry today. They have the East- 
ern Star, which is woman Masonry." 
What is the Eastern Star? The Masonic 
Home Journal, the official organ of the 
Grand lodge of the state of Kentucky, 
says : "Adoptive Masonry, of which 
the Eastern Star is the only representa- 
tive in the country today, and which is 
certainly no more than a nick-name for 
it is not Freemasonry." The time came 
when women demanded some considera- 
tion and the men got busy and instituted 
the Eastern Star and called it Masonry 
as a kind of pacifier. There isn't any 
more Freemasonry in the Eastern Star 
than there is in the socialist party. The 



poor, deluded fair sex ought to read 
Landmark 18, in connection with a 
statement, on page 11, of Masonic con- 
stitution which reads as follows: "The 
Landmarks of the craft, like the law of 
the Medes and Persians, can suffer no 
change." The Christian regards his 
wife as being equal with himself. The 
true Mason regards his wife, together 
with all other women, as only suitable 
to be associated with slaves and scan- 
dalous men. 

Love. 

Love is one of the vital elements of 
Christianity and like truth, love is so 
essentially necessary to Christian char- 
acter that there can be no Christian char- 
acter without it. St. Paul says : "Though 
I bestow all my goods to feed the poor 
and have not charity (love) it profiteth 
me nothing." Christian love is an indis- 
criminate love. Jesus says, "Love your 
enemies, bless them that curse you, pray 
for them which despitefully use you and 
persecute you. (Matt. 5:44.) 

Freemasonry says on page 8, of Ma- 
sonic Constitution.: "You are to ex- 
amine a strange brother in such a method 
as prudence shall direct you, that you 
may not be imposed upon by a false 
pretender, whom you reject with con- 
tempt and derision." It isn't enough to 
be careful of strangers, but all strangers 
according to Masonic law, must be des- 
pised until they give satisfactory evi- 
dence of being Masons. What institu- 
tions have always regarded strangers 
with suspicion? Not Christian institu- 
tions, to be sure. St. Paul says: "Be 
not forgetful to entertain strangers." 
(Heb. 13:2.) Christian men are not 
engaged in anything to compel them to 
hold strangers in suspicion. Those who 
are suspicious of strangers are usually 
those who are engaged in something that 
is too corrupt to stand public inspec- 
tion, such as gambling, bootl edging, or 
such seditious plans and works as is 
fostered in Freemasonry. One of the 
greatest thinkers of this age says, "Any 
cause that fears publicity, that shuns 
facing all the facts in the open, should 
be held under suspicion." Freemasonry 
talks much and loud about love, but 
every principle laid down in the Ma- 
sonic Constitution fosters hatred to- 



August. 191 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



121 



wards everybody outside of the Masonic 
institution. 

The New Birth. 
Christianity holds tenaciously to 
Christ's doctrines of the new birth as 
the initiatory into that blessed state 
called Christianity. Jesus says, "Except 
a man be born of water and of the Spirit 
he cannot enter into the kingdom of 
God." (John 3:5.) Paul says, "Not "by 
works of righteousness which we have 
done, but according to His mercy, he 
saved us by washing of regeneration and 
renewing of the Holy Ghost." (Titus 
3:5.)- This plain unmistakable language 
of Jesus and the great apostle, marks 
out the divine plan of becoming a Chris- 
tian and in no uncertain sound does Je- 
sus affirm that this is the only way. 
Notwithstanding these positive divine 
declarations by Jesus and St. Paul, Free- 
masonry teaches, in Mackey's Manual 
of the Lodge, on page 20 and 21, that 
a man who asks for admission into the 
lodge "Stands without our portals on 
the threshold of this new Masonic life, 
in darkness, helplessness, and ignorance, 
having been wandering amid the errors 
and covered over with the pollutions of 
the outer and profane world, he comes 
inquiringly to our doors seeking the new 
birth. There is to be not simply a change 
for the future, but also an extinction of 
the past : for initiation is, as it were, a 
death to the world and a resurrection to 
a new life." Jesus says, "Except a man 
be born of water and of the spirit he 
cannot enter into the kingdom of God." 
Freemasonry says: "Initiation into the 
lodge is the resurrection into the new 
life." If a Freemason can be a Chris- 
tian, regeneration is not necessary to 
salvation and Jesus and St. Paul were 
mistaken. After laying violent hands 
upon and maliciously setting aside the 
Scriptural doctrine of the new birth, 
some sanctimonious looking old Ma- 
sonic Judas Tscariot — he is often a Ma- 
sonic preacher — will shoot up his old Sa- 
tanic head and say, "A man can't be a 
true Mason without being a Christian." 
The man who makes this statement 
knows that he lies when he makes it, but 
deception is the plan and he is only put- 
ting into practice the fundamental prin- 
ciples that a man is supposed to live up 
to if he is a true Mason. God said, 
through the Psalmist. "They provoked 



Him to anger with their inventions." 
(Psa. [06:29.) The doctrine of Free- 
masonry can never lead a man into the 
experience of a Christian., but rather 
bars the door of Christianity against him 
so long as he remains in its fellowship. 
God. 

The Christian has but one living and 
true God and his whole conscious life 
conforms to Christ's teachings relative 
to the oneness of God. Jesus says: "Hear 
O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord." 
The Christian guards carefully against 
dividing his devotions, remembering 
that God is a jealous God. 

Freemasonry voices her fundamental 
doctrines of God, in Masonic Home 
Journal, of August 1st, 1917, on page 2, 
in the following : "There is a principle 
implanted in the heart of man which 
prompts him to the belief and acknowl- 
edgment of a superior and superintend- 
ing power, under whatever name he may 
have been personified. It displays a 
God of nature who loves virtue and ab- 
hors vice. The particular letters by 
which the name of the Grand Architect 
of the universe is spelled or the particu- 
lar way in which his name may be pro- 
nounced are as utterly immaterial as to 
pray to our God in English, to Unser 
Gott in German, or to Notre Dieu, in 
French." To the true Mason the God 
of nature speaks through Moses, Mo- 
hammed, Buddha, Brahma, Joe Smith 
and may be called by any old name that 
best serves the craft. Is it a small mat- 
ter to deal thus in the sacred name of 
our God? God says: "Now I will 
bring again the captivity of Jacob, and 
have mercy upon the whole house of 
Israel, and will be jealous for my holy 
Name." To the Christian God is a per- 
son possessing attributes characteristic 
of His divine personality and must be 
worshiped in exclusion of all other 
gods. The true Mason recognizes God 
as the God of nature reduced to a com- 
mon level of the heathen gods, and may 
be called by any name suitable for 
heathen worship. A true Mason might 
be a heathen, but he can never be a 
Christian. 

Jesus Christ. 

Jesus Christ is the central, funda- 
mental, and indispensable personage in 
Christianity. Without Him Christianity 
cannot be. It is around Him that the 



1.22 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



Christian builds character for time and 
hope for eternity. To remove Jesus 
would destroy the Christian's God and 
the Christian's hope. Jesus says, "I am 
the way, the truth, and the life, no man 
cometh to the Father but by me." (John 
14.6.) Peter says, "There is none other 
name under heaven given among men 
whereby we must be saved." (Acts 4:12.) 
If it can be shown that Freemasonry 
repudiates Jesus Christ, it will require 
no argument to prove conclusively that 
Freemasonry destroys Christianity rath- 
er than promotes it, and that a man so 
long as he holds Masonic fellowship can- 
not be a Christian. The Masonic atti- 
tude, towards Jesus, lies beneath the 
surface and must be discovered through 
a process of development. The inves- 
tigation begins with Landmark 21, in 
Masonic Constitution and reads as fol- 
lows: "Masonry does not attempt to 
interfere with the peculiar faiths of its 
disciples, except so far as relates to the 
belief in God and what necessarily re- 
sults from that belief." "That belief" 
makes its first appearance on page 4, of 
the Masonic Constitution and reads, "In 
ancient times Masons were charged, in 
every country, to be of the religion of 
that country, or nation ; whatever it was, 
yet 'tis now thought more expedient 
only to oblige them to that religion in 
which all men agree." The thought is 
further developed on page 7, of the same 
volume in these words, "We being only 
as Masons of that catholic religion above 
mentioned." The quotations mean noth- 
ing less than that Freemasonry officially 
repudiates Jesus Christ, and broadens 
the lines of . Masonic religion so as to 
recognize Mohammed's god, with the 
Mohammedans, Buddha's god, with the 
Buddhists, Brahma's god with the Brah- 
mans, that all Masons may worship har- 
• moniously at the Masonic altar. The 
true Mason worships on the prayer rug, 
with Kaiser Bill and the Sultan of Tur- 
key, as conscientiously as he does in a 
protestant church in America. 

The Christian recognizes Jesus Christ 
alone as his hope of salvation. St. Paul 
says, "Other foundations can no man 
lay than that is laid which is Jesus 
Christ." (1 Cor. 3:11.) The Christian 
builds his hope upon Jesus as his only 
hope. The true Mason removes Christ 



as the foundation of his hope and 
builds upon a foundation laid by heath- 
en philosophers, which is suitable only 
for heathen character building and wor- 
ship. The Masonic doctrine relative to 
Jesus Christ is fully explained, on pages 
271 and 272 of Mackey's Masonic Rit- 
ualist, in the following exposition. 
"Wherefore, brethren, laying aside all 
malice, and guile, and hypocrisies, and 
envies, and all evil speaking, if so be ye 
have tasted that the Lord is gracious, to 
whom coming as unto a living stone, dis- 
allowed indeed of men, but chosen of 
God and precious. Ye also as living stones 
be ye built up a spiritual house, and holy 
priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacri- 
fices acceptable to God. Wherefore, also, 
it is contained in the Scriptures, "Be- 
hold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a 
tried stone, a precious corner stone, a 
sure foundation ; he that believeth, shall 
not make haste to pass it over. Unto 
you, therefore, which believe it is an 
honor ; and even to them which be dis- 
obedient, the stone which the builders 
disallowed, the same is made the head 
of the corner. Brethren, this is the will 
of God, that with well doing ye put to 
silence the ignorance of foolish men. As 
free and not using your liberty for a 
cloak of maliciousness, but as the serv- 
ants of God. Honor all men, love the 
brotherhood, fear God." In an explana- 
tory note, Dr. Mackey says: "The 
passages of Scripture here selected are 
peculiarly appropriate to this degree : 
"The repeated reference to the living 
stone, to the tried stone, the precious 
corner stone, and more especially the 
stone which the builders disallowed, are 
intended to impress the mind, not only 
with the essential ceremonies of the de- 
gree, but also with its most important 
and significant symbol." "The passages 
are taken, WITH SLIGHT BUT NEC- 
ESSARY MODIFICATIONS, from 
the 26th chapter of the First Epistle of 
Peter and the 28th chapter of Isa." The 
question at once arises, what are the 
SLIGHT BUT NECESSARY MODI- 
FICATIONS MADE? First, it is lay- 
ing the vile hands of the Masonic craft 
upon the sacred name of Jesus Christ 
and removing it from the Holy Scrip- 
tures. The Scriptures are selected from 
the 2d chapter of I Peter. Verse 5 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



123 






reads as follows : "Ye also as living 
stones are built up a spiritual house as 
holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual 
sacrifices acceptable to God BY JESUS 
CHRIST." Freemasonry lays violent 
hands upon this divine declaration, 
which sets before the mind God's plan 
of human redemption, through Jesus 
Christ, and removes his name from the 
sacred record and calls it "A SLIGHT 
BUT NECESSARY MODIFICA- 
TION." The true Mason, whom Free- 
masons say is a Christian, gives endorse- 
ment to and lives in perfect harmony 
with an institution which blots out the 
name of Jesus Christ and then makes 
the assertion that a man can't be a true 
Mason without being a Christian. Free- 
masonry adds sin to sin by mutilating 
the Bible and then trying to deceive the 
public into the belief that a man must 
necessarily be a Christian if he lives up 
to the principle of the Masonic order. 
Mind you, Mackey says : The removal 
of Christ's name from the Holy Scrip- 
ture is a 'SLIGHT CHANGE,' but it is 
necessary to Masonic Lodge operations. 
Such treatment of the sacred name 
of our Redeemer is nothing less than 
blasphemy in the sight of God and 
should be regarded as such by the church 
of Christ everywhere. If Freemasonrv 
promotes Christianity, Jesus Christ is 
not necessary to salvation, and his ut- 
terances in the fourteenth chapter of 
John are false, and he is a presumptuous 
pretender who has no merit. But if 
Christ be true, and we know he is, Free- 
masonry robs its constituents of every 
possible hope of being Christians, be- 
cause he says: "No mancometh to the 
Father but by Me." Freemasonry cru- 
cifies the Son of God afresh and puts 
Him to an open shame. In Masonic 
Home Journal, the official organ of the 
Grand lodge of the state of Kentucky, 
under date of June I, 191 7, on page 12, 
may be read, "Every ancient Landmark 
of Freemasonry, every sign and symbol 
known by us, and between us as breth- 
ren, indicates that we CANNOT AS A 
BODY RECOGNIZE JESUS, BUD- 
DHA, MOHAMED, OR MOSES, OR 
ANY OF THE DENOMINATIONAL 
CHURCHES OF EITHER." "All 
prayers.or speeches that recognize or ap- 
proach any deity or prophet save God 



alone are out of place in a Masonic 
lodge. Sometimes a minister, in offer- 
ing prayers in a Masonic meeting, inad- 
vertently uses the name of Jesus, but in 
all cases, in our opinion, it is the force 
of habit and never done intentionally." 
If Masonic publications are to be relied 
upon, Freemasonry mutilates the Bible, 
repudiates Christ, destroys God's plan 
of human redemption, and undertakes to 
approach God presumptuously independ- 
ent of a mediator. It requires only two 
quotations from the Holy Scriptures, to 
show how Freemasonry stands before 
God. John says : "If any man shall add 
unto these things, God shall add unto 
him the plagues that are written in this 
Book. And if any man shall take away 
from the words of the Book, of this 
prophecy, God shall take away his part 
out of the Book of life." (Rev. 
22:18-19.) Jesus says: "Verily, verily, 
I say unto you, he that entereth not by 
the door into the sheepfold, but climbeth 
up some other way, the same is a thief 
and a robber. I am the door : by me if 
any man enter in, he shall be saved." 
(John 10:1-9.) If Freemasonry were in 
perfect harmony with every fundamental 
principle of Christianity except in this 
one particular it would still have sin 
enough left to bar every member of the 
institution from favor with God and 
consign the whole craft to the bottomless 
pit throughout all eternity." 



j£eto£ of 0viv WAovk 

THE OHIO LUTHERAN SYNOD. 

On the twelfth of July I had the pleas- 
ure of visiting the Wisconsin District 
Ohio Lutheran Synod which met in 
Michigan City, Indiana. On account of 
train delavs I was over five hours in 
reaching the Conference, but was given 
a few moments at the close of the day's 
session to say a few words as to the 
National Christian Association, after 
being pleasantly introduced by the Pres- 
ident of the Synod, Rev. M. P. F. Doer- 
mann. who strongly favors the N. C. A. 
and its work. The Synod voted unani- 
mously, endorsing the purposes and ob- 
jects of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, and declared that its aims and ef- 
forts were worthy of their support. Fol- 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



lowing the adjournment we had the 
pleasure of enjoying a bountiful meal 
with the delegates. Some came forward 
after the adjournment and ordered 
books, seven others became annual sub- 
scribers to the Cynosure and one paid 
for a number of sample copies to be sent 
to different parties. We regret reaching 
the Conference so late in the day and at a 
time when we were practically physically 
exhausted, for otherwise we believe a 
much larger list of Cynosure subscribers 
would have been obtained. It was a 
pleasure to listen to the earnest and 
patriotic sentiments of the delegates dur- 
ing the short time that we were per- 
mitted to be present. The Synod is 
composed of Germans, but they are true 
and loyal Americans, none more so. 
judging from the remarks to which we 
listened. W. I. P. 



THE CYNOSURE HARD HIT. 

The Christian Cynosure has been 
denied the level rate of postage granted 
to other newspapers and periodicals 
maintained by and in the interest of re- 
ligious, educational, scientific, philan- 
thropic, agricultural, labor, or fraternal 
organizations, or associations, not or- 
ganized for profit and none of the net 
income of which inures to the benefit of 
any private stockholder or individual. 

The National Christian Association 
asked for the level rate of postage for 
the Cynosure, as a religious .publication, 
coming under the above named require- 
ments of the law. It will be remembered 
that representatives of seventeen differ- 
ent religious organizations were present 
and helped organize this Association. 
The Cynosure stands for the religious 
convictions of more than seventeen de- 
nominations. 

On July 13th the postal authorities 
ruled that the Cynosure does not come 
within any of the provisions which would 
exempt it from the zone rate of postage. 
Our subscribers will understand that this 
number of the Cynosure has to be sent 
out under the zone rate, the zones being 
the same as for books and other litera- 
ture. We consider the decision very un- 
just. It will increase considerably the 
cost of getting the magazine to our read- 
ers. The Huddleston Bill drive failed 
to weaken the Association's efforts and 



this drive at increasing the postage rate 
on the Cynosure, while allowing all 
lodge papers the level rate of postage., 
may be considered a success, but wc 
hope it will be but for a short time. 

We have received the following, 
which doubtless will be found to be the 
sentiments of many of the denomina- 
tions : 

Chicago, July 13th, 1918. 

The Norwegian Lutheran Church of 
America, with a communicant member- 
ship of about five hundred thousand, en- 
dorses the Christian Cynosure on con- 
scientious grounds, and in the interest of 
religious purity, and it respectfully ap- 
peals from the decision of the postal au- 
thorities, and asks that the case be re- 
heard and the Christian Cynosure be 
granted the level rate of postage which 
other religious publications enjoy. 

(Signed) P. A. Kittilsby, 

Vice Pres. English Assn. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

The prayer of the Christian "Lord re- 
vive Thy work" was never more in place 
than at the present time. With the thou- 
sand things pushing for attention it 
would be strange if there were not lax- 
ness in the maintenance of some. There 
is likely as much sentiment in favor of 
the N. C. A. reform as there ever has 
been. The difficulty seems to be to get 
the expression. I am glad to be able to 
report that God has graciously sustained 
and helped in the work where I have 
labored. Continuing in Lancaster and 
Lebanon counties in Pennsylvania I 
found open doors for meetings and a 
good response of the friends. Going to 
the Mennonite Bible Conference at the 
"Groffdale Church" I was kindly granted 
a hearing, although the program was 
crowded. I was surprised to see the 
general interest manifest in this gather- 
ing. Although it was harvest time many 
came from a distance and the large 
church was well filled in the day as well 
as at the evening sessions. 

While working in Lebanon county I 
was given a hearing in two churches of 
the Brethren and in the Lebanon faith 
Tabernacle Mission. Tracts were dis- 
tributed and a good list of subscriptions 
to the Cynosure obtained. After a short 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



125 



season at home, I came to Western 
Pennsylvania and spent a Sabbath near 
Masontown, speaking in the Church of 
the Brethren and the Mennonite Church. 
These services were largely attended by 
the young people. I trust good seed was 
60wn that will bring forth fruit in eter- 
nity. I wonder if we realize the import- 
ance and blessing of guiding the youth 
in paths of righteousness. They are to 
be the men and women who will make 
our country what it is in the future. My 
first work on entering Ohio was at 
Youngstown. This busy center of indus- 
try is greatly rushed in its present work. 
The great iron and steel mills here found 
are doing their best in response to the 
Government call. At Columbiana, Lee- 
tonia, Salem, Alliance, and Louisville, 
Ohio, I succeeded in renewing Cynosure 
subscriptions of other years, and adding 
some who will be our helpers in the fu- 
ture. Some days were spent in Canton, 
Ohio, and four addresses delivered. I 
spoke in the Evangelical Wesleyan Meth- 
odist and Free Methodist churches there. 
Rev. Mr. Bendle was conducting a series 
of lectures in the Mennonite Mission 
Church which were attracting much no- 
tice. Brother Bendle has given over 
twenty years of study along the line of 
prophecy on which he speaks. 

I was enabled to add something to the 
interest created in our work by our Con- 
vention in the Wesleyan Church at Can- 
ton some years since. Arrangements are 
made for me to speak at Barberton, 
Ohio, in the Wesleyan Methodist church, 
next Sabbath, and other meetings are to 
follow. Surely our message is timely. 
Much emphasis is being laid on our De- 
mocracy just now. If a secret society is 
out of place anywhere, it certainly must 
be where the people are to rule, and 
where all are to have an equal chance. 
Naturally, those who feel they are born 
to lord it over the rest of creation would 
not like the open method of dealing. If 
there is to be "graft" and the "special 
pull" there will be the darkness loving. 
May God deliver our nation and keep us 
free men and women in Christ. 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Dear Cynosure: 

This leaves me in better health and 
still in the fight for Jesus. I left Ar- 



genta, Arkansas, the fourth day of June, 
and I have been in St. Louis ever since 
then till last Monday. I left there to 
hold a meeting here in Alton, Illinois. 
The Lord blessed me and gave me 
strength to speak to more than a thou- 
sand people at the state Holiness meet- 
ing. I taught God's Word and what the 
Apostle said to the Corinthian church 
and to all believers in Christ (2 Cor. 
6:14-18). I said to my sister and 
brothers God has said come out. Now 
the churches do profess Christ and do 
pretend to love and honor the Lord, but 
the lodges don't require any profession 
of Christ to join. 

Some of us want to live in God's 
church and stay in the lodges, but Jesus 
has said "Ye cannot serve God and 
Mammon." Now I find that all people 
who are not willing to give up the lodge 
will get angry when we tell them what 
the Lord has said in His Word about 
these things. I said, God's Bible con- 
demns the lodges from start to end. First 
the Bible says, Swear not at all (Math. 
5:33-37 and James 5:12). They make 
you swear to gtt into them, and if you 
are not very careful they will make you 
fight, curse and swear to stay in them. 
They darken the room and blindfold you 
to take you in. Jesus said, "Men love 
darkness rather than light because their 
deeds are evil" (John 3 :i()). They whis- 
per the password: Solomon said "A 
whisperer separateth chief friends" 
(Prov. 16:28). The Apostle Paul said 
"Whispering was an evil practiced by 
them whom the Lord gave over to work- 
all uncleanness" (Rom. 1:23-29). Solo- 
mon said a wicked man "winketh with 
his eye, speaketh with his feet and teach- 
etbwith his fingers" (Prov. 6:12-13). I 
said, Brother, some of you say Jesus was 
a Mason, but Jesus said, "In secret have 
I said nothing" (John 18:20). Now, 
who are you going to believe, the Lord 
Jesus or your worshipful master? I said 
I never was a Mason, but I know this 
book is Masonry because I can see you 
talking to each other with your eyes and 
nudging each other in the side, and the 
^vhite and yellow Masons change color 
to red, and the black men get kind of 
ashy in color. It is the truth one of the 
ministers said, "Give it to them. Sister 
Roberson ; if I tell them that thev will 



126 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



kill me." I said, yes, they may kill me, 
but if they do they will have to meet this 
word at the last day, Rev. 20:12-15, when 
the Book is open they will be judged out 
of the Book. Amen. I gave out many 
tracts. Men seemed to be dumfounded 
about their secrets being exposed. One 
man came to me and bought a Masonic 
ritual and a woman bought a Masonic 
ritual and one Eastern Star ritual. Anoth- 
er woman bought an Odd Fellows ritual. 
I think some of the brothers sent the 
women to buy them for their own use. 
Dr. Blanchard's tract, "Patriot and the 
Lodge" is a wonderful eye opener. Men 
are beginning to see their mistake. Those 
whose hearts are honest. I told the 
lodge sisters and brothers to write to the 
National Christian Association and they 
would learn of all the different denomi- 
nations who are sick of the lodge and 
come out and are telling the sin that is 
in them. Now God bless all the Cyno- 
sure readers. Let your prayers go up 
for our country, for our President and 
for our boys in the camps and in the 
trenches fighting for our freedom. I 
am praying. I have a step-son some- 
where in the camp. And not only him 
but all the boys, both white and black, 
shall have my prayers and all that I am 
able to give to help. Pray for my health. 
I am not so strong, but I must do the 
work He gives me while it is called to- 
day. Yours for the Master's use, 

Lizzie Roberson. 



SOUTHERN AGENT'S REPORT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

I am enjoying fairly good health and 
have been very busy since my last letter, 
thank God. I have attended two Con- 
ferences and two District Executive 
Boards and one Association. I was priv- 
ileged to use five to ten minutes' time in 
each meeting. I have preached at the 
following churches, to wit: Amazion 
Baptist, Deacon J. Lockett, New Or- 
leans. This great historic old church has 
been without a pastor since Rev. S. E. 
Piercy resigned last February to go to 
Georgia. This is one of the leading 
churches intellectually and strong numer- 
ically and financially, but it is dictated to 
and ruled by the secret lodge element. 



Several friends suggested my name as a 
pastor, but the secretists declared it 
would never do to elect me pastor of that 
church. Some of the secret lodge min- 
isters are bitter antagonists to my secur- 
ing a pastoral charge anywhere in this 
city. I also spoke at Rising Star Bap- 
tist church, Rev. Wm. Cosey, D. D., pas- 
tor and Mount Pilgrim Baptist church. 
This is another strong pastorless church, 
and secret lodges dominate it. At St. 
Mark's Fourth Baptist church, Rev. 
Jackson Acox, pastor, this is the most 
historic Negro Baptist church in the city. 
It was here where I was baptized nearly 
forty years ago. It was then a strong 
anti-secrecy church, but now it is almost 
completely absorbed by the secret lodges, 
I also spoke at First Pilgrim Baptist 
church, Rev. B. J. Cole, pastor, an ear- 
nest and faithful young shepherd, at 
Israel Baptist church, Rev. A. W. Wil- 
liams, D. D., A. B., pastor. Rev. Wil- 
liams is one of the best prepared and en- 
ergetic of New Orleans pastors. He is 
doing a great work. I held a three days' 
Ministers' and Deacons' Institute at the 
Fifth Baptist church, Rev. R. P. Porter, 
pastor, but very little interest was mani- 
fest and the meeting was a complete fail- 
ure. This church is another secret lodge 
nest. All of the above churches are in 
New Orleans. I held an Institute of 
three days at Asia Baptist church, Rev. 
R. Watson, pastor, Mereauxville, Louis- 
iana. This young man is an earnest and 
faithful shepherd of his flock and is un- 
compromising with the devil. His people 
love him and he is deserving of praise. 
His heart was in the right place and the 
meeting was a great success. I held an 
Institute at St. Andrew Baptist church, 
Rev. Lloyd Madison, pastor, English- 
town, Louisiana. This was a great meet- 
ing. Seven were restored to the fellow- 
ship of the church during the four days' 
meeting and fourteen came forward for 
prayer. Rev. Madison is a worthy pas- 
tor and richly deserves the unstinted sup- 
port of the brethren. Englishtown is 
strongly hedged about with secret 
lodges and lodge influence. I have been 
invited by Rev. E. E. Dorsey, St. Pat- 
rick,. Louisiana, and Rev. H. W. F. 
Nixon, Paincourtville, La., to hold insti- 
tutes in their churches. 



August, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



127 



FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS. 

QUESTION: The Bible says: "Who- 
soever doeth not righteousness is not of 
God." If a preacher or elder in the 
church who has taken the following oath, 
"That I will assist a companion (....) 
when engaged in any difficulty, and 
espouse his cause so far as to extricate 
him from the same, if in my power, 
whether it be right or wrong," (i). Is 
either of them worthy of the name of 
leader in God's work? They have will- 
fully taken an oath to do "righ or wrong" 
to suit the pleasure of their worldly 
brother regardless of God's commands. 
(2.) Should we as professing Christians 
bow to such leadership or should we 
"Come out from among them and be ye 
separate" ? 

Anszver: (i.) No. 

(2.) Keep up your testimony private- 
ly and publicly on every proper occasion. 
The Holy Spirit says in Ephesians 5:11, 
"Have no fellowship with the unfruitful 
works of darkness, but rather reprove 
them." The marginal reading is "con- 
vict them." Many church members who 
are lodge men, are ignorant of the prin- 
ciples of their lodge and should be dealt 
with kindly and faithfully and that is 
the reason why the Scriptures say, "re- 
prove" and "convict." Usually there are 
many members of the church that are 
in need of enlightenment, and many who 
are not in the church also need enlight- 
enment. That is the reason why we are 
commanded to let our light shine. There 
are tracts and books abundant now, 
thanks to the N. C. A., so that one de- 
siring to give light to their neighbors 
may do so easily. If a church was whol- 
ly given over to idolatry and refused to 
receive the light, I think in that case one 
ought to come out from such a church, 
giving them the reasons for such action 
kindly and clearly. Hundreds of minis- 
ters have come into the light and re- 
nounced their secret orders and works 
of darkness since we began our testi- 
mony, and hence a minister should not 
be considered a hopeless case, though 
as a rule they are more hopeless than or- 
dinary Christians because they sin against 
greater light. I think we should have no 
hesitancy in refusing to support a min- 
ister who refuses to be enlightened and 



is determined to adhere to his lodge rela- 
tion and obligations. 



In the Christian Cynosurk, Vol. 51, No. 1, 
May, 1918, we published a letter received from 
a Scotch Rite 32° Mason, James A. Cooper, 
Youngstown, Ohio, some of whose titles are the 
following : Prince of Rose Croix, Grand Pon- 
tiff, Knight of the Brazen Serpent, Prince of 
Mercy, Knight of the Sun, Knight of the 
Black and White Eagle, Grand Inspector In- 
quisitor Commander, and Sublime Prince of 
the Royal Secret. Shall anyone dare to con- 
sider these titles "blasphemous or ridiculous"? 

The following correspondence between this 
prominent Mason and Rev. Mr. Clemens is 
another illustration of the difficulty of secur- 
ing a frank and friendly presentation of the 
differences between the principles of the 
Church and the Lodge. — Editor. 

Huntington, Ind., May 8th, 1918. 
J. A. Cooper, 

Youngstown, Ohio. 
Dear Sir: 

Your letter of December 17th, 1917, 
written to the National Christian Associ- 
ation, appears in the Christian Cyno- 
sure of May, 1918. In your letter you 
assert that said Association ought to be 
called the National Association of Liars 
and Perjurers. Now, I happen to be 
identified with the National Christian 
Association, and I feel that your asser- 
tion ought not to go unchallenged. Ac- 
cordingly, I do hereby invite you to a 
public discussion of the character of the 
various orders in the secret empire. A 
thorough investigation will doubtless re- 
sult in locating the lies and the liars. An 
Assembly Room has been offered for the 
purpose in our city and I give my per- 
sonal pledge of $5 to apply on your trav- 
eling expenses, if you come to Hunting- 
ton for a public discussion of the ques- 
tions. A prompt reply to my invitation 
is kindly requested. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed) Moses H. Clemens, 
Evangelical Catholic Archbishop. 



ANCIENT ACCEPTED SCOTTISH 
RITE, NORTHERN MASONIC JU- 
RISDICTION U. S. A., VALLEY 
OF YOUNGSTOWN. 

Youngstown, Ohio, May 10th, 19 18. 
My Dear Sir: 

Replying to yours of 8th instant, must 
say that no reputable Mason would con- 
descend to discuss Masonry with anyone 
connected with those people who base 
their opinions on the word of "liars" and 



128 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



August, 1918 



"perjurers." Masonry needs no defense. 
It has withstood the attacks of this tribe 
of vilifiers for centuries, and is stronger 
and increasing faster than ever. Just as 
well spend time discussing the color of a 
rose with a blind man, or a Beethoven 
Symphony with a deaf man, as to argue 
with this sort of men. It would be as 
fruitless as to argue the doctrine of eter- 
nal punishment with a believer in that 
infamous belief, as a man so utterly des- 
titute of the first principles of justice and 
morality as to believe this doctrine is be- 
neath the notice of really sane men. 

Your title does not abash me in the 
least ; I never was exactly certain 
whether the titles Rev., D. D., B. D., 
Bishop, etc., were blasphemous or ridic- 
ulous. Masonry has no quarrel with the 
Church or with Christianity, but it is in- 
finitely broader than any of those little 
sects and their self-righteous partisans. 
It is the ally of all the forces of civiliza- 
tion and needs no defense against such 
as you and your Association. 

The Church is in bad enough straits 
now with its Theology of the "dark ages" 
without opposing any of the growing in- 
fluences outside of it for the betterment 
of the world. Christianity suffers most 
just now from its "fool friends." 

It is useless for you to try to get Ma- 
sons to dispute with you ; they are above 
such foolishness, and you are making a 
laughing-stock of yourself to imagine 
that any Mason pays any attention to 
such stupid nonsense. Yours, 

(Signed) James A. Cooper. 

Huntington, Ind., May 20th, 1918. 
James A. Cooper, 

Youngstown, Ohio. 
Dear Sir : 

Your letter of the 10th instant lacks 
courtesy, nevertheless I thank you for 
answering my communication. 

Your failure to accept my challenge 
to discuss the character of the Secret 
Empire is an acknowledgment of the 
weakness of your position. A decent and 
orderly discussion of the subject would 
doubtless result in locating the "laughing- 
stocks" also. "Let all things be done de- 
cently and in order," says St. Paul. 
Jesus, the Great Teacher, says : "And 
this is the condemnation, that light is 
come into the world, and men loved 
darkness rather than light, because their 



deeds were evil. For everyone that doeth 
evil hateth the light, neither cometh to 
the light, lest his deeds should be re- 
proved" (John 3:19, 20). St. John 
says : "God is light and in Him is no 
darkness at all. If we say that we have 
fellowship with Him and walk in dark- 
ness we lie and do not tell the truth" 
(1 John, 1:5, 6). Masonic oaths with 
their death penalties prove Masonry to 
be not of God, but of the Devil, and, if 
you are wise, you will renounce the Devil 
and his works. Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Moses H. Clemens, 
Evangelical Catholic Archbishop. 

TRAINING SCHOpL FOR CHAPLAINS 

The third session of the Training 
School for Chaplains is now in progress. 
Maj. Alfred A. Pruden, a chaplain of 
the Coast Artillery Corps, is in charge. 

The training .school is modeled on the 
lines of the Reserve Officers' Training 
School. Stress is laid upon military af- 
fairs rather than upon theological in- 
struction. It is understood by the Gov- 
ernment that all candidates have had 
the necessary theological education when 
their applications are accepted by their 
denominational chaplain committees 
the general committee on Army and 
Navy Chaplains, or the Catholic Chap- 
pains' Bureau. 

According to the Federal Council of 
Churches, the faculty of the training 
school includes representatives from the 
Episcopal Church, the Methodist Epis- 
copal, the Baptist and the Roman Cath- 
olic. Among the candidates are Roman 
Catholics and members of the Augustin- 
ian, the Jesuit and the Redemptional 
Orders, Baptists, Presbyterians. Meth- 
odists, Episcopalians, Congregationalists, 
Lutherans and Disciples, all working and 
conferring together. 

The last session of the training school 
opened July 12. The course covers a 
period of five weeks. During the time 
of instruction the candidates will receive 
the salary and wear the uniform of a pri- 
vate of the United States army. The 
facilities of the school have been so en- 
larged as to accommodate 250 candi- 
dates. This increase has been necessi- 
tated by the demand for chaplains cre- 
ated by the recent passage of the bill 
allowing one chaplain for each 1,200 offi- 
cers and men. 



THE OPEN CONCESSION. 

By Rer. Dr. Jamas M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address steno- 
graphically reported for the National Christian 
Association at Its Annual Meeting, April 8, 1910. 

The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath- bound 
lodge. 

A Personal Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Gray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons.— This is 
within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
is of fundamental importance. 

Describing a Mighty Adversary. — Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System.— Showing 
that it is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 2 cents a 
copy, a package of 25 for 25 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS. 

>These consist of 20 different tracts, envtlopo 
size, of from four to .sixteen pages each. Some 
of them are: Why I Left the Rebekah Lodge. 
Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left th* 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merritt, the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
Secret Societies. The Church and the Lodge. 
Baptist Testimonies. Lodge Religion. The 
"Good Man" Argument. Masonic Obligations. 
Catechism of Oddfellowship. Oddfellowship a 
Religious Institution. Why Do Men Remain 
Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
Association. Two Nights in a Lodge Room. 
The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial Services. 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities in 
State Schools. For Women Who Think — Wom- 
en s Lodges. The Patriot and the Lodge, 
Each, 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madison St. CHICAGO, ILL, 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
eonnection In all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of dimission." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World In particular, 
■hows almost exclusively from quotations of prominent Woodmen, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
In the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
Joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. ' 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7%. It contains four illustrations of 
•eoret society paraphernalia. The list price is 25 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St., Chkago 



MODERN PROPHETS of BAAL 

OR 

WATCHMEN on ZION'S WALLS 

By President C. A. Blanchard. 

This is a tract especially intended for ministers. The term Baalism in referring to' 
Masonry is used figuratively. '* If we say Lord to any one who is not God, then we 
are worshipers of Baal and if we, who are religious teachers, call any one Lord 
except the true God, then we are prophets of Baal." This tract, in addition to setting 
forth the real relation of Masonic ministers to a heathen system, also gives the reasons 
why Christian preachers become prophets of Baal. 

In the appendix there is a chapter on Masonic Theology, taken from Mackey's "Masonic 
Ritualist", the author being the well known Past General Grand High Priest of the General 
Grand Chapter of the United States. There is also A Word to Bible Students, by Dean 
J. M. Gray, D. D., of the Moody Bible Institute, and there is a page of Bible quotations 
which are important in this connection. 

Thirty-two pages; Single copies three cents, per hundred, $2.00 postpaid. 



Address 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago Ills. 




R. A. TORREY, Evangelist: "I 
do not see how an intelligent, con- 
secrated Christian can belong to a 
secret order. It is an expressed 
disobedience to God's plain com- 
mand (II Cor. 6: 14). Furthermore, 
the awful mockery of the profane 
prayer in the pretended resurrection 
scene in the initiation ceremonies of 
the Master Mason degree must 
shock beyond measure any man of 
real spirituality. Some of the oaths 
in higher degrees of Masonry must 
be horrible beyond expression to 
any man possessed of genuine 
Christian sentiment." 



DWIGHT U MOODY: "Give 
them the truth anyway, and if 
they would rather leave their 
churches than their lodges the 
sooner they get out of the churches 
the better. I would rather have 

ten members who were separated from the world than a thousand such 

members." 



JOSEPH COOK: "Of all I wish to say of secret societies, this is the 
sum; Secret Oaths — (1) Can be shown, historically, to have led to crime. 

(2) Are natural sources of jealousy and just alarm to society at large. 

(3) Are especially unfavorable to harmony and mutual confidence among 
men living together under popular institutions. (4) Are dangerous to the 
general cause of civil liberty and just government. (5) Are condemned by 
the severe denunciations of many of the wisest statesmen, preachers and 
reformers. (6) Are opposed to Christian principles, especially to those 
implied in these two texts: li fn secret have I said nothing." u Be not un- 
equally yoked together with unbelievers." (7) Are forbidden to church 
members by some Christian denominations, and ought to be by all." 

JAMES M'COSH, D. D., LJv. D.: "President of Princeton, in his 
work. "Psychology; the Motive Powers," page 214, says: "I have noticed 
that those who have been trained in secret societies, collegiate or political, 
and in trades unions, * * * have their sense of right and wrong so per- 
verted that in the interests of the body with which they have identified 
themselves they will commit the most atrocious crimes, Dot only without 
compunction, but with an approving heart and with the plaudits of their 
associates." 

E. G. COOLEY, Superintendent Chicago Public Schools : "Are 
secret societies, fraternities and sororities helpful or detrimental to high 
school pupils, to the pupils of the common schools? * * * Parents should 
clearly understand that the high school 'frat' means an early and a liberal 
education in snobbishness, in loafing, in mischief and in the manipulation 
of school politics." 



JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, Sixth President of the United States: "I 
am prepared to complete the demonstration before God and man, that the 
Masonic oaths, obligations and penalties, cannot, by any possibility, be 
reconciled to the laws of morality, of Christianity, or of the land." 



Notice to Readers!— When you finis., reading this magazine place a 1-cent stamp on this notice, hand same 
any postal employee, and it will be placed in the hands of our soldiers or sailors at the front. No wrapping, 
address. A. S. BURLESON, Postmaster General. 




OFFICIAL ORGAN* NATIONAL CHRIJTIAN AJTOCIATION 
10 CENT/ A COPY EJTABLIJHED I8b8 1.00 A YEAR 



Vol. LI, No, 5. 



CHICAGO 



SEPTEMBER 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
lit the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
Maria 3, 1879. 



Religious But Not Christian 150 

Historical Sketch of Elks— The Elks 

Antler . .- 151 . 

Two Jokes 153 

Work for the Mints 153 

The Needed Word 153 

Striking Significant Facts 154 

Tendencies Lead 154 

News of Our Work : 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard 155 

Southern Agent's Report, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson 156 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 156 

The Grange 158 

Orangemen 159 

Doing Not Resolving 159 

Knights of Columbus, Advertisement 160 



CONTENTS 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 



Carpenter Building, Illustration Cover 

Deacon Philo Carpenter, Illustration 131 

Fourth Liberty Loan 132 

Moody Bible Institute 132 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 133 

Obituary : 

Rev. D. P. Baker 138 

Mary Ann Burpee Browne 139 

'The Lord's Prayer," 139 

Knights of Columbus, by Pres. C. A. 
Blanchard 140 

K. C. Pledge Unreserved Obedience 143 

Preparing for Suffrage 144 

Politics 144 

The Life of a Mormon Girl 145 

P. E. O. Historical Sketch 147 

Hit His Lodge God — The Converted Cath- 
olic Evangelist 149 

Day of Prayer for Schools 150 

Shall a Minister Join the Orders? 150 

The Elks Success — The Elks Antler 150 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. John F. Heemstra ; 
Vice-President, Rev. J. H. B. Williams ; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. F. H. Peter- 
son ; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phil- 
lips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

M. P. F. Doermann, Thomas C. Mc- 
Knight, D. S. Warner, C. A. Blanchard, 
P. A. Kittilsby, H. A. Fischer, Jr., 
George Slager, A. H. Leaman, George 
W. Bond, and J. H. Hoekstra. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St., 
New. Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96. 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

— Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 





H) 


Jesus answered 


him: I 


spake 


openly 


to the 


world, 


and in 


secret 


have I 


said nothing. 


— Joh 


n 18:20 




DEACON PHILO CARPENTER. 

The stone front building at 850 West 
Madison Street was donated by Hon. 
Philo Carpenter, of Chicago, to the Na- 
tional Christian Association, as its perma- 
nent headquarters, at a valuation of $20,- 
000. For the support of the Cynosure 
and for the carrying on of the operations 
of the Association he has contributed 
many other thousand dollars. He reck- 
oned that he had paid as much as $50,- 
000 toward this reform. 

Notwithstanding that Mr. Carpenter 
has been a life-long reformer, he kept 
himself always in fairness and sweet- 
ness of spirit as regards those whom he 
had antagonized. Prof. J. E. Roy, D. D., 
his biographer, wrote: "I never heard 
him say a harsh word about the mem- 



bers of the Chicago Presbytery, who on 
account of anti-slavery, excommunicated 
him. Nor have I ever known of his 
manifesting harshness as to those whom 
he has opposed in his anti-slavery and 
anti-Masonic career. He has always been 
ready to discriminate between good men 
in bad institutions and the bad institu- 
tions themselves ; in this respect he was 
a man of wonderful equipoise. He was 
royally loyal to the Master and His truth 
and to his own convictions of what that 
truth was. He was at the last a beau- 
tiful specimen of a man of well-rounded 
Christian character, of sweet and saintly 
spirit." 



Patriotism is in the air. We breath 
it as well as talk it. And we are in dan- 
ger of forgetting that the spiritual forces 
of a nation are what makes other forces 
worth while. Dr. J. H. Jowett, that 
famous preacher, who was recently ten- 
dered a reception at which Premier Lloyd 
George presided — Dr. Jowett said, 
"There are forces besides those which 
are supplied by munitions. The moral 
and spiritual forces of a nation are, 
after all, its mightiest equipments. If 
the morals of a people suffer, if its ideall? 
grow dim, if its spiritual vision becomes 
faint — all the munitions in the world will 
not secure its triumph; and, indeed, if 
such a nation were to snatch a victory, 
it would be devoid of ultimate worth and 
glory." 

Lodge forces are very active in secur- 
ing recruits among the soldiers, and so 
far as they are successful it means a 
moral and spiritual loss, not only to the 
individuals but to the nation. Are the 
readers of the Cynosure "doing what 
they can to warn and enlighten their 
friends and neighbors who are now in 
the army? The N. C. A. will furnish 
literature free for the soldiers where it 



132 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



is requested. Write to your Camp Pas- 
tors and urge them to be faithful to the 
bovs in this matter. 



It is said that a teacher in France required 
each of her scholars to write an essay on the 
coming of the Americans. The following 
poetic production was written by a 16 year 
old girl : 

"There is a river in France so narrow 
that you can talk across it. Birds can 
fly over with one sweep of their wings. 
Great armies are on either bank, but they 
are as far apart as the stars in the sky, 
as far as right and wrong. 

"There is a great ocean. It is so wide 
that seagulls cannot fly across it without 
rest. Upon either shore there are great 
nations. They are so close that their 
hearts touch." 



FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN. 



The campaign for the Fourth Liber- 
ty Loan will begin September 28 and 
close October 19. The result of the 
loan will be watched with keen interest 
in Europe, not only by our associates 
in the war against the Teutonic powers 
but by our enemies. It will be re- 
garded by them as a measure of the 
American people's support of the war. 

The Germans know full well the tre- 
mendous weight and significance of popu- 
lar support of the war, of the people 
at home backing up the Army in the 
field. As the loan succeeds our ene- 
mies will sorrow ; as it falls short they 
will rejoice. Every dollar subscribed will 
help and encourage the American sol- 
diers and hurt and depress the enemies 
of America. 

The loan will be a test of the loyalty 
and willingness of the people of the 
United States to make sacrifices com- 
pared with the willingness of our sol- 
diers to do their part. There must be 
and will be no failure by the people to 
measure up to the courage and devo- 
tion of our men in Europe. Many of 
them have given up their lives ; shall 
we at home withhold our money? Shall 
we spare our dollars while they spare 
not their very lives? 



000 to France, $9,000,000 to Belgium, 
and $3,000,000 to Serbia. The total of 
credits advanced to our associates in the 
war against Germany is now $6,492,040,- 
000. 



Brethren, the time is short ! the world 
is passing away. The heathen are per- 
ishing. Christians are sleeping. Satan 
is active and mighty. Oh ! shall we not 
in thought of the love of our Lord Jesus, 
in thought of the coming glory, in view 
of the coming end, and of the need of 
the Church and the world, give ourselves 
to be holy as He is holy ? 

— Andrew Murray. 



Four things a Christian should espe- 
cially labor after, viz. : to be humble and 
thankful, watchful and cheerful. — John 

Mason. 



MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE. 

Chicago has recently been honored by 
visits from two distinguished representa- 
tives of France and Great Britain, the 
Rev. Reuben Saillens, D. D. of Paris, 
who came to America to tell of his coun- 
try's sacrifices in the war, and the Rev. 
J. Stuart Holden, D. D., Vicar of St. 
Paul's, London, who was charged with 
a special mission for the British Gov- 
ernment, the nature of which was not 
publicly disclosed. Both made The 
Moody Bible Institute a kind of base 
in Chicago, addressing the faculty and 
students and giving some time each day 
to personal conversations with the latter, 
and both stirred their' audiences to the 
depths for God and country and world 
liberty and world evangelization. 



The United States Treasury has ex- 
tended additional credits of $ioo,ooo ; - 



Did Edward Livingston, Secretary of 
State under ^President Andrew Jackson 
have a double standard of morals? Read 
the letter herein to Mr. Livingston by 
Ex-President John Quincy Adams, as a 
preparation for your judgment. Mr. 
Livingston did some admirable things as 
a high public servant. Did he judge 
matters by a different standard when his 
secret order was in question? What do 
you think is the truth regarding secret 
order men in general as to a double 
standard ? 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



133 



iloljtt Qpumry Aftatttfi — &txtf)|Sr£ Hitontluttpfc £>t<it? a 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.! 

Philadelphia, 15 April, 1833. 
To Edward Livingston, Esq. 

Sir : In a former letter I stated to 
you the motives and purposes by which 
I was induced to address you, as the pre- 
siding officer of the Masonic order in 
the United States, through the medium 
of the press. They were — 

1. To defend the Antimasons of the 
United States from severe and unjust 
imputations and charges against them, 
preferred by you in your address to the 
brethren and companions of the society 
upon your installation in your high Ma- 
sonic dignity. 

2. To make, distinctly, specifically, 
and under the responsibility of my name, 
the charge against the institution of 
Freemasonry, which you in that address 
had pronounced a vile and absurd cal- 
umny, instigated by a spirit of persecu- 
tion, unjustifiable as arbitrary imprison- 
ment or the tortures of the inquisition, 
namely, that "the cause of the offense," 
that is, of the murder of William Mor- 
gan, and of a multitude of other crimes 
connected with it, was a secret tenet of 
the Masonic fraternity, consisting in the 
Entered Apprentice's oath, obligation, 
and penalty — the first rite of initiation 
in the Masonic order. 

3. To transmit to you four letters 
upon the Entered Apprentice's oath, ob- 
ligation, and penalty, published by me 
in November last, and intended to prove 
that this first rite of initiation to the 
order of Freemasonry is, in its naked 
nature, divested of mental reservation, 
stripped of the authority of great names, 



and disarmed of the shield of fraudulent 
explanation — vicious, contrary to the 
laws of God, to the laws of humanity, 
to the laws of the land. 

4. To call upon you, as the head and 
chief of the whole Masonic brotherhood 
of the United States, to sustain your 
charges against the Antimasons, — to 
vindicate the purity, the humanity, the 
lawfulness of the Entered Apprentice's 
oath, obligation, and penalty, — or to ad- 
vise and recommend to the companions 
and brethren under your jurisdiction, its 
abolition. 

This last, sir, was my principal and 
ultimate object in addressing you, — the 
abolition of that disgraceful initiatory 
act which continues the vital essence of 
Freemasonry. 

I intended and intend no disrespect to 
you. Admiring your talents, concur- 
ring in many of your political opinions, 
and believing that in the discharge of 
your official duties in the service of the 
one, confederated North American peo- 
ple, you have at a critical moment of 
their Union, contributed much to its 
preservation, by dashing from their lips 
the deadly but Circaean cup of nullifi- 
cation and secession, my confidence in 
your character has been strengthened. 
Giving you the credit of bold resistance 
to dangerous political errors, and of in- 
trepidity in the honorable undertaking 
of redeeming others from the same, I 
have been encouraged to hope that you 
will discern the pure and well-deserved 
honor which will assuredly await your 
name in after ages, if you shall avail 
yourself of that summit of Masonic dig- 
nity which you have attained, by prevail- 
ing upon the whole association to dis- 
card forever the use and administration 
of those horrible invocations of the name 
of a merciful God, as the witness to 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



promises of secrecy to things no longer 
secret to any one, under penalties of 
death in every variety of form which 
a fury could devise, or a demon could 
consummate. 

One of those oaths — that of the Royal 
Arch Companion — it is your * special 
province, as the grand high-priest of the 
order, to administer to every Most Ex- 
cellent Master, who, not satisfied with 
this superlative excellence, still pushes 
forward in search of more light, — it is 
the seventh of that series of blasphemies, 
or of calls upon the name of God in vain, 
by which the Masonic aspirant purchases 
the floods of light which pour upon him 
from every successive degree. It is in 
this degree that you turn that scene of 
awful solemnity, the calling of Moses by 
God himself in the "burning bush," into 
a theatrical representation, and actually 
make your candidate take off his shoes, 
declaring the place on which he stands 
to be holy ground. This representation 
I know is emblematic, and is explained 
by you to your candidate so to be. 

The solemnities of admission to the 
Royal Arch are deeply impressive, and 
therefore the more exceptionable by 
their mixture in the same ceremonies 
with childish fables and gross impos- 
tures. You commence with a fervent 
prayer to God ; you open the Royal Arch 
Chapter, and read to the three candi- 



*It appears from Allyn's Ritual that it 
is not the high-priest, but the principal so- 
journer of a Royal Arch Chapter, who ad- 
ministers the oath, and obligation to the 
team of candidates whom he leads by their 
halter to the altar. But the high-priest 
gravely declares to them that an old chest 
which he receives, with great surprise, from 
the principal sojourner, is the ark of the 
covenant of God. He takes out of this 
chest an old book, which upon beginning to 
read he finds to be "book of the law," long 
lost, but now found, and he solemnly de- 
clares to the candidates that "the world is 
indebted to Masonry for the preservation 
of this sacred volume." How edifying must 
this solemnity be to the ministers of the 
gospel who take part in it! 



dates for admission (for so many you 
must have) a great part of the 139th 
Psalm. You interrogate them, and bid 
them travel three successive times, and 
on their return you read portions of the 
141st, 142nd, and 143rd Psalms. You 
then order them to be conducted to the 
altar, and there you administer to them 
the Royal Arch oath. This is the oath, 
which, in many of the chapters of the 
State of New York, pledges the candi- 
date to conceal the secrets of a Royal 
Arch companion, communicated to him 
as such, — "murder and treason not ex- 
cepted." It pledges him also to assist a 
brother companion to extricate him from 
his difficulties, whether he be right or 
wrong. In other chapters the engage- 
ments are less onerous. They vary in 
almost every chapter. 

In an authentic copy of the manu- 
scripts mentioned by Col. Stone in his 
letters on Masonry and Antimasonry, 
one of the promises of this degree is to 
support, protect, and defend a Royal 
Arch Mason, even with the sword if 
necessity requires. But in whatever 
form the oath is administered, its prom- 
ises, whether more or less comprehen- 
sive or exceptionable, are all made with 
invocation of the name of God; and all 
under no less penalty than to have the 
swearer's skull smitten off, and his brains 
exposed to the scorching heat of the sun. 
This, sir, is the penalty under which you 
require of the candidate for the Royal 
Arch degree to swear that he will keep 
all the secrets of the order and of its 
companions and brethren, and that he 
will perform the other obligations ap- 
pertaining to that degree. You delib- 
erately pronounce, word by word, caus- 
ing the candidate to repeat them after 
you, the words of this oath, promise, and 
penalty, closing the adjuration, "So help 
me God, and keep me steadfast to this 
my oath of a Royal Arch Mason." And 
before he can be qualified to take upon 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



135 



himself this obligation he must have had 
six similar oaths administered to him, 
and have pledged himself to them, so 
help him God, under no less penalties 
than — 

1. To have his throat cut across from 
ear to ear, his tongue torn out by the 
roots and buried (his tongue or his body) 
in the rough sands of the sea, where the 
tide ebbs and flows twice in twenty-four 
hours. 

2. To have his left breast cut open, 
his heart torn out and cast away to be 
devoured by vultures. 

3. To have his body severed in two 
by the midst, his bowels burned to ashes, 
and scattered to the winds. 



then was the punishment inflicted upon 
William Morgan. lie was seized by 
Masonic ruffians at noonday, hurried 
away from a dependent wife and infant 
children, by a warrant upon a false 
charge of larceny, taken out thirty 
miles distant from his abode — taken out 
upon the day hallowed to the worship 
of God, — he was carried into another 
county, and discharged as innocent the 
moment he was brought to trial. Then 
forthwith arrested again for a debt of 
two dollars, imprisoned for two days, 
though he offered his coat in payment 
of the debt; finally discharged again in 
the darkness of night, by an impostor 
under the guise of friendship, and, im- 




PLACE OF MORGAN S CONFINEMENT — FORT NIAGARA. 



The three succeeding penalties are of 
the same character, equally cruel and in- 
human. 

All these penalties William Morgan 
had incurred by writing the secrets and 
mysteries of the craft for publication. 
If it were possible to concentrate upon 
one human being the torture of them all, 
the agonies of that mortal would not be 
more prolonged or more excruciating 



mediately upon issuing from the prison 
seized again, under the cover of night, 
by concerted signals, between the man- 
stealers of the lodge and of the chapter 
— gagged to stifle his cries for aid, forced 
into a coach and transported, by changes 
of horses and carriages prepared at every 
change beforehand for his reception, one 
hundred and fifty miles, there lodged in 
solitary confinement within the walls of 



136 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



an old abandoned fortress, there detained 
five days and nights, under perpetual 
threats of instant death, subject to un- 
interrupted indignity and abuse — denied 
the light of heaven in his cell, denied the 
use of a Bible, for which he earnestly 
entreated, and finally, at dead of night, 
transported by four Royal Arch com- 
panions of the avenging craft to the wide 
channel of the Niagara River, and there 
sunk to the bottom of the river. Nine 
days were occupied in the execution of 
this Masonic sentence. At least three 
hundred worthy brethren and compan- 
ions of the order were engaged as prin- 
cipals or accessories in the guilt of this 
cluster of crimes, — and this, Mr. Liv- 
ingston, is "the offense," the "cause" of 
which I aver to be the then secret tenet 
of the fraternity, the oath, the obliga- 
tion, and penalty of initiation to the mys- 
teries of the craft. 

I attribute them all to the Entered 
Apprentice's oath, because I consider 
that as the cause and parent of all the 
oaths, obligations, and penalties of all 
the subsequent degrees. My ultimate 
object in these addresses being to obtain, 
through your influence, the recommen- 
dation, the voluntary relinquishment by 
the fraternity, in this Union, of these 
oaths and penalties, I have been desirous 
of narrowing down the controversy to 
its simplest point. I ask of you, and 
through you I petition of the General 
Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the United 
States to abolish the Royal Arch oath 
and penalty; to require of all the chap- 
ters under your jurisdiction to cease 
from administering that and all other 
oaths tainted with the penalty of death, 
forever ; and this I trust and believe will 
induce the lodges to follow the example 
of the chapters, and abolish their oaths 
and penalties too, forever. 

And when I charge the Entered Ap- 
pentice's oath as the cause of the of- 
fense, — that is of the kidnapping and 



murder of William Morgan, — I only 
meet and repel your charge against the 
Antimasons, as persecutors and calumni- 
ators of your fraternity, because they 
impute that offense to that cause. But 
this is not all the offense of which I im- 
peach the Masonic penalties as the cause. 
The abduction and murder of Morgan 
are but two of a multitude of crimes 
connected with that series of transac- 
tions of which they formed a part, all 
of which I impute to the same cause. 

There were crimes committed against 
Morgan before his abduction and mur- 
der — crimes of equal atrocity committed 
against his associate, Miller, — crimes 
committed after the murder of Morgan, 
to shield, and screen, and protect, and 
aid, and abet its perpetrators, — crimes 
committed by Masonic sheriffs in re- 
turning juries, — crimes committed by 
Masonic witnesses, some in standing ob- 
stinately mute, and others in refusing to 
return true verdicts. All these I charge 
to the same cause ; and not the least 
among them is a false and calumnious 
imputation upon the character and good 
name of your own immediate predeces- 
sor, in the office of general grand high- 
priest of the Grand Royal Arch Chap- 
ter of the United States, and then gov- 
ernor of the State of New York, — an 
imputation which embittered the last 
days of his life. It must be known to 
you that one of the principal conspira- 
tors against Morgan gave out among his 
associates, to stimulate their faltering 
courage to the deed of horror, that he 
had a letter from the general grand high- 
priest declaring the Morgan manuscript 
must be suppressed, even at the cost of 
blood; that such a letter, purporting to 
by from Governor Clinton, was exhib- 
ited and that he, the governor of the 
State of New York, eminent and distin- 
guished as he had long been, was re- 
duced to the humiliating necessity of di- 
recting that an action of slander should 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



137 



be commenced to vindicate his character 
before a judicial tribunal, where Ma- 
sonic witnesses have since been sentenced 
to imprisonment for refusing to testify 
to the truth. To refute this calumny 
upon Governor Clinton was one of the 
honorable motives of Colonel Stone for 
the publication of his letters upon Ma- 
sonry and Antimasonry. He has, in my 
judgment, done it effectually; but he has 
admitted and shown that it was a calum- 
ny strictly Masonic, — a natural and con- 
genial deduction from the same oaths, 
obligations, and penalties, which sunk 
Morgan in the waters of the Niagara. 

In the address to your companions and 
brethren at your installation, which has 
been the occasion of these letters to you, 
it was said that it would be not more 
unjust and absurd to impute to the 
Christian religion all the crimes which 
have been committed in its name, than 
it is to charge the institution of Free- 
masonry with the outrages of a few mis- 
guided and infatuated members of the 
craft. This argument is familiar to all 
the defenders of Freemasonry, and has 
an appearance of plausibility ; but it is 
fallacious. 

All the crimes committed in the name 
and under color of the Christian religion, 
have been perpetrated under false and 
erroneous constructions of its precepts. 
There is nothing in the Christian religion 
to warrant them. But whenever and 
wherever those false and erroneous con- 
structions have been detected and , ex- 
posed they have been exploded. This 
is precisely the object of the Antima- 
sons at this time, with regard to the 
errors and vices of the Masonic institu- 
tion. They are to the order of Free- 
masonry what the Protestant reformers 
were to the Christian religion. Perhaps 
an analogy still more accurate may pre- 
sent itself to your mind between the let- 
ters of Blaise Pascal upon the morals of 



the order of Jesuits and those which 1 
have now the honor of addressing to you 
upon the morals of Masonry. The tenets 
which in the name of the Christian re- 
ligion have drenched the world in blood, 
were spurious; they formed no part of 
the religion itself. The tenets of the 
order of Jesuits, detected and exposed 
by Pascal, were not universally held by 
the members of that institution ; they 
formed no part of the constitution of 
the society, and were disclaimed by its 
brightest ornaments. The order of 
Jesuits was a religious community. The 
whole system of their establishment was 
founded upon the precepts of Christ. 
They read the Bible as assiduously and 
with devotion as profound and sincere, 
as animates the grand high-priest of the 
Royal Arch, upon the admission of a 
triad of candidates to that Masonic de- 
gree. And yet the order of Jesuits has 
been abolished by the head of the Cath- 
olic Church himself for holding tenets 
and adopting practices inconsistent with 
good morals. 

But the vices of the Masonic institu- 
tion are not false and erroneous con- 
structions of precepts ill understood and 
susceptible of different meanings. They 
are vices inherent in the institution it- 
self, and not corruptions foisted upon 
it. Cruel and barbarous as was the pen- 
alty inflicted upon Morgan, it was no 
more than he had at least seven times 
sworn to endure for violation of his 
Masonic oaths. His murderers, those of 
them who survive, are still worthy breth- 
ren and companions of the craft. Xot 
one of them has ever been expelled from 
Lodge, chapter, or encampment. They 
have been on the contrary, cheered W'th 
the sympathies and relieved from the 
funds of the grand lodge and grand 
chapters of Xew York. You perceive, 
then, that whatever analogy there may 
be between the crimes committed by the 
corruptions of the Christian religion, and 



138 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



those resulting from Masonry, the in- 
ferences to be drawn from it all speak 
trumpet-tongued for the abolition of the 
Masonic oaths and penalties. 

In concluding this letter I am bound 
to make my acknowledgments for a 
poetical parody of its predecessor, which 
I have seen in the newspaper called the 
Globe, and by which I see that you are 
disposed to treat the subject with pleas- 
antry. Well, sir, so be it. The Globe 
is generally considered as your political 
organ. In that country, which it is said 
you are about to visit, you may, perhaps, 
at your hours of leisure and recreation, 
occasionally frequent the first dramatic 
theater in the world, and there be enter- 
tained with exhibitions, not of Moses in 
the burning bush, but of some of the 
masterpieces of the human mind in the 
form of comedies of Moliere. You may 
chance to see, among the rest, a person- 
age upon the stage speaking to his serv- 
ant and about to give him an order, when 
the servant interrupts him by the inquiry 
whether he is speaking to his coachman 
or his cook. A similar question occurs 
to me with regard to your poet laureate. 
Is it one of your charioteers of the de- 
partment of state, or a scullion of the 
kitchen ? In either event, I commend 
this epistle to the inspiration of his 
muse; — and as for you, sir, when the 
time for seriousness shall return, and 
you shall incline to justify yourself from 
the charge of unjust accusation against 
multitudes of your fellow-citizens, or to 
vindicate from still more serious charges 
the oaths, obligations, and penalties 
which it is among your official Masonic 
functions to administer, — when you shall 
return to the grave and solemn and re- 
ligious character of the general grand 
high-priest, I shall hope to hear from 
you, in verse or prose, in the Globe or 
the Intelligencer, at your option, but in 



your own person, and with the signature 
of your name. 

I am in the meantime, 

Very respectfully, your fellow-citizen, 
John Quincy Adams. 



ifrituartj. 



REV. D. P. BAKER, 

In the early history of the National 
Christian Association one of those close- 
ly identified in its work was Rev. D. P. 
Baker, whq : was for several years a 
member of its Board of Directors. For 
many years Rev. Mr. Baker resided at 
Whittle Springs, Tennessee ; his death 
occurred July I, 1918, at his home in 
Knoxville. He has been a subscriber for 
the Cynosure all the years past and up 
to the time of his death in his 84th year. 
He became a Christian at the age of 
eighteen years and' united with the Wes- 
leyan Methodist connection and attended 
its seminary at Leoni, Michigan, for two 
years ; following this period he took 
nearly two years of study in Wheaton 
College, but was compelled to leave on 
account of failing health. He was or- 
dained an elder in the Wesleyan Meth- 
odist church in i860 and about twenty- 
five years of his life were spent in active 
ministerial work. In preaching talent, 
he was far above the average, and was 
also an able writer on theological and 
economic subjects. From 1874 to 1882 
he was Editor of The Free Methodist. 

For the last thirty-two years of his lift- 
he lived in Tennessee, coming first in 
search of health to the mountain region 
of the eastern part of the state. 

For about twenty years terminating 
with his decease, he was a member of 
the East Tennessee Conference of the 
United Brethren Church. 

He had been a member of two secret 
societies and said, "I belonged long 
enough to learn how great a power for 
evil such societies could be when in the 
hands of designing men." In opposing 
oath-bound secrecy he never dealt in 
terms of severe denunciation, but tried 
to show men that the methods and prin- 
ciples of such organizations were antag- 
onistic to the methods and principles of 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



139 



Jesus Christ. Even that kind of opposi- 
tion sometimes brought him into disad- 
vantageous circumstances. 

During an illness of two and a half 
years he suffered much and was glad to 
be released and enter in eternal rest. His 
last testimony was : "I am at peace with 
God and all men." 

The sympathy of the friends of the 
Association will go out to his widow and 
family. Mrs. D. P. Baker also has been 
a warm friend and supporter of the 
Cause, and correspondent with the Edi- 
tor for many years. Only last May she 
gave two incidents which had come un- 
der her notice of the persecution that 
follows any opposition to the Secret Em- 
pire, and said that it was her observa- 
tion that Secret Societies afforded op- 
portunity for inflicting great wrongs. 
She wrote : "A young minister in Ten- 
nessee joined the Oddfellows. He be- 
came convinced that the Order was not 
a' help to him, as a minister of the Gospel 
of Christ and therefore ceased to meet 
with them and to pay his dues. One 
day in conversing with one of his church 
members he said, 'There is nothing of 
value in the Order.' Soon he found his 
congregations at that point dwindling to 
a mere handful and his salary was with- 
held. He had spoken his honest belief 
and the Order silently but effectually 
blocked his way in that community. 

"Another minister of my acquaintance 
who had held membership in three secret 
societies said, 'I know enough of these 
Orders to feel sure that they afford op- 
portunity for much that is wrong.' ' : 



MARY ANN BURPEE. 

Mrs. Mary Ann Burpee Browne, long 
a resident of Porter, Wisconsin, and 
later of Martintown, Wisconsin, where 
she and her husband, Josiah S. Browne, 
lived earnest supporters of Christian 
work, including that against the Lodge, 
passed away December 16, 1917. She 
was 95 on May 6, 19 17. 

In the later years since the death of 
her youngest son, E. E. Browne, she 
lived with a beloved niece, Mrs. Anna 
Nixon, in Hartland, New Brunswick, 
her native land. 

Unworldly, strong in character and 
convictions, and much given to the Bible 
and prayer, she was one of the best type 



of the old-time Puritan, and was greatly 
respected and loved. She was of the 
Stickneys and Burpees, directly from 
"William Stickney, husbandman, and 
Elizabeth, his wife," who united with the 
First Church of Boston, A. D. 1638. 

She leaves a step-daughter, Mrs. Jane 
Bridge, of Brantford, Ontario; a son, 
W. Wallace Browne, lawyer, of Moun- 
tain View, California, and the next older 
son, well known to our old-time readers, 
Elder J. Franklin Browne, now in mis- 
sion work in Fayetteville, North Caro- 
lina. 

Though missing her beyond telling, 
it's only fair and right to be willing to 
have her join, after so long, the many 
beloved who awaited her, and see the 
blessed Lord she longed for. For such 
"to die is gain." 

J. Franklin Browne. 



"THE LORD'S PRAYER." 

A correspondent asks why the Masons 
use the "Lord's Prayer," which is more 
accurately described as the "Disciples' 
Prayer," if it is an unchristian order, 
and sends us the following items : 

"Masonic burial services were held 
over H. E. Cooley, a theatrical man and 
"honorary thirty-third degree Mason," 
according to The Morning Telegraph of 
August 5, 19 1 8. 

"The Masonic services were conduct- 
ed by John Lloyd Thomas, thirty-third 



degree Mason, assisted 



Reverend 



Wallace C. Petty, chaplain. 

"Beginning the solemn - Masonic ritual 
for the dead, the lodge members stood 
in lines besides the coffin, placed on a 
stand in the middle of the Grand Lodge 
Room, and after the choir had sung 
"Come Unto Me" Chaplain Wallace C. 
Petty offered prayer. Mr. John Lloyd 
Thomas then delivered an address in 
which he spoke of the many qualities of 
the deceased. 

"All those in the lodge room then 
stood and recited the Lord's Prayer in 
unison, led by the chaplain. The Masons 
then filed past the coffin for a last look 
at the face of their dead brother and as 
they filed from the room "Taps" was 
sounded. After the procession had left 
the room those in the room who were 
not Masons were permitted to gaze upon 
the dead man's face." 



140 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



The prayer taught the Disciples by 
our Lord was given before the Jewish 
dispensation ended and the Christian be- 
gan. And while it does not mention the 
name of Jesus it may be considered pres- 
ent in the "Our Father" in which he in- 
cluded himself. It is because the name 
of Christ is not mentioned in the prayer 
that Masons may use it in public, and 
this use leads persons who do not think 
things through to conclude that there- 
fore Masonry is Christian. The Lord 
Jesus Christ commanded His disciples 
to pray and ask only in His name from 
the time of the beginning of the Chris- 
tian or Church Age on to the end. 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, 

By President Blanchard of Wheaton 
College, Illinois. 

Sectarianism or denominationalism is 
one of the sins condemned in the word 
of God. The Holy Spirit says, "When 
one says T am of Paul and another, I am 
of Cephas, and another, I am of Christ' 
these Christians are carnal and walk 
as men." (i Cor. i: 12, 13). It is not 
necessary to say that this sin is a very # 
common one in our time. It is probably 
very rare that a confessing Christian 
is willing to do as much simply to get 
persons brought to Christ as he is will- 
ing to do to get them to join some par- 
ticular church of which he is a member. 

Sectarianism not only carries with it 
special interest in those who belong to 
the sect, but involves also antagonism, 
more or less pronounced, against, those 
who do not belong to that particular 
organization. This hostility varies from 
simple ill-will to deadly hatred which 
ends in persecution, murder or religious 
wars. One has only to think of the 
frightful history of the Low Lands, the 
war in which many thousands of men 
and women were executed and many 
more thousands died on field of battle, 
to feel sure of this statement. 

In our time we have passed out of the 
frightful period to which I have referred. 
It is a fair question whether people in 
general now-a-days are as deeply in- 
terested in their church organizations as 
they should be. There is a general feel- 
ing that one thing is about as good as 
another and that it really makes very 
little difference whether a person belongs 



to this church or that. This change has 
been particularly noticeable in relation to 
the age-long warfare between Roman 
Catholics and Protestants. 

The history of the Inquisition was 
written from beginning to end in blood. 
There are those who seem to believe that 
the horrors of the Inquisition were exag- 
gerated. If they do not believe this, 
they say that they do. It is without 
doubt true that instead of being exag- 
gerated, the crimes and infamies of that 
organization have never been fairly set 
before the public. The rack and stake, 
as means of correcting religious errors 
and securing fidelity to a religious or- 
ganization, can never commend them- 
selves to human beings who are hu- 
mane. 

The question may arise, does arise, 
whether it is wise to speak of those old, 
dark, bloody times. We are told that 
Protestants also have persecuted, which 
in measure is true, but all the persecu- 
tions of Protestant faith combined would 
not make a small beginning for the 
bloody record of the Romish church. 

In our time, and especially in these 
days, we are urged to a large liberality. 
Catholic chaplains in the army and navy 
are perhaps one-third of the entire num- 
ber. Christian Scientists have already 
been appointed as chaplains and several 
Mormons have also been thus honored. 
Shall we approve, disapprove, or decline 
to have opinions in respect to this sub- 
ject? Connected with the wider ques- 
tion already raised is the inquiry : What 
should be the attitude of thoughtful 
Christians and patriots respecting the 
Knights of Columbus? 

This is a secret society invented by 
Catholic priests for the purpose of satis- 
fying the desire among Catholics for a 
secret society which may aid men so- 
cially, financially and otherwise. It has 
been growing rapidly of recent years and 
already numbers hundreds of thousands 
of members. 

I personally saw twelve or fifteen hun- 
dred Catholic men and boys carrying 
arms, marching in a procession of the 
Knights of Columbus years ago in Brad- 
ford, Mass. It is claimed that during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 19 14, 
death claims amounting to $723,475 were 
paid to beneficiaries and that since the 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



141 



organization of the order, death claims 
amounting- to $7,308,682 have been paid 
by the society. On January 1, 19 14, 
there were in force 106,281 policies call- 
ing for $112,286,750. These figures in- 
dicate the rapid growth of the organiza- 
tion to which reference has been made 
above. 

When the present World War opened, 
there were two organizations which in- 
stantly attracted great public attention. 
I speak of the Young Men's Christian 
Ass'n and of the Red Cross. Both these 
organizations were old and had been 
thoroughly tried out. They had an hon- 
orable history of large work accom- 
plished for the benefit of man. It was 
obviously to the interest of the Catholic 
church that the Knights of Columbus 
should get into line on war work. They 
have done so and at the present time 
are pushing their war efforts in a very 
diligent and effective manner. In all our 
great cities, in all our great cantonments, 
the advertising of the Knights of Colum- 
bus is continually in evidence. 

This organization differs from the 
others named in that it is identified with 
a particular church. If there were 
Knights of Methodism, Knights of 
Baptism, Knights of Presbyterianism, 
Knights of Lutheranism and Knights of 
all other denominations, they would cor- 
respond in tone to the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, that is, they would be sectarian 
organizations, or if there should be a 
union of all the Protestant organizations 
and the Protestant Knights should be 
organized and push their work of re- 
lief, etc., in the name of and for the 
benefit of Protestantism, that would be 
substantially the same thing that the 
Knights of Columbus are doing. Would 
this be a helpful thing? W r ould it be 
right and proper for Protestant com- 
munions to undertake such work and for 
the government to afford facilities for 
carrying it on? These questions are 
suggested by the situation in which we 
find ourselves and ought to be fairly 
and fully considered by persons who de- 
sire to be well-informed respecting the 
age in which we live. 

Has Catholicism Changed? 

This is a fair question. If the church 
of Rome is now a humane and h 
organization, the fact that hundreds of 



years ago it was a cruel, superstitious 
and evil one ought not to be charged 
against it. A church has a right to be 
converted just as a man has and when a 
church is converted, it should be es- 
teemed according to what it is and not 
according to what it has been. There 
are those who hold that Catholicism has 
changed. They say, "Where are the 
present cruelties and persecutions which 
were common, one perhaps might say 
universal a thousand, even five hundred 
years ago?" Men call attention to the 
great Catholic universities and public 
schools and say, "If Catholicism used to 
antagonize public education, it no longer 
does so. It ought to be credited at the 
present time with the splendid provision 
which it makes for the training of child 
and youth." We must admit that if the 
premises are correct, the conclusion fol- 
lows, but are the premises correct ? Does 
the Romish church educate because it 
cares for the people or because it wishes 
to guard its own interests, secure its 
own power? 

The only method of determining this 
question, I think, will be by seeing where 
the Romish movement for popular edu- 
cation is carried on. Does the Romish 
church plant schools for the common 
people in countries where it rules su- 
preme or does it plant these schools in 
countries where Protestantism is so 
strong that the Catholic church must 
educate or else lose its constituents? 
Are there public schools in Sardinia, in 
Spain, in Austria, in South and Central 
America, in Mexico? The Catholic 
church has had power in these countries 
for hundreds of years. It has practi- 
cally unlimited power of taxation. The 
people pay what the priests demand. If 
the Romish church has a desire to fur- 
nish education to the children and youth 
of these countries, it could have had fine 
systems for popular education in force 
in every one of the countries named. 
In fact, there is not now and never has 
been in these Catholic countries any 
serious attempt made to educate the com- 
mon people. The mass of the inhabi- 
tants of these countries are today un- 
able to read and write. There is very 
little open persecution of Protestants in 
those lands. Governments have gener- 
ally deprived the Catholic church of its 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



position as an established national church 
and have required it to tolerate the pres- 
ence of Protestantism. 

No one, however, can go by the Catho- 
lic school or church, in the city and see 
the high wall which shuts in the grounds 
and reflect on the helplessness of the in- 
mates of the convents, monasteries, nun- 
neries, without wondering why, in a 
country like ours, such a provision is 
necessary. Are these high walls intend- 
ed to protect these Catholic institutions 
from assaults of outsiders or are they 
intended to render helpless those who 
are within? 

We are told, from time to time, by 
persons who have been in the Romish 
church and abandoned it, that the old 
customs of undertaking by physical pains 
and penalties, to keep people loyal to 
the church, are still in use. There is 
reason to fear that these tales are in 
large part true. If they are not, one 
of the first things which the Romish 
church is likely to do is to tear down 
these walls and open up their buildings 
to the inspection of the outside world, 
as other communions do. 

Judging candidly and without any un- 
kindly feeling toward our friends of this 
church, we must affirm that there is very 
little reason to believe that its essen- 
tial principles have been changed. Its 
dogmas still affirm the right of the 
church to civic supremacy and to govern 
the world by force. The fact that the 
church does not do this in places where 
it cannot, is not a proof that its nature 
is changed. 

The Ceremonies of the Knights. 

Studying the secret work of the order 
one finds it to correspond in a general 
way to the rituals of older secret as- 
sociations. The lodge room corresponds 
to other lodge rooms. There is an open 
space in the center. The officials sit 
around the four sides of the room, — the 
outer guard and the inner guard pre- 
venting persons from coming in who 
are not sworn to secrecy, and the altar 
stands in the middle of the room, just 
as it does in the lodge halls of other 
secret associations. The members wear 
regalias of one kind and another and are 
obligated to conceal the secret proceed- 
ings of the lodge halls from the outside 
world. 



A grip is given by which the Knight 
of Columbus is able to make himself 
known to other members of the organi- 
zations and these members are respec- 
tively obligated to mutual assistance. 

The Knights of Columbus differ from 
other secret associations in that they are 
openly and avowedly sectarian. The 
courage of its convictions is character- 
istic of the Romish church. It has al- 
ways maintained its right to be and to 
do what it is and what it pleases. It 
it not to the credit of Protestantism that 
it is sometimes much more apologetic 
than an organization which is sure of 
its foundations should be. 

The objection which the Romish 
church had to the old secret societies 
was that they interfered with the con- 
fessional. The Catholics who united 
with the Free Masons or the Odd Fel- 
lows or the Knights of Pythias, were 
encouraged to conceal the proceedings 
of their order from their priests who 
took their confession. In fact, they were 
in danger of not being very faithful to 
the confession. Thus the power of the 
church was weakened. 

The Knights of Columbus have guard- 
ed against this danger by making high 
Catholic officials ex-officio members of 
the order and by making every Catholic 
priest eligible to membership. This, of 
course, puts the organization completely 
in the power of the leaders of the 
church. It also removes the desire which 
some Catholics have for membership in 
other secret societies, having their own, 
being by it united in secret society wor- 
ship, they have less inducement to ap- 
ply for admission to older secret so- 
cieties. 

The fact that the Knights of Colum- 
bus have a plan of benefits is another 
argument to the same effect. When we 
reflect on the unquestioned power which 
the Catholic priests have and the habit 
of submission which is common to the 
Catholic laity, we see at once how nat- 
ural it is that this organization should 
have had the growth that it already has 
attained. 

The ceremonies of initiation are not 
so complicated as they are in the or- 
ders which have furnished the models 
for these Knights. There is not so 
much removing of clothing, blinding of 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



143 



eyes, etc., yet there must apparently al- 
ways be something of this kind in a se- 
cret society. So in the initiation there 
is a play which is intended to frighten 
the candidate. There are operating' 
tables in the lodge room and surgeons 
who are intended to impress the candi- 
dates with possible dangers. The mem- 
bers of the lodge stand about in gowns 
and hoods, which in the half light of 
the lodge room make them appear awe- 
some to the ignorant and frightened can- 
didates who are being taken in. As in 
other organizations, these attempts to 
scare do not probably always produce 
the desired effect. There are very likely, 
from time to time, persons who know 
that the pretence of personal injury is 
simply a pretence, — That they are not 
likely to be killed because they are in 
a lodge. At the same time there are 
probably in the Knights of Columbus, 
men of high nervous organization who 
are thoroughly frightened and who may 
die of fear or by some carelessness in 
the initiation. 

It is not to be supposed that lodges 
generally intend to kill candidates. They 
do not wish to do so, they wish the 
candidates to live, pay dues, vote for 
the members of the order, etc. This 
is the plan on which secret orders are 
conducted, but the desire to scare, which 
seems to be inherent in all lodges, very 
frequently produces fatal results. In 
cases where life is not sacrificed, some- 
times reason is. There is no justifica- 
tion for the effort to frighten, and for 
a company of men, gathered at night 
in a lodge room with means of various 
kinds in their power to scare persons 
who are being initiated and using these 
means in a way to embarrass, mortify, 
craze, or kill, is a sin against God and 
a crime against humanity. 

How Will It End? 

It will end precisely as other lodges 
will end. The Bible gives us no reason 
to hope that evil will be banished from 
this world until Satan is bound and 
Christ is enthroned. There are reasons 
for believing that that time approaches. 
The frightful confusion among the na- 
tions in this gigantic world war, the 
earthquakes, famines, floods and pesti- 
lences, which devastate large portions 
of the world, the apostasy from the faith 



of Christ on the part of multitudes who 
profess it and many who are employed 
to teach it ; the fact that the kingdom 
of God is to come when the kingdoms 
of men have proven their utter inability 
to bring about righteousness and peace ; 
by these facts which are obvious in our 
own time, we have good reason to be- 
lieve that the end is approaching. 

We are expressly forbidden to under- 
take to fix this time. Jesus said that 
men did not know when it was to be. 
If some new teacher should tomorrow 
tell us when Jesus will come and His 
kingdom be set up, we would have ev- 
ery reason to believe that whenever it 
did come, that would not be the time 
when it would appear. Nevertheless, 
Jesus is to come. Satan is to be bound. 
The kingdom of God is to come on earth. 
The will of God is to be done on earth, 
as it is in heaven. We were taught 
to pray for this day when we were little 
children. Hundreds and thousands of 
millions of people have been asking ac- 
cording to divine direction for the com- 
ing of this day. The day must come 
and it will come suddenly. When it 
comes, secret associations will be ban- 
ished b'ke all other open and shameless 
forms of sin. Satan is to be bound 
and the kingdom of Jesus Christ is to 
come. For this day we are taught to 
pray and labor, not with a fear but with 
courage and hope. 



K. C. PLEDGE UNRESERVED OBEDI- 
ENCE. 

"At a High Mass at St. Patrick's 
Cathedral, with His Eminence Cardinal 
Farley occupying the throne, Tuesday, 
August 6, which preceded the Supreme 
Convention of the Knights of Columbus, 
the Rt. Rev. William T. Russell, Bishop 
of Charleston, South Carolina, delivered 
the sermon from which we make the 
following extracts from The Columbian, 
Vol. 46, No. 33, August 16, 1918. 

"When we call to mind that at the 
time our country entered this conflict the 
Catholic Church was wholly unprepared 
for the part she must take in caring for 
the spiritual welfare of the Catholic sol- 
diers — without material, without men, 
without experience, without organiza- 
tion, and that notwithstanding this im- 
measurable handicap she is able today 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



both at home and abroad to meet the 
situation with no small degree of suc- 
cess, we have reason to celebrate a vic- 
tory. When we remember that our suc- 
cess is due almost entirely to the prompt, 
fearless, generous, and efficient action 
of the Knights of Columbus, it seems 
eminently proper that the National Con- 
vention of the Knights of Columbus 
should be the occasion for such a cele- 
bration." 

"In conclusion, let me assure you that 
we have no misgivings in respect to the 
future. Who can forget that historic 
scene when at the first meeting of the 
National Catholic War Council, your 
Grand Knight, speaking for the whole 
body of the Knights of Columbus, said 
in effect : 'We are first and always Cath- 
olics ; we pledge ourselves unreservedly 
to obey our spiritual superiors in the 
United States. Whatever is ours, the 
fruits of our thought and endeavor, is 
yours, to command.' Then while all 
kneeled, the four bishops begged God's 
blessing on the great work we had be- 
gun. God grant that this spirit of obe- 
dience and wholehearted loyalty to au- 
thority may ever animate your great 
body." 

Priestly autocracy is more to be 
dreaded in any country than Prussian 
autocracy. Implicit obedience is owed 
to God only. The surrender of our con- 
science to a human beirg is likely to be 
a fatal surrender. 



PREPARING FOR SUFFRAGE. 

The class initiation of the Ladies' 
Catholic Benevolent Association which 
took place in Boston Opera House, op- 
posite the Sunday Tabernacle, December 
31st, was the largest in the history of 
the sorority. More than 2,500 persons 
were present at the initiation of about 
1,200 new members. At the banquet 
which followed, a gold watch was pre- 
sented to the Supreme Deputy of Mas- 
sachusetts. Among those present were 
prominent Roman Catholic clergymen. 
"Supreme" officers from various cities 
of Eastern states took part in the cere- 
mony. The great success of the asso- 
ciation was publicly accredited to Card- 
inal O'Connell. The Governor of Mas- 
sachusetts was represented by a Lieuten- 
ant of his staff, who expressed the con- 



gratulations of his excellency and told of 
the appreciation of the Commonwealth. 
Thus are the authorities of the Roman 
propaganda organizing a strong force to 
fill the offices with their own incumbents 
or those outside who will be subservient ; 
and to fasten the parochial system on the 
public treasury, while bringing the pub- 
lic school system under Roman control. 
Organizing for suffrage, they are insur- 
ing preparedness. 

American. 



The Knights and Ladies of Security 
is a mutual assessment, death and disa- 
bility, beneficiary secret society, to which 
both men and women are eligible. It 
is a Kansas corporation with its head- 
quarters at Topeka, Kansas, 701 Kansas 
avenue. It was organized by Freema- 
sons and Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and, we believe, by members 
of both orders of the Woodmen. 



"Councils of Knights and Ladies of 
Security are practically private social 
clubs rather than mystic temples, but the 
ritual and ceremonial are instructive and 
attractive, being well calculated to im- 
press upon the mind of the novitiate the 
importance of wisdom, security, protec- 
tion, and fraternity." This is a state- 
ment which we quote from lodge sources. 



POLITICS. 

"For unto us a child is born, unto 
us a son is given: and the government 
shall be upon His shoulders : * * * 
Of the increase of His government and 
peace there shall be no end, upon the 
throne of David, and upon His king- 
dom to order it, and to establish it with 
judgment and with justice from hence- 
forth even forever. The zeal of the 
Lord of hosts will perform this." Isa. 
9: 6, 7. 

"It should be recognized much more 
than it is, that the Bible is a political 
Book rather than anything else ; that 
the promises and the warnings and the 
prophecies of the Old Testament, and 
in a large measure also of the New, 
are political; that Christ Himself is a 
political Character, and that religion is 
only the highest form of politics. This 
will be readily understood when we con- 
sider that the word 'politics' signifies 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



145 



the science of Government, and that it 
includes the government of the house- 
hold, of a city, of a province, of a King- 
dom, of an Empire, and finally of the 
Heavens and all they contain. God is 
therefore the greatest of all Political 
or Governing Beings, as He is the Head 
of all Power and Government, whether 
in Heaven or Earth, and that He has 
committed all power unto the Son, i. e., 
to Christ (Isa. 9 : 6, 7 ; Matt. 28: 18; 
John 5 : 22 ; Col. 2: 9, 10; Rev. 12: 
*io). The fact that men forget, ignore, 
or fail to recognize this, does not alter 
the great fact." 

What men call "natural laws" are 
simply the uniformity of God's action, 
in material and temporal affairs. "He 
alone spreadeth out the heavens * * 
* maketh Areturus, Orion and Pleia- 
des * * * doeth great things past 
finding out." Job 9: 8-10. But He also 
cares for the minutest animalculae and 
not a "sparrow falls on the ground with- 
out Him." Matt. 10 : 29. 

It is often asserted that it would be 
beneath the dignity of our Lord to at- 
tend to the politics of this world. This 
is based upon a mistaken idea of His 
divine character. His omniscience and 
omnipresence are most forcibly shown 
in the minutia of detail care. He will 
"rule the nations with a rod of iron." 
Rev. 2 : 27. And He will also care for 
all the wants of the poor and the needy. 

"In His days shall the righteous flour- 
ish * * * He shall have dominion 
also from sea to sea * * * Yea, all 
kings shall fall down before Him, all 
nations shall serve Him." Psa. 72 : 7- 
11. 

From "The Millenium," by Wm. E. 
Blackstone, Fleming H. Revell Com- 
pany, Publishers, Chicago-New York. 



THE LIFE OF A MORMON GIRL. 

My grandfather was a farmer and a 
skeptic ; he was a stern moralist, but he 
had the courage in the days of strict 
creeds and unquestioning faiths to say 
that he considered the Bible but a his- 
tory, and not altogether a reliable one. 
He had a poor opinion of King David, 
and as for Solomon — ! Yet my grand- 
father was not intolerant, and if my 
grandmother and the three girls were set 
upon going to some religious meeting he 



would take them. Had he refused to go 
on one occasion my destiny would have 
been quite different, if it had been at all. 
For it was at a religious meeting that my 
mother met my father. 

The meeting was the first of a series 
given by some young Mormons who be- 
lieved that Joseph Smith was prophet of 
God and that his revelations were from 
God. They said that the lost tribe of 
Israel had come to America, and that 
the Nephites were a people who had been 
destroyed by their enemies, the Laman- 
ites, 400 years after Christ. ( )ne man, 
Mormon, had kept a record of their his- 
tory up to that year; then his son, who 
survived, had kept a record until 420. 
Then he, Moroni, had buried it in a hill 
called Cumorah, in Ontario County, 
N. Y. Joseph Smith, they said, had 
found the book of Mormon in 1827. 

These young preachers pictured the 
promises of the book and converted some 
of the young people to the faith. It was 
quite natural that the young men should 
be tempted to follow them, for they 
aroused the pioneer spirit ; they were go- 
ing to establish the Kingdom of God on 
earth and somewhere in the mysterious, 
wonderful West ; they were promising a 
fresh world beyond the veil of faith. My 
father had always been an enthusiastic 
Methodist. It was not hard to increase 
his faith so that it could include a new 
book closely related to the Old Testa- 
ment. He had always been restless and 
eager for adventure, too. He became a 
Mormon. 

My mother was in love with him ; she 
became a Mormon, too. 

Not a word of polygamy had been 
spoken. All the emphasis was laid upon 
the necessity of establishing a Kingdom 
as it had been revealed to Joseph Smith. 
To do this it was necessary to depart, to 
go West and to respect the mandates of 
the successor of Joseph Smith — Brig- 
ham Young. If they could only have 
known of one incident in the life of that 
first prophet, the founder of the faith, 
they would never have gone as they did. 
It may be that the missionaries who were 
preaching on the edge of the river did 
not know of the incident; it is true that 
very few did know of it at all. 

There are not many today who know 
that when Joseph Smith had the revela- 



146 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



tion allowing polygamy he did not let 
his wife, Emma, know that it was his 
intention to take advantage of it. She 
was, it seems, a very beautiful and in- 
telligent woman, and had power over 
him which she never lost. When she 
confronted him with the suspicion that 
he was not true to her, that he was ten 
times false, he did not stand on his rights 
as prophet of God, but he denied that her 
suspicions were well founded. She was 
not satisfied with his denial, and he asked 
what he could do to prove he spoke the 
truth. 

"I believe you respect the Bible," she 
replied, "and if the women themselves 
will swear on the Bible that what you 
say is true, I will believe." 

Joseph Smith brought the ten women 
before Emma, and each one swore the 
truth of his protestations to his first wife. 
Yet they were his polygamous wives ; 
three of them were about to bring chil- 
dren — his children — into the world ! 
What power he used to make the ten of 
them swear to a lie no one knows. As 
an excuse he is said to have given the 
approaching maternity of Emma ; it 
would not be wise to let her worry. Ap- 
parently she believed him and brought 
up her three sons to believe she was the 
only wife. But the other three children 
were not given his name, nor the others 
that followed. What of the prophecy of 
such a man? 

But my father and mother never knew 
a word of those things when they en- 
tered into the faith and made their wed- 
ding journey a pilgrimage to the place 
where the Kingdom should be. I do not 
remember that they ever talked much of 
their journey; it took months to get to 
Council Bluffs, where the outcast Mor- 
mons of Nauvoo had gathered. There 
were stories there of martyrdom to stir 
their hearts ; there were the intensity and 
spirit of comradeship that sprung up in 
the pioneer camps. Council Bluffs was 
a haven for hundreds of Mormons. 

My mother waited there until toward 
the end of 1847. My father came back 
from the trial trip for her and took her 
across the plains, over the mountains and 
into the valley. My eyes opened in a 
little log hut at the foot of the Wasatch 
Range, a hut without floor, windows or 



doors ; buffalo skins kept out the cold 
when the winter came. 

This log cabin is not even a memory 
to me, for my father moved on to a farm 
near town before I began to have mem- 
ories. But I have been back there since 
and looked at the mountains that my 
mother must have watched, and wan- 
dered in the canons where she carried 
me while my father was at work cutting 
down trees. 

My first memory is of those moun- 
tains ; they were full of wild animals, the 
boys said, and Indians ! Yet I can re- 
member that one day I went toward 
them without fear. I held a little pail in 
one hand and clutched my mother's 
skirts with the other while I trudged 
over a dusty road mountainward. We 
were going after berries on the foothills. 
That was the first consciousness of life 
— two of us, one not much wiser than 
the other, on a dusty road, with empty 
buckets, going up the foothills. 

When I began to think and to see 
about me I was no longer the only child ; 
there were three others, a sister and two 
brothers. 

The schools, I believe, were like 
schools of other pioneer colonies ; we 
learned the usual things in the usual way ; 
it is all rather vague to me now, except 
one teacher. Many who still live in the 
Promised Land and many who have 
wandered away remember that teacher. 
She was tall and beautiful and very sad ; 
she was intense and her eyes sometimes 
frightened me, because they were on me, 
yet not seeing me. We all knew her 
story, although I do not believe we ever 
talked to each other about her; we did 
not quite dare to, because it seemed to 
us she would know if we did. 

She had left a city home in the East, 
had left two children and a husband to 
come to Utah with one of the Mormon 
missionaries ; she had not come very far 
when someone — perhaps her husband, 
perhaps her brother — had killed the mis- 
sionary. But that had not made her go 
back ; she had come right out among us 
and was set at the task of teaching chil- 
dren. 

Sometimes it seemed that we could see 
the shadows of her children sitting there 
amono; us ! She never married anyone 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



147 



else, but lived alone, one of the silent 
ones. 

In Sunday school we were taught that 
God loved us more than any other peo- 
ple, because we were the best of Hi^ 
children ; the teachers told us that the 
rest of the world were heathen who did 
not know God and that they could not 
be saved if they did not join the Church 
of the Latter-Day Saints. They told us 
that God spoke to the president of our 
great church and told him just what to 
do, and that we must respect him and do 
just as he said. Of course, we thought 
the "Gentles," the "heathen," were cruel, 
dreadful people, almost monsters, and 
we were very glad that we were going 
to be saved. We studied the Bible and 
the Book of Mormon and the Covenants. 
We had a catechism and hymns. We 
were told to be honest and gentle and 
trustful and to believe in the great 
prophet, Joseph Smith. We were taught 
these same things at home, too ; I learned 
these things as an ordinary child does; 
I was not a religious enthusiast. 

The first hint of the falsity of the 
teaching, the first rift that I discovered 
between theory and practice — although I 
did not know the meaning of those words 
— was when news came from France 
that Father Taylor, who was there on a 
mission, had said that no man in the 
State of Deseret had any more than one 
wife. I overheard my mother's indig- 
nant protest against this lie, and heard 
my father say to her: 

"We must not inquire too closely into 
these things, Sarah. Father Taylor may 
be right. He is led of God." 

This discussion roused my curiosity. 
Why should one lie to the heathen about 
the elect of God? Why should a great 
man like Mr. Taylor lie about our homes 
and the mothers? That "why" worked 
itself into my brain and I began to no- 
tice the life about me. I began then to 
hear the stories that the children some- 
times told of how two of their fathers' 
wives had quarreled and would not speak 
to each other. I remember one child 
said to another one day : "Father stays 
more with your mother than he does with 
mine, and I hate your mother !" — From 
The Independent. 

(To be continued) 



P. E. O. HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

Miss Clara Mason, principal of Park 
School and one of the prominent Omaha 
P. E. O.'s, has prepared the following 
history of the organization: 

"The P. E. O. sisterhood is one of the 
most picturesque and popular secret or- 
ganizations in the world. Its organiza- 
tion was the result of romantic friend- 
ship among young college girls and its 
remarkable growth and stability as an 
order is the wonder of social organizers 
and is evidence that the seven young 
women who, on one lovely day in Janu- 
ary, nearly fifty years ago, founded the 
society were inspired by motives not only 
of sisterly love, but of a still higher na- 
ture, which insured the success and 
growth of their new organization. 

This memorable gathering took place 
in the old music room of Iowa Wesleyan 
College on the afternoon of January 21, 
1870. Seven young women, students in 
the college, were in the last year of their 
school life. A movement had been start- 
ed among the girl students to install a 
branch society of another woman's or- 
ganization within the college circles. 

These seven young women had met 
together to discuss the question of 
whether they had better break their circle 
of seven by part of them joining this or- 
der, possessing secrets which would have 
to be kept from the others of the seven 
who had not been invited to join. Sud- 
denly one of the girls, sweet of face and 
filled with love for her companions, pro- 
posed that as a memorial of their friend- 
ship and as a means of holding them- 
selves together they themselves form a 
secret society founded entirely upon their 
ideals of friendship, love, hope, humanity 
and philanthropy. 

There was a moment's silence, then in- 
stant acquiescence, and, already drawn 
closer together by the new tie, these seven 
original "pliades" of what was to become 
a nation-wide secret organization assent- 
ed to the proposition of Hatty Briggs, 
and immediately Alice Bird, the clever 
and intellectual genius of the seven, was 
asked to prepare a constitution for the 
order. She consented, and produced a 
code of rules which still form the basis 
for the society's government. She also 
formulated the oath which is still used 
at initiation of members. At a subse- 



m 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



quent meeting of the seven young women 
Miss Bird read the constitution and oath 
which she had prepared, and they were 
adopted. Then one of the young women 
read the oath to Miss Bird, thus initiat- 
ing her the first member of the new or- 
der. Miss Bird in turn read the oath to 
the other six, completing the original or- 
ganization. These seven charter mem- 
bers called their society "P. E. O." The 
letters are mystic. None save the duly 
initiated and obligated members knows 
their meaning. Little did these young 
women dream that their small society 
would ever reach the bounds to which it 
has now spread. Starting with the orig- 
inal seven, in the beautiful old "Athens 
of Iowa," this order now pervades every 
part of the United States and numbers 
hundreds of chapters and thousands of 
members. The growth of the organiza- 
tion is due entirely to the spirit which 
led to its conception and permeates its 
rules and regulations. The aim of the 
organization was for something earnest 
and broad, something more than a mere 
college fraternity. Their society stood 
to them as a symbol of what was noble 
and lovely and desirable in their life 
together and their purpose was to pre- 
serve and strengthen it. 

As a fitting badge for their society of 
high ideals they chose a golden five- 
pointed star with the letters "P. E. O." 
in black enamel across the face. At the 
first meeting three new members were 
voted in and the society took to itself the 
name of Chapter A. 

At intervals new chapters were formed 
by delegates from the original chapter 
and in 1883 a supreme chapter was 
formed, consisting of delegates from lo- 
cal chapters and being invested with leg- 
islative and judicial powers over the sub- 
ordinate chapters. 

P. E. O. is a sisterhood, not a club 
nor a sorority. The order, notwithstand- 
ing its origin, is non-sectarian. The 
flower is the marguerite, the emblem the 
five-pointed star, so often observed with 
curiosity and respect. P. E. O. is the. 
only national sisterhood independent of 
an associated fraternity. It rests on 
neither a money basis or sectarian sup- 
port and is absolutely unprecedented in 
its secret action. The educational fund 
of the order is remarkable. Each year 



every chapter contributes to it. This en- 
tire fund is loaned to worthy girls seek- 
ing an opportunity to complete their ed- 
ucation. A girl does not have to be a 
P. E. O. or even a relative of a P. E. O. 
to be eligible to the waiting list. The 
only security taken is a promissory note 
due in five years. — The Omaha Bee, 
Sept. 23d, 1917. 

The Scriptures place all sin under one 
of three heads. The desire to get some- 
thing in a manner contrary to God's will 
is one class. The example of Christ 
Jesus (Jno. 18:20) ; His command 
(Matt. 5:16) and the commands of the 
Holy Spirit (2 Cor. 6:14) clearly teach 
that the P. E. O. is not seeking things in 
God's way. "Wherefore come ye out 
from among them." 



HIT HIS LODGE GOD. 

"Ephraim is joined to idols; let him 
alone/'— Hosea 4:17. 

Toledo, Ohio. 
Mr. L. J. King : 

Dear Sir : — Noticing that you continue 
sending me your magazine, I had hoped 
that you would discontinue it ere this 
day, but it seems that you are determined 
to send it on. Now, Sir, I have no 
further desire for the said Magazine, 
and my reasons are simply these : That 
you continuously abuse the Secret Or- 
ders. I have been a Oddfellow for 
thirty-eight years, and I see nothing 
therein to be criticized as I understand 
it. We Oddfellows take care of the sick 
and bury the dead. Does any church 
do as much? I for one must say, "Nay." 
Of course I will acknowledge that there 
is not a direct spiritual teaching therein, 
but we are taught to believe in the Bible, 
and you cannot build up a church wholly 
your way of thinking, that will not draw 
the people to your teachings, that is my 
conclusion. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed) J. Holliger. 



My Dear Mr. Holliger :— May the 
Lord bless you and open your blinded 
eyes to see the glorious light of the Gos- 
pel of Jesus Christ, and then you won't 
need a secret order, but you will be an 
oddfellow for Jesus. We had no word 
from you to discontinue the Magazine. 
We do not seek to abuse the Secret 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



149 



Orders. We simply try to tell you that 
they are unscriptural, and forbidden by 
the Word of God. And there is no 
good in them. The Secret Lodges are 
rilled up with infidels, Christ-rejecting 
Jews, Sabbath breakers, tobacco smokers 
and card players, and blasphemers and 
unconverted people, whisky drinkers and 
all kinds of unclean people, both men 
and women. The whole thing is anti- 
Christ. And it's the business of every 
saved man and woman, both in the pew 
as well as in the pulpit, to warn people 
to stay out of such a trap of the devil, 
and to call those who are in the trap to 
come out of it, and put their trust in the 
Lord God Almighty, who is able to save 
to the uttermost and to keep saved, all 
them that come unto God by Him. There 
are some good people in the lodges (they 
are good in spite of the lodge), and some 
are doing good deeds, but they are de- 
ceived, and we want them to know that 
there is something better for them, to be 
a free love-slave for Jesus' sake" and the 
sake of lost, outcast humanity is ten 
million times better than to be a bond- 
slave to the dictates of man in the 
Secret Orders. 

You say you have been an Oddfellow 
for thirty-eight years. Had you been a 
Bible Christian for that length of time, 
serving the Lord instead of the Lodge, 
you would have fed the poor, visited the 
sick and done the things the Lodge com- 
pels you to do, prompted by the Spirit 
of Christ, to the glory of God, and your 
reward in heaven would have been great, 
no doubt. Your time and money would 
have been spent in the Church of the 
Living God, the only institution God 
ever gave for the salvation of the world 
and the building up of the Kingdom of 
God here upon earth. If you become a 
follower of Jesus Christ you will do the 
good works you say the Lodge is doing, 
and there will be no need of the Lodge. 



*r ■¥• ^ *i^ *|* 



Jesus said, "Let the dead bury the 
dead." The lodge is a dead institution, 
spiritually, and her business is to bury 
the dead. But we who have been made 
alive unto God by the Holy Spirit, our 
business is to go carry the message of 
Salvation to the lost. 

You say there is no spiritual teaching 
ill the lodge. Then why stay in such a 



thing? What will all your time, money 
and service you have rendered in it 
amount to in the last day ? What good 
will it all do you when you come to face 
God upon the throne? If it does not fit 
your soul for an Eternity with God in 
heaven, what are you in the thing for? 
What are you here for but to make ready 
to meet Him and live here for His glory, 
and spend an eternity with Him? Did 
you. ever hear your lodge preach, ''You 
must be born again"? Did you ever see 
a soul get the "New Birth" in a lodge 
room? Did you ever read in your Bible 
where Jesus said, "In secret have I said 
nothing," and again where it says, ''Come 
out from among them, touch not the 
unclean thing, be ye separate, and I will 
receive you unto myself and you shall 
be my sons and daughters, saith the 
Lord Almighty?" 

Jesus said, "You shall know the truth 
and the truth shall make you free." The 
writer was caught in two of these devil- 
man-made lodge traps at one time, but 
the truth has made him free, for which 
I praise Him. 

My dear, aged Brother Holliger, you 
will need something more than a Lodge 
profession in the article of death ; when 
all around you is fading and passing out 
of your sight, you will need more than 
the prayers of a tobacco-using chaplain 
repeated over you, and a nice cock- 
plumed hat and gold-braided dress, and 
a big lodge funeral with bands of music. 
You will need a change of heart, the 
Blood of .Jesus Christ and the Holy 
Ghost to see you through into the awful 
unchangeable eternity we are all fast 
hastening to. 

In that awful day we will one and all 
need the righteousness of Jesus Christ. 
God bless you and save your poor blind, 
deceived soul, is my prayer. Your lodge 
bed is too narrow and too short, and 
your covering is no good. 

"For the bed is shorter than that a 
man can stretch hi nisei f on it; and the 
covering narrower than that lie can wrap 
himself i)i it." — Isaiah 38:20. 

— The Converted Catholic Evangelist. 



Man cannot be saved by perfect obe- 
dience, because he cannot render it ; he 
cannot be saved by imperfect obedience, 
because God will not accept it. — Selected. 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



DAY OF PRAYER FOR SCHOOLS. 

In keeping with its annual custom, the 
National Reform Association again of- 
fers to all pastors this year who will dis- 
cuss the subject of public education in 
their pulpits on the Second Lord's Day 
of September — the Day of Prayer for 
Schools — or a contiguous Sabbath, ap- 
propriate literature, free of charge. This 
literature is in advocacy of the training 
of our youth in Christian morality and 
consists of suggestive outlines for ser- 
mons, up-to-date editorial and complete 
program for the proper observance of 
the day. Address, National Reform As- 
sociation, 602-604 Publication Building, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SHALL A MINISTER JOIN THE 
ORDERS? 

Yes, if he wants to. It will at least bring 
him among the men of his community, where 
he belongs. These orders are mostly whole- 
some in their influence and Christian in spirit, 
some of them valuable coadjuncts of the 
church. If a fraternal organization, or club, 
is a good place for the men of his church, 
it cannot be an objectionable place for the 
minister himself. If he would feel uncom- 
fortable in its assemblies, he had better fight 
to keep his men out of it. The trouble is 
that too many ministers join these things and 
then never attend their meetings or interest 
themselves in their work. If a minister goes 
into them, moreover, simply to gain popu- 
larity and a following, his object, being very 
patent, will be defeated, and he will find him- 
self unwelcome, an intruder. — From a con- 
tribution to a religious paper. 

Pondering this paragraph in the quiet 
of his room, one can hardly help won- 
dering whether its author wrote it out 
of some exceptionally favorable experi- 
ence, or out of his inexperience. He 
tells the reader what "the trouble is," 
but omits the reason for it. Why "many 
ministers" who have been initiated, 
"never attend" lodge meetings; and 
why they never "interest themselves" in 
lodge work; he treats like secret mys- 
teries he must not reveal — or at least 
he leaves the trouble unexplained. Has 
he ever talked with them about the 
trouble ? Perhaps he would not approve 
our supplying any part of what he omits, 
but we will venture a word. "I went a 
few times, and then I told them, life is 
too short,' " said our friend, whom we 
had known as a New York pastor and 
a lecturer. "My father-in-law left the 
lodge to save himself from a drunkard's 



grave," said another Mason and for- 
mer New York pastor. When he could 
not deny that he had been in the lodge 
a minister explained, "They say, 'once a 
Mason, always a Mason,' " then added, 
"I wouldn't be a minister and a Mason." 
It is obvious, that, like the minister who 
asked him, and like others, he had per- 
ceived the lodge to be an "objectionable 
place for the minister." 



THE ELKS SUCCESS. 

"The success of the Order of Elks 
has been due, more than all else, to three 
features — the 'Eleven O'clock Toast,' 
the 'Memorial Service' and the 'Funeral 
Ritual.' These are the outward expres- 
sions of the inward sentiments which 
have established the Elks as an organiza- 
tion of 'love and memory.' 

"The 'Eleven O'Clock Toast' was in- 
troduced into the Order by George F. 
McDonald. It was he also who con- 
ceived the idea of making the 'Jolly 
Corks' the benevolent and fraternal 
Order of Elks, and who wrote most of 
the first ritual. The first 'Lodge of 
Sorrow' was held on March 20, 1870. 

"Henry P. O'Neil, initiated in 1869, 
and fifth Grand Exalted Ruler, was re- 
sponsible for the burial service." 

— Extracts from The Elks Antler, 
Vol. 33, No. 9, Mar., 1918. 



RELIGIOUS BUT NOT CHRISTIAN. 



2000 Mourn for Dead Elks. 

Taken from The Register and Leader 
of Dec. 6, Des Moines, la. 

"The services honored the memory of 
eight members of Des Moines (Iowa) 
Lodge No. 98, who had died during the 
year. 

"A program of music with a selected 
choir led by Dean of Highland Park 
College made up most of the sacred 
session. The address of the afternoon 
was delivered by Gov. George W. 
Clarke. The Coliseum was decorated 
with palms and smilax, flowers and flags 
and with symbolic emblems of the Or- 
der. Charles Guth, exalted ruler, pre- 
sided over the ceremonies, which were 
ritualistic in character. 

Tapers for Lives Go Out. 

"The program opened with the sing- 
ing of "Abide With Me" by the choir 
and 'Hark! Hark! My Soul,' sung by 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



151 



Mrs. Ryan and Mrs. Shank, supported 
by the choir. 

''Eight tapers, symbolic of the lives of 
the departed brothers were extinguished 
as their names were pronounced in the 
roll call by the secretary. 

"Mrs. De Graff sang 'Oh, Divine Re- 
deemer,' Rev. A. B. Learner of St. 
John's Lutheran Church delivered a 
prayer, and the choir sang Gottschalk's 
'Mercy.' 

"Responses as to the duty of the of- 
ficers were made to interrogations by 
Mr. Guth and the members all rose and 
stood giving the sign of grief while the 
supplication was offered by the chaplain. 
The Schubert- Welhelmj Ave Marie was 
played and Miss Binkley and the male 
choir sang Mendelssohn's 'The Lord 
Hath Commanded Me.' 

"The program closed with the singing 
of 'God Shall Wipe Away All My 
Tears' and the pronouncing of the bene- 
diction by Rev. A. B. Learner." 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF ELKS. 

In the Fall of 1867 an English comic 
singer, Charles A. Vivian by name, 
landed in New York from his native 
shores and dropped into the Star Hotel, 
a "Free and Easy," kept by John Ire- 
land at Lispenard Street, near Broad- 
way. The old-time "Free and Easy" 
was a thoroughly respectable institution 
in spite of the looseness of its name. 
Steaks, chops, rarebits and ale were its 
specialties and the patrons were enter- 
tained with songs and stories furnished 
by paid and amateur performers. The 
style of entertainment, a modest version 
of the cabaret of to-day, was patterned 
after a popular English institution of 
the day. 

Richard R. Stierley played the piano 
at the Star Hotel and Chas. A. Vivian, 
striking up an acquaintance with him, 
volunteered to sing a few songs. He was 
given a "try-out" and then engaged as 
one of the professionals. At the conclu- 
sion of the evening's work, Bro. Stier- 
ley brought Bro. Vivian around to a pro- 
fessional boarding-house kept by a Mrs. 
Geisman at 188 Elm Street. There Bro. 
Vivian fell in with a number of choice 
spirits, including Bro. William Lloyd 



Bowron, afterwards "Number One of 
Number One," whom he had known in 
his native land. Bro. Vivian introduced 
the party to a trick which had been used 
with great success for treating purposes 
on the other side. It consisted of drop- 
ping a cork at a word of command, the 
last cork down was called upon to settle 
for the round. The initiates held their 
cork, while the novitiate was usually in 
a hurry to get his down first, thereby il- 
lustrating that the "last shall be the first 
and the first last." This innocuous and 
highly delectable form of diversion sug- 
gested the title "J°Uy Corks" and the 
little coterie that stopped at Mrs. Geis- 
man's formally organized with Charles 
A. Vivian as "Imperial Cork." 

At the time of the formation of the 
Jolly Corks the Excise law was strictly 
enforced in New York City. Sunday 
therefore was a "dry" day, and the 
"Corks" were wont to congregate at Mrs. 
Geisman's for the purpose of holding 
social communion under the inspiring in- 
fluence of barley brew. Whether it was 
the good lady who kept the boarding- 
house or the neighbors who objected to 
the disturbance created in the staid pre- 
cincts of Elm Street, by the revels of 
the jolly crew, the record does not sav, 
but after several meetings the "Corks" 
were requested to forego their Sunday 
gatherings at Mrs. Geisman's. Quar- 
ters were then found at 17 Delancey 
Street, over the saloon of Paul Som- 
mers. At this time the objects of the 
"Corks" were entirely convivial and the 
personnel Bohemian and theatrical. The 
badge of membership was a cork and 
the only dues were a pro rata assess- 
ment for refreshments purchased the 
Saturday before. 

Among those attracted to the Corks 
were members of the theatrical profes- 
sion. Leaving the Corks one night one 
said, "This thing is better than a mere 
jolly crowd, and cue day will amount 
to something," and another evidenced 
his faith in the future of the associa- 
tion by offering a motion that it organ- 
ize as a lodge along benevolent and fra- 
ternal lines and that a committee be ap- 
pointed to formulate rules and regula- 
tions for its government, prepare a suit- 
able ritual and select a new name. This 
committee consisted of Charles A. Yiv- 



152 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



ian. Vivian was ex-officio a member, 
and had the appointing power. 

On February 6th, 1868, following the 
committee's report, the name was 
changed to the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. At the reorganiza- 
tion which transformed the Jolly Corks 
into the Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks, on February 16, 1868, the 
following officers were elected : 

James W. Glenn, Third Assistant 
Prio. 

William Carleton, Recording Secre- 
tary. 

Henry Vandermark, Treasurer. 

William Sheppard, Tiler. 

At the meeting held on June 17, 1868, 
a breach which had sprung up between 
two factions within the Order, had as- 
sumed the character of a feud. On one 
hand was a strictly professional element 
which believed in the Order's future as 
a benevolent institution, while on the 
other were the semi-professionals who 
were more in sympathy with the convivial 
purpose of the Jolly Corks. Charles A. 
Vivian was the leader of the latter and 
when he appeared for his second degree 
on June 4, 1868, the professionals who 
were in command ordered a ballot and 
he was rejected. At the same time the 
password was changed and a number 
of Vivian's friends were barred from the 
meeting, and afterwards declared ex- 
pelled. This incident ended Bro. Viv- 
ian's connection with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

There is no doubt that the proceed- 
ings of this meeting, June 14th, were il- 
legal and unjust, but it may be said in 
extenuation of those responsible that 
they were moved by a desire to elimi- 
nate an element which they felt was not 
in sympathy with the standards by which 
it was hoped to build the Order's, fu- 
ture. Some of the brothers expelled at 
that time returned to the Order and be- 
came honored members of the lodges 
with which they were affiliated and re- 
spected citizens of their communities, 
and it is safe to say that none of them 
realized at the time of their differences 
with the Elks the import of the new or- 
ganization or of the wonderful destiny 
it was to fulfill. 

In reference to the founding of the 
Grand Lodge "After several prelimi- 



nary meetings a charter was obtained 
from the Legislature of the State of 
New York, on March 10, 1871, which 
was immediately signed by Governor 
John T. Hoffman, incorporating ^ the 
Grand Lodge of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, New York, with 
power to issue charters to subordinate 
lodges throughout the country. Accord- 
ingly the Grand Lodge thus legally con- 
stituted issued a charter, the same day, to 
New York Lodge No. 1. This date, there- 
fore, marks the legal commencement of 
the Grand Lodge of the B. P. O. E, and 
also the beginning of New York No. 1 
under its distinctive title conferred by a 
charter issued by the Grand Lodge. 

The administration of John J. Spies, 
1 888- 1 892 is a turning point in the ca- 
reer of the Order. Previous to 1889 
the Grand Lodge operated under a char- 
ter granted by the State of New York 
and held all its meetings in New York 
State. In that year it was decided to 
hold the next convention in the city of 
Cleveland, Ohio. New York Lodge ap- 
plied for an injunction restraining the 
Grand Lodge from meeting outside of 
the State where it was incorporated. The 
injunction was granted, but the Grand 
Lodge met in Cleveland in spite of the 
Court decree. New York Lodge, held 
upon the date fixed for the Cleveland 
meeting, a Grand Lodge composed of 
the legal quorum of Grand Lodge mem- 
bers and suspended all lodges, disobeying 
its edict. The Cleveland Grand Lodge re- 
turned the compliment by suspending 
New York Lodge No.' 1. 

In 1892 the Exalted Ruler set out to 
bring bring about a reconciliation. In 
response to an invitation of the Board 
of Grand Trustees a committee of New 
York lodge met with the Board on May 
21st, 1893, in the lodge room of No. 
1 and pledged its allegiance to the Grand 
Lodge of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks of the United States 
of America, thus reuniting the entire 
Order. 

In 191 1 the Elks Home at 108- 116 
West 43rd Street was completed and 
dedicated and there Number One is per- 
manently installed. Today its building 
and property are valued at $1,250,- 
000.00. 

Compiled chiefly from The Elks An- 
tler, Vol. 23, No. 9, March, 19 18. 



September, 1018 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



153 



TWO JOKES. 

"Information from Palestine is that 
since the occupation of the J loly Land 
by the British, many relics of the an- 
cient past have been unearthed and that 
many more are expected to be discov- 
ered. 

Among other articles found is the 
sling with which David killed Goliath. 
It is said that it is a little thing, con- 
siderably out of repair, the strings be- 
ing both gone, the leather all rotted away, 
but the hole is still left." 



"Masonry, especially Knight Tem- 
plary, the world around, is thrilled to- 
day that Jerusalem, the Holy City, has 
been emancipated to Christendom, and 
the Twentieth Century Crusade, under 
British arms, has proved successful. 
From the time of Hugh de Payen, first 
grand master of the Order of the 
Temple, to Jacques de Molay, the last, 
martyred for his faith by a jealous 
church, Knights Templars had taken ac- 
tive and unusually leading parts in the 
successive Crusades to Jerusalem and 
the Holy Land from Europe. From the 
days of chivalry until today, members 
of the Masonic Fraternity have ever 
been active in any measure promising 
emancipation in any degree to the city 
of David and Solomon. Today, Masons 
everywhere, are joining in the great 
pean of praise arising because the city 
of the first grand master is redeemed 
from Mohammedan misrule and the 
shadow of the Turk/' 



WORK OF THE MINTS. 
714,139,119 new coins, with a value 
of $43^96,895, were made during the 
fiscal year ending June 30 last, which 
breaks all previous records. The mints 
worked on a 24-hour-a-day basis most 
of die year. Over 500,000,000 cent 
pieces, nearly 83,000,000 nickels, 24,- 
000,000 half dollars, 45,000.000 quarters 
and 116,000,000 dimes were coined. 



To a very large proportion of the 
members of all American churches 
prayer is meaningless. 



THE NEEDED WORD. 

Something that has needed to be said 
has at length been forcibly said by that 
strong and outspoken paper, The Watch- 
man-Exafniner, on its page of "Editorial 
Comments on Current Events." The 
editor will not complain of its being bor- 
rowed in order to secure additional cir- 
culation. There is no way to estimate 
the anxiety these cards and letters may 
have caused ; but that the risk is real is 
proved by the case of a widow who con- 
ferred with us when her little boy was 
begging her to obey the requirement of 
the message that terrified him. The 
chain seems liable to appeal to the joiner 
type of mind, not only because its vague 
association with a vast network of fra- 
ternal nines may appeal to superstitious 
feeling, but also because the prayer is 
characterized by the magic word "an- 
cient." , The following is the "editorial 
comment" thereon : 

"The prayer chain has become familiar 
to most of our readers. Many of them 
have during the last few years received 
a copy of a prayer with the request to 
copy it and send it to nine others. The 
prayer contains nothing remarkable, and 
is unobjectionable in itself. The objec- 
tionable feature is the threat that if the 
nine copies are not sent some dire dis- 
aster will befall the one neglecting to 
send them, and if they are sent some 
happiness will come. This is an appeal 
to pure superstition, and a sacriligious 
assumption of the prerogatives of God, 
who alone can bestow or withhold spirit- 
ual blessings. It is thought that mil- 
lions of dollars have been spent in cir- 
culation of this prayer by those who 
acted under a superstitious fear of the 
threat for neglect. The first nine costs 
eighteen cents for postage, the second, 
$1.62, the third, $14.58, and so on until 
the fifth round costs $10,628.82, and the 
sixth, $9,659.38, and the eighth, more 
than $5,000,000. Xo one knows how 
this strange superstition began, but every 
Christian ought to aid in stopping it. We 
believe profoundly in devout prayer, but 
not under threat from any human being.'' 



Only 40 per cent, of our Sunday school 
pupils join the church. 



If we would not fall into things un- 
lawful, we must sometimes deny our- 
selves in those that are lawful. — John 

Mason. 



154 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



STRIKING, SIGNIFICANT FACTS. 

We borrow the words to form this 
heading, from the first line and the last 
one of the paragraph that we quote, 
herewith, from The Watchman-Exam- 
iner of June 27; and we do this in order 
to emphasize intensity of surprise, novel- 
ty and breadth of alteration, and long 
antecedent need of this belated reform, 
which such a paragraph distinctly indi- 
cates. 

"It is a striking fact in connection with the 
rapid advance of the total abstinence princi- 
ple in this country, that many of the fra- 
ternal orders that have been supposed to be 
more or less convivial in their inclinations 
and habits are putting the ban on the use of 
liquors at their meeting places. More than 
100 of the 145 temples of Shriners in the 
United States have already taken such action ; 
and a great part of the 1,200 or more lodges 
of Elks in the country have, of their own 
accord, banished liquors from their lodge 
rooms. The Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company, of Boston, has just celebrated 
its first "dry" banquet in almost three cen- 
turies. These facts are of great significance." 



TENDENCIES LEAD. 

A letter written in New Haven to the 
editor of a newspaper in an adjacent 
state, though it relates to "The war upon 
drink" yet contains a remark applicable 
to the war on religion and virtue in 
which we are enlisted on the defensive 
side. The remark itself is this : "Prof. 
William G. Sumner of Yale used to say 
to his classes, 'Young men, remember 
this — things follow their tendencies.' " 
This is more evident because it is tenden- 
cies which embody principles and bring 
them out into visible form. Illustration 
of the need of such an admonition as 
was given to the young men in New 
Haven, is afforded by the way tendencies 
lead men and things everywhere, when 
the tendencies work out through secret 
orders. Things follow secret society ten- 
dencies on the lines of debauched social 
character, religious unfaithfulness, and 
political or judicial untrustworthiness. 
Wherever inherent tendencies are fol- 
lowed into debasement of personal char- 
acter, all evil accompanies that deterior- 
ation. 

Things Follow Their Tendencies. 

It will not do to judge tendencies on 
no other basis than the hackneyed say- 
ings of imperfectly qualified partisans. 
Those discoverable, or even formulated 



society principles which are active agents 
of tendencies, are sure to operate. They 
must not escape attention. Once they 
are detected and their resulting tenden- 
cies are discerned, Professor Sumner's 
admonition needs hardly any variation in 
terms in order to bear the distinct form 
of a solemn warning against secret or- 
ders. 



i£eto£ of 0\xx 



The Pen and fhe Press : Blessed alli- 
ance ! combined. 
To soften the heart and enlighten the 

mind ; 
For that to the treasures of knowledge 

gave birth, 
And this sent them forth to the ends of 

the earth ; 
Their battles for truth were triumphant, 

indeed, 
And the rod of the tyrant was snapped 

like a reed; 
They were made to exalt us, to teach us, 

to bless 
Those invincible brothers — the Pen and 

the Press. 

—Prince. 



We have heretofore advised you of 
the special burden under which the 
Cynosure labors, because of the great 
increase in cost of printing, and paper, 
and binding; and also because the gov- 
ernment has by a new law added to our 
postage rates a greater amount than is 
paid by other religious magazines. Un- 
der God the friends have maintained this 
magazine for fifty years and it is not 
probable that you are going to fail to 
come to its aid at this time of special 
stress. If each man would send one or 
more annual subscriptions so that our 
list may be doubled, the proportionate 
cost of each one would be lessened and 
we shall be able to triumph over con- 
ditions made specially burdensome, 
whether by reason of the war or of the 
enemies of our work. Send the Cyno- 
sure to your friend in the army, to your 
pastor, to some Christian who will make 
good use of the light which the Cyno- 
sure is constantly shedding upon lodge 
darkness. Let us hear from you. 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



15* 



For right is right, since God is God, 
And right the day must win ; 

To doubt would be disloyalty, 
To falter would be sin. — Sel. 



The optimist believes his ideals are 
only attainable by indomitable struggles 
and never ending patience, but that so 
much are they to be desired that every 
effort toward them is life giving, and 
every real advantage, however gradual, 
is worth while. — Ex-Preisdent Taft. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

By Rev. W. B. Stoddard. 

This seventeenth of August finds me 
at work in the Cumberland Valley, Penn- 
sylvania. I am writing at the home of 
our good friend J. K. Lenher of Mer- 
cersburg, who tells me he has been a 
Cynosure reader for twenty-one years. 
He is naturally glad to meet a N. C. A. 
representative, and become better ac- 
quainted with the work which has al- 
ways had his approval. The knowledge 
that I have been able to help him to 
help others is cheering. He is one of 
the many God has helped me to help. 
I continued for some time after my last 
report in the Ohio state work. My 
meeting on Sabbath at the Barberton 
Wesleyan Methodist Church awakened 
such an interest that a second meeting 
was requested for Monday evening. Al- 
though weather was exceedingly warm 
the attendance was large. An offering 
of $11.44 was given. The meeting held 
in the Bethel Mennonite Church near 
Wadsworth, Ohio, added to the good 
meetings of other years held at that 
place. Here we missed some good friends 
gone to their eternal reward, but found 
others willing to do their part in help- 
ing as best they could. Did space al- 
low I should mention some who were 
especially helpful. God knows, and will 
reward. In passing I stopped over night 
at the "Old Folks Home" near Marshall- 
ville, Ohio, and learned of the sudden 
passing of our good friend Jesse Good, 
to his heavenly rest. I have been en- 
tertained by him, and his good wife, 
who preceded him about six months to 
the better world, many times in the old 
home at Orrville, Ohio. They were a 
humble, faithful couple who rejoiced in 



doing the will of the Master. A meet- 
ing at the Salem Mennonite Church not 
far from Orrville was not so largely at- 
tended. Our friends at this place were 
very helpful. Because of the special 
kindness of Rev. A. W. Sommer of Dal- 
ton, I was enabled to see many, and do 
effective work. The Cause was sus- 
tained as usual at Weilersville, and 
Smithville, Ohio. The cultivation of the 
years gone by helped in our harvest at 
these points. Owing to new work I 
was not able to reach friends in Logan 
County and about Bluffton, Ohio, much 
to my regret. En-route for home I 
passed through Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and noted decorations to welcome the 
F. O. E. that was coming to town. The 
saloons had many decorations. Of 
course they knew their friends. The 
Dispatch in reporting the action of the 
city council stated "employment of prob- 
ably eighteen out-of-town detectives for 
protection of citizens and delegates dur- 
ing the convention here next week of 
the Eagles was approved." Had there 
been a gathering of Christians such an 
arrangement would have been most sur- 
prising. Evidently the city council was 
acquainted with this F. O. E. 

Last Sabbath I was privileged to speak 
in churches of the Brethren at and near 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. At the 
Rhodes Grove Radical United Brethren 
Camp grounds I was made welcome as 
in other years and given opportunity 
to speak. Brethren Plumley and Brown 
were in charge of the evangelistic and 
music services. Interest was good at 
the beginning and expected to increase 
toward the end of the two weeks this 
meeting was to be held. There were 
two conversions at meetings in which 
your representative participated. "Drop 
in" meetings on Reservoir Hill, Cham- 
bersburg, and Green Village, Pennsyl- 
vania, gave opportunity to address 
friends of the Brethren in Christ in con- 
nection with their prayer meetings. The 
good attendance of young as well as 
of the older at these meetings would 
indicate a good spiritual condition. Many 
spoke of receiving desired help. I am 
not sure about services tomorrow. A 
friend takes me to the country where 
I hope to find an open door in a friendly 



156 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



church. I must often move by faith in 
putting forth my efforts to enter the 
doors which Providence opens. I need 
not write of trials. In common with all 
humanity I have plenty. Our eyes will 
be "unto the hills from whence cometh 
our help," if we are as wise as we should 
be. I am praying that God will vindi- 
cate the right in His own time and way. 



SOUTHERN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson. 

I have put in an unusually busy month 
since my last letter. I have conducted 
two Ministers and Deacons Institutes 
and joint revivals. I delivered twenty- 
four sermons, ten lectures, made thirty 
house to house visits in which I read 
the Bible and prayed. Twelve persons 
professed faith in the Lord Jesus and 
two renounced Lodge affiliation. 

I held an Institute with Mount Mo- 
riah Baptist Church, Rev. E. E. Dorsey, 
Pastor, St. Patrick, Louisiana. I made 
the Scriptures plain and showed the 
heathen worship of secret societies with 
their altars of Baal. Although Rev. Mr. 
Dorsey is an ardent secretist and a be- 
liever in their sacrilegious forms of wor- 
ship, he acknowledged the truth and 
value of my method of Bible teaching, 
and urged his members to follow my in- 
structions, but like Ephriam of old he 
himself is joined to his idols. There 
was not much interest manifested by 
either laymen or clergymen except the 
pastor. If Rev. Mr. Dorsey could see 
the wickedness of his fellowship in oath- 
bound secret societies and would repent, 
he could do great good among his people 
since he wields a large influence among 
them. The contributions were unreason- 
ably small. 

From July 226. to 28th I conducted an 
Institute with St. Charles Baptist 
Church, Rev. H. W. F. Nixon, Pastor, 
Paincourtville, Louisiana. The attend- 
ance the first two days was encouraging, 
but the secret lodge almost paralyzed 
the meeting the remainder of the time, 
for on Wednesday, July 24th, the Odd- 
fellows had big initiations and "the mak- 
ing of men'' as they call it. Thursday, 
July 25th, the Most Noble District 
Grand Governess of "The Household 
of Ruth" with other grand officers paid 
their annual visit, and held a meeting 



with juveniles and adults during the day 
with a grand reception at night. On 
Sunday the 28th, two members of the 
"Tabernacle Lodge" from Klotzville and 
Plottonville, several miles away, pa- 
raded the principal street and marched 
to Pilgrim Baptist Church, Rev. S. 
Muse, pastor, and had their annual 
Thanksgiving sermon preached during 
the day and followed it with a public 
reception and free basket dinner. I 
counted five hundred persons at this 
Pilgrim Baptist Church, and there were 
at least six or seven hundred persons 
outside the church. In the church the 
"Tabs" gave their memorial sign by 
standing and all raising their right hands 
above their heads and bringing them 
down to their side, and repeating the 
same sign with their left hands. All 
struck across their chests with the palms 
of their hands with a thud ; the "Juve- 
niles" kept time with the elders. Rev. 
L. S. Harrel of White Castle, Louisiana, 
preached their sermon and on the whole 
it was an able and instructive sermon, 
but being desirous of pleasing his lodge 
associates he lauded their craft to the 
sky and urged all good people to join. 
Then throwing the Bible on his 
shoulders he began a regular whang- 
doodle performance and with screeching 
and moaning pandemonium reigned su- 
preme for fifty minutes more. The 
lodge lifted a free will collection which 
amounted to about $35.00. 

Rev. Mr. Nixon, at whose cozy home 
I have taken meals every day, was very 
painstaking and kind to me. The wor- 
thy superior, Mr. Preston Simon, treated 
me very courteously and gave me twenty 
minutes to speak in any way I desired 
to the people. 

The World war is being greatly used 
to further secret society enlistments in 
the cantonments. 

I have reorganized the Central Baptist 
Mission with fifteen loyal Christians 
and we are striving to build up a Chris- 
tian church where the whole, pure and 
unadulterated gospel can be and will be 
preached to all persons. 



"LIZZIE WOOD'S" LETTER. 

Dear Cynosure: 

My last letter to the Cynosure was 
written from Alton, Illinois, where we 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



157 



had good meetings for one week owing 
to the presence of the Lord being evi- 
dent in all the services. Every evening 
we declared the whole counsel of God to 
a crowded house. I also told them of 
their sins, and especially the sin of the 
lodge. I quoted chapters and verses 
from the Bible dealing with secretism 
and notwithstanding that the majority of 
the people were members of some secret 
order, no one showed signs of anger. 
The men were surprised to know that I 
had the secrets of Masonry and laugh- 
ingly acknowledged : "That is Masonry." 

A young preacher bought an Odd- 
fellows ritual and also a Masonic ritual 
and said he intended to study them thor- 
oughly that he also might be able to 
warn against the lodge evil. His brother 
said to him, "If you preach against the 
Lodge you are preparing yourself to get 
killed" ; and this young preacher ans- 
wered, "I am not afraid to die." I 
said, "Well, you cannot tell just what 
will happen, but if God is with you he 
will take the fear of death out of you. 
I distributed tracts among the people 
who read them with interest and aston- 
ishment. When a free will offering for 
me was taken the lodge people responded 
freely, and while it was being received, 
one man outdoors handed in twenty-five 
cents through an opened window and 
said, "Tell that woman to keep on telling 
the truth." The people of Alton were 
very cordial to me and the collection for 
the evening amounted to $19.00. Among 
those in the congregation were Masons 
of high standing but their hearts were 
honest and I believe they were Chris- 
tians, but they had never been told of 
the evil of secret societies. 

All Masons are not like Mr. J. A. 
Cooper of Youngstown, Ohio, in whose 
letter to Rev. Moses Clemens we were 
called the "National Christian Associa- 
tion of Liars." When men add to God's 
Word like the leaders of the Masonic 
lodge do, one can seldom get them to 
take up a challenge to debate with one 
of God's men, for they know that Prov. 
30 :6 is true, — "Lest he reprove thee, and 
thou be found a liar." 

God cannot lie and we will leave Mr. 
Cooper to see his position, for God's 
Word is "a lamp to our feet and a light 
to our path." (Ps. 119:105), Mr. Coop- 



er is to be pitied, and let all the members 
of the N. C. A. pray for him that God 
will forgive him for he knoweth not 
what he doeth. 

At Tulsa, Oklahoma, where I held 
tent meetings for eight days, I had an 
interesting experience. One night the 
Lord led me to tell the people of the un- 
christian character of secret orders. 
While I was speaking a sister told me 
that a Mason was standing a short dis- 
tance in back of me — he was so mad that 
two or three times he started for me. It 
frightened this woman a great deal as 
she was afraid he would strike me, but 
some other men stopped him. I did not 
know of the danger until all was past. 
The woman said to me, "Sister Rober- 
son, those negroes will kill you in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma, for they kill each other here 
— one or two every week." I said, Well, 
praise God, He protected me 'by His 
might'." 

When I left Tulsa early the following 
morning this woman was afraid to go 
with me to the station. I went direct to 
the depot with the help of an old man 
who carried my suit case, and I was 
singing Glory Hallelujah in my soul for 
God's protection and guidance. God has 
called me to preach and He takes all my 
fear away. If I am killed I will not 
know of it until the blow is struck and 
then I will not fear for I will be gone to 
be with Jesus, whose will I delight to do. 

Leaving Tulsa the 15th of July, I 
stopped at Coffeyville, Kansas, four 
nights and there I had more white peo- 
ple in the congregation than colored. 
God gave his poor servant power to 
speak and here also I gave out tracts 
condemning modern idolatry. Not one 
disputed the truth. I told them what 
God's Word said about their sin and 
their hearts were touched. We prayed 
together for our President and for our 
boys in the Camps and in the trenches 
in France. We cried and prayed to- 
gether for our country. Xo one had 
any time to dispute about the old lying- 
devil's lodges, which are leading good 
men and women down to hell. 

God bless all the members of the N. 
C. A. and let us pray for poor Mr. J. A. 
Cooper that God may save his soul. 

Yours for the work of the X. C. A. 
Lizzie Roberson. 



158 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



September, 1918 



THE GRANGE. 

Extracts from a letter to a relative who 
is a member of the Grange. The writer 
is J. C. Young, of DeGolia, Pennsylvania. 

"I thank you for your interest in get- 
ting to my notice the petition to Presi- 
dent Wilson from the farmers' lodges. 
It is a pity that farmers' interests are 
seized upon by secret orders so that all 
farmers cannot conscientiously voice 
their grievances together without some 
of them carrying grists to institutions 
with which they have no sympathy. I 
fail to see why the attempt to get the 
President's influence and assistance for 
the farmer could not have been gotten 
in the true democratic way, through 
open farmers' clubs. 

"I became a citizen of these United 
States in 1875, obtaining my certificate 
of naturalization after I had renounced 
all allegiance to the Queen of Great 
Britain and Ireland ; together with all 
other potentates and powers, and after 
I had sworn allegiance to the U. S. gov- 
ernment. I have never seen how I could 
swear allegiance to another power, a 
secret power, and still be a loyal citi- 
zen of the country that adopted me. 

"Had I not cast off my allegiance to 
the ruler of Great Britain I could never 
have obtained a citizen's rights and pro- 
tection from the United States Govern- 
ment, a privilege I would lose should 
I shift my allegiance to any outside na- 
tion. America does not accept hyphen 
citizenship. Why should she permit se- 
cret societies in a government like ours? 

"Daniel Webster, of national reputa- 
tion, declared: That all secret associa- 
tions the members of which (do) take 
upon themselves extraordinary obliga- 
tions to one another (outside citizen- 
ship) and are bound together by secret 
oaths, are naturally sources of jealousy 
and just alarm to others, are especial- 
ly unfavorable to harmony and mutual 
confidence among men living together 
under popular institutions (those pro- 
vided for in the U. S. Constitution) ; 
and are dangerous to the general cause 
of civil liberty and good government. 
Under the influence of this conviction 
it is my opinion that the future admini- 
stration of all such oaths, and the ad- 
ministration of all such obligations 
should be prohibited by law.' Are not 



his reasoning and conclusions in the 
premises sound? 

"Farmers as free citizens have the 
right to petition our President for re- 
lief, but secret lodges should never be 
granted such privileges. They are an- 
ti-republican and out of harmony with 
democracy. 

"The picture on the front page of 
'The Grange News,' which you sent me, 
may be very pretty, but it has no sug- 
gestion of farming. The costumes of 
those females carry the mind back to 
the times of the vestal virgins. And 
the Eleusinian Mysteries, commonly 
knov/n as "The Mysteries" and con- 
demned by St. Paul, 2 Cor. 6:14-15 and 
Eph. 5:11-12. As if to fix the thought 
more intently on those times in which 
Paul uttered his warning, on page 151 
same paper, Master McSparren tells us 
that he has consulted 'with the High 
Priest of Demeter' which recalls the 
history of the Israelites, 2 Kings 17: 7- 
23. In what age are we living? When 
we are solemnly told that the 'Master' 
consulted the High Priest of Sun wor- 
ship, Demeter? Of course Demeter is 
the Greek form of the Latin Ceres, there- 
fore both refer to the same filthy god- 
dess whose initiations and orgies were 
held in dark caverns but promised their 
votaries at death to take them to some 
heaven ; just as modern secret societies 
profess that their members at death en- 
ter upon a life of eternal felicity with 
their Father in Heaven. And all this 
without the shed blood of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, but by teaching unregen- 
erate men and women that lodge teach- 
ings 'are the loftiest men can seek.' The 
Bible and the teachings of Jesus are no- 
where in the deal. Such worship is the 
offering of Cain (Gen. 4: 3-4) notwith- 
standing that at the grave's mouth the 
mixed funeral rites end by the congre- 
gation being 'dismissed with a Christian 
benediction. 

"To say that secret society rituals are 
only a form, that the words have not 
a serious meaning, and that sentences 
do not mean what they naturally imply 
is certainly a horrible travesty on very 
sacred things. Unregenerate men and 
women attribute to them meaning ; many 
say 'It's good enough religion for me; if 



September, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



159 



I live up to its teachings I'm all right ; 
any way I stand as good a chance as 
the Christians who worship with me at 
the same altar.' Their conclusion is logi- 
cal, for two can't walk together unless 
they are agreed. It is with an ill grace 
that a professed Christian tries to im- 
press the need of a personal Savior on 
those with whom they worship in a 
lodge. 

"Yours for Christ's sake, 

"( Signed) J. C. YOUNG." 



ORANGEMEN. 

Buffalo, New York. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

Yours of the nth at hand. My ex- 
perience with the Orangemen is very 
limited. I simply took four degrees, the 
last one was the Royal Arch. Very 
shortly after taking that degree, I was 
invited to take part in administering the 
same degree to four other candidates for 
the same. Then it was that I became 
acquainted with the horrid oath that I 
myself had taken. As a general thing 
candidates are so frustrated while in the 
act of taking the degree, previous to tak- 
ing the oath, that but very few remem- 
ber the terms of the oath, at least that 
was the case with me. Hence my ex- 
perience in a practical way with the or- 
der is quite limited. I simply turned 
away from it with horror and disgust. 
The Orangemen's oath as near as I can 
recollect it, runs like this : "I never was 
a Roman Catholic and never will be a 
Roman Catholic and will never marry a 
Roman Catholic and will sustain the na- 
tion as long as she sustains a protestant 
religion." 

(Signed) Edward Swan. 



DOING NOT RESOLVING. 

Mr. H. F. Stubbs, of Whittier, Cali- 
fornia, writes: "I am making good use 
of my Cynosure putting them in the 
Electric Depot here. I tried to leave them 
in one public library but they refused 
to have them there. May God bless you 
in your good work." 



and Knight of Pythias but says he would 
never go back into them. 

"I must tell you an experience in prayer 
concerning giving out some leaflets. I 
have long wanted to talk with my pastor 
who is a Mason, but never had the op- 
portunity and was impressed to give him 
some leaflets, but I would carry them to 
church and then home again and never 
have the opportunity to present them. 
Finally I wondered if the devil was keep- 
ing me from doing what I ought to do 
and accordingly I prayed about it in this 
fashion, — that if He wanted me to give 
them out I was willing and would do 
so if He made the opportunity. Accord- 
ingly I made two packets, one for Chris- 
tians by the strongest men, such as Dr. 
Gray, etc. ; the other was the Masonic 
obligations and a catalog for a young 
man whom I had reason to believe would 
join the Masons. As soon as the church 
service was over I turned around and 
there stood my young man, and unhesi- 
tatingly I stepped up to him and said 
that I supposed he intended joining the 
Masons some day. He said that his ap- 
plication was now in, so I said that per- 
haps he would like to 'look before he 
leaped,' and handed him the obligation 
and as I mentioned that word, my pastor 
who was standing near looked up and 
such a queer look passed over his face. 
I handed him the other packet with the 
simple statement that I would like to 
have him read them. He glanced at 
them enough to see what they were and 
put them in his pocket. He has not men- 
tioned them to me since but I am praying 
that the Holy Spirit may strive with 
them both." 



A Nebraska friend wrote recently: 
"You have had an order from a friend 
whom I have interested in your work. 
Her husband used to be an Odd-Fellow 



Mr. Chas. B. Wolf, of Lebanon, Penn- 
sylvania, wrote under date of June 20th : 
"I love the Cynosure for one reason, it 
brings darkness into light and exposes 
secret sins. I want to thank God espe- 
cially for showing me and leading me to 
separate myself from the Odd-Fellows, 
Patriotic Order of the Sons of America, 
and Knights of the Brotherhood. I re- 
ceived the saving and healing power of 
God and have been enjoying this new 
life for seven years, hoping with my 
family to meet Christ when He comes 
in the air." 



Knights of Columbus 

ILLUSTRATED 

A COMPLETE RITUAL AND HISTORY OF THE FIRST 
THREE DEGREES, INCLUDING ALL SECRET 
"WORK", FULLY ILLUSTRATED BY A FORMER 
MEMBER OF THE ORDER. 

This work gives the proper position of each officer during the 
meetings, the proper manner of conducting the business of 
the Knights of Columbus, order of opening and closing 
of the Lodge, dress of candidates, ceremony of initiation; giving 
the signs, grips, pass words, etc. Convenient pocket size. 

Paper Covers - - - $ .75 
Cloth -';■.- - - 1-00 

National Christian Association 

850 W. Madison Street CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Notice to fteadersl— When you flnisi. reading this magazine place a 1-cent stamp on this notice, hand same U 
xv Coital employee/and It will be placed in the handa of our soldiers or sailors at the front. No wrapping. No 
I dress. A. S. BURLESON. Postmaster General. 




VOL. LI. 




CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1918 




REV. JOHN F. HEEMSTRA 
President, National Christian Association 



Number 6 




OFFICIAL ORGAN, NATIONAL CHRUTIAN AJTOCIATION 
10 CENTV A COPY EJTABUJHED I86S U>0 A YEAR 



Vol. LI, No, 6 



CHICAGO 



OCTOBER 1918 






CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
lit the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
Maraa 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Rev. John F. Heemstra, Photograph of. Cover 

Knights of Rome, by Inspector 163 

The Jew's Story 165 

Good Soldiers of the Lord Jesus Christ, 

by Pres. C. A. Blanchard 166 

An Even Chance 170 

The War and the Schools, by Pres. 

Woodrow Wilson 170 

Divorce Instigated 171 

Lodge Harbors the Enemy 171 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 172 

Ejected from Camp 175 

Seventeen Fifty Seven Exposure, or 

Synodical Action on Masonry, 1745. . . 176 

Bible Faith Illustrated 177 

"Precept Upon Precept," by Rev. H. M. 

Bissell 178 

The Life of a Mormon Girl (concluded). 180 

The Colored Americans 184 

The Latest Society, Philadelphia Public 

Ledger 185 

Odd-Fellow Version 185 

"Something to Think About" 186 



The Service of and Sacrifice for Sin, by 

Dr. Chas. Inglis, of London 186 

Masonic Rites : 186 

News of Our Work : 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 187 

Benjamin M. Holt 188 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 189 

A Real Estate Venture — The Gospel 

Messenger 190 

Rallying Around the Cynosure 191 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. John F. Heemstra; 
Vice-President, Rev. J. H. B. Williams ; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. F. H. Peter- 
son; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phil- 
lips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

M. P. F. Doermann, Thomas C. Mc- 
Knight, D. S. Warner, C. A. Blanchard, 
P. A. Kittilsby, H. A. Fischer, Jr., 
George Slager, A. H. Leaman, George 
W. Bond, and J. H. Hoekstra. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St., 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96. 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 





There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

— Acts 4:12 


CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 


m 

Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 





KNIGHTS OF ROME. 

The book entitled Knights of Colum- 
bus Illustrated, is also called "A com- 
plete ritual and history of the first three 
degrees, including all secret work." It 
teaches that "the charter granted in 1882 
defined the purposes of the society, as : 

"1. To furnish insurance to its mem- 
bers, and at least temporary financial aid 
to the families of deceased members; 

"2. To develop practical Catholicity 
among its members ; 

"3. To promote Catholic education 
and charity." 

Among conditions of membership, 
these three seem fundamental ; namely, 

"l. All Apostolic Delegates, Cardi- 
nals, Archbishops and Bishops, are ex 
officio members of the order, entitled to 
admittance on all occasions. 

"2. All priests, secular and regular, 
may join the order without examination, 
but must pay their dues to remain in 
good standing. 

"3. All male members of the Catho- 
lic church who are over sixteen years 
of age, and in good standing, are eligible. 
They must, however, show that they are 
Catholics; have made their last Easter 
duty; are willing, and will pledge them- 
selves, to live up to the laws of the 
church."^ 

"Initiations are conducted in classes 
of ten or more." "There is no inviolate 
form of ritual." In this particular, the 
Knights of Columbus are "Unlike all 
other orders." "In all the degrees, the 
essential idea alone is to be safe- 
guarded." 



"The First Degree is to test the faith 
of the candidates, and to teach them the 
responsibility of the act of faith." The 
nearest approach to an ordinary secret 
society obligation in this degree, con- 
sists of the affirmative response to ques- 
tions, as follows : 

"Do you pledge yourself to obey the 
church in all that relates to faith and 
morals?" 

"I do." 

"Do you pledge yourself to be a true 
knight of this Order, and to obey its 
laws at all times?" 

"I do." 

"It is well," says the Grand Knight. 
"Remember that you are a Catholic ; 
and for the future, you will be a Catholic 
Knight. . . . Retire now to prepare 
for the Second Degree." 

"The Captain of the Guard and his 
men go to the anteroom, and prepare 
the candidates in line." "The lesson to 
be conveyed to them in the Second De- 
gree is, that most of them have no in- 
telligent idea of what the faith consists 
of." "The contrast between their prompt 
avowal of their faith a few moments be- 
fore, in the first degree, and the public 
exposure of their ignorance, must be 
made as strong as possible by the of- 
ficers of the Council." "If there are 
any priests among the candidates, care 
must be taken to avoid asking them any 
questions." "The questioner is allowed 
great latitude." "Much of the success 
of the degree depends upon the subtle- 
ness and ingenuity of the questioner." 
"After this catechetical quiz has gone 



164 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October 1918 






on for some time, the Grand Knight 
gives the charge," which begins with a 
sweeping condemnation of their obvious 
inability to defend the faith according 
to their agreement. At the end he says: 
"Guards, lead the candidates to the ante- 
room, to prepare for the third degree." 

It may be presumed that many of the 
candidates have ended the second de- 
gree in a mortified and perhaps irritable 
mood. Lining them up again in the 
anteroom is now conducted "in such a 
surly manner that they will take offense 
and refuse to go into line." They can 
hardly do anything without severe cen- 
sure. Indignant at roughness, insult, 
and brutality, they are liable to rebel and 
refuse to proceed. Meanwhile, they are 
unaware that they are actually taking 
the first of the four sections of the third 
degree ; a section in which "the candi- 
dates are to be aroused to the last ex- 
treme of fury, but are to be handled so 
that they cannot do anything." The 
very purpose of the section is to "break 
the spirit of all if possible, and make all 
obey timidly the smallest command of 
the team members." 

Various details for which the reader 
can consult the book, include with other 
matters the efficient part played by a pre- 
tended or "decoy" priest. When at 
length the class is lined up supposing it- 
self to be about to begin the degree, the 
first quarter of which they have now 
been taking, they are blindfolded for the 
first and only time. They are now 
marched several times around the coun- 
cil chamber, when on the removal of 
the blinds they see before them a table 
bearing surgical instruments and writ- 
ing paper. Around the table doctors are 
seated. "Before you may go further," 
says the Chief Surgeon, "you must show 
that you are worthy ; you must submit 
to a test." . . . You will take this 
dagger, bare your arm, prick your veins, 
and sign this pledge with ' your own 



blood." A decoy candidate refuses, pro- 
testing. Before the real one who fol- 
lows can proceed far, he and. the rest 
are, under a plausible pretext, sent for 
• the time being out of the room. Here 
the second section ends, while the vic- 
tims of the deception suppose themselves 
not to have completed the first. 

Instead of leading them back to the 
anteroom, the guards bring them by an- 
other door into a room so small that 
they can hardly move about without 
jostling. It has been so well heated as 
to merit its name, "Hot Box." The 
surly captain starts fresh trouble. Then 
he quarrels again with the decoy priest, 
and slaps him on the mouth. "At once 
there is an uproar; . . . the can- 
didates are roused to fury; . . . 
the inside and outside guards . . . 
must see that the door is opened before 
it is broken down." "Then all rush out 
into the council chamber shouting and 
gesticulating/' When the confusion is 
sufficiently quieted to allow the complaint 
of one candidate at a time to be heard, 
the third section has ended where the 
fourth section of the third degree at once 
begins. 

If necessary, a decoy starts the ball 
rolling, by standing on a chair and in a 
bitter speech denouncing the procedure. 
With fiery protest and sharp demand, he 
opens wide the way for as many as will 
follow to free their minds from the same 
platform — or chair. In this case laymen 
speak ex cathedra. Mute inglorious 
Ciceros suddenly reveal themselves as 
brilliant orators. French volubility al- 
ternates with native Irish eloquence. 
Genuine priests among the initiates lash 
with masterly invective the whole pro- 
ceeding. 

When all who wish have freed their 
minds the Grand Knight, standing upon 
the chair, deprecates the occurrence an- 
nouncing an immediate trial for which 
seven jurymen are chosen. Prepara- 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURI* 



165 



tion of the jury develops new dispute 
and trouble. Presently the flash and 
sharp report of a revolver are followed 
by the fall of the captain into the arms 
of his guards while blood pours over 
his chest. Priests rush to give him ab- 
solution ; he is carried to the anteroom ; 
its closing door shuts all within the coun- 
cil chamber. 

During the next ten or fifteen minutes 
the candidates are in a state of mind 
that is not soothed by the whispering of 
old members. "The dramatic climax is 
worked up naturally, until all the can- 
didates are consumed with anxiety to 
know the worst." Suddenly, the door of 
the anteroom opens and in comes the 
Captain. With him are the Decoy Priest, 
and other actors who have been with 
them in the earlier scenes. The Grand 
Knight, taking the middle of the floor 
with the others around him, now says, 
"Gentlemen and Brothers : When I have 
given the solution of the strange adven- 
tures which you have gone through this 
day, you will learn the most telling les- 
son ever devised to teach you that things 
are not always what they seem." He 
proceeds to remove part of the priest's 
disguise, and to show the murderer to be 
no criminal after all, and the milder act- 
ing soon ends with the Captain and the 
Priest heartily shaking hands. 

The Grand Knight, proceeds with a 
lodge lecture, at the end of which he 
says : "Raise your right hands and re- 
peat after me the pledge of fealty to 
the Order. T now solemnly pledge my- 
self to keep sacred the secrets of this 
order ; to be a loyal and true son of the 
church ; and a faithful member of the 
Knights of Columbus. I will always be 
ruled by knightly courtesy in my rela- 
tions with my fellow men. I pledge my- 
self to God, to His Holy Church, to my 
country, to mankind, to be always a true 
knight. Amen.' " 

The candidate does not sav, "I swear 



to keep the secrets," or "I swear always 
to be a true Knight." He invokes no 
penalty upon his own body or his soul. 
"Oath" is unheard; the selected word is 
"Pledge." In this order, Jesus Christ 
is not pointedly ignored; on the contrary, 
the statement of belief made at the can- 
didate's first entrance into the Council 
Chamber includes mentioning the Son 
of God. 

Careful avoidance of all reference to 
a church is not duplicated here. The 
word church appears again and again 
where the church is set forth as the ob- 
ject of faith, devotion, and full obe- 
dience. Indeed, putting forward, magni- 
fying, and openly exalting the church, 
comes near being the distinctively salient 
feature of the initiation viewed as a 
whole. 

Yet the farcical element seems, even 
to a Protestant, almost an approach to 
sacrilege. Along with this, one seems 
to feel a singular lack of moral empha- 
sis ; for, although the Knight does claim 
to believe in God, and even says, "I 
pledge myself to God," yet whenever he 
plainly and explicitly pledges obedience, 
it is "obedience to the church," or "obe- 
dience to the laws of this Order." Xo less 
surprising is the singular omission of 
prayer from the ritual of initiation. 
There is, likewise, no prayer in regular 
lodge meetings when the chaplain hap- 
pens to be absent. The only prayer he 
offers, when present, is this invocation : 
"May the blessing of Almighty God, 
Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, descend 
upon us and remain with us forever. 
Amen." 

IxsrECTOR. 



THE JEW'S STORY. 
In a Christian village there once lived 
a man who was the only Jew in the town. 
He had a small store and did a good busi- 
ness, and as he succeeded the Christians 
became jealous of him. After discussing 
the matter in a meeting the priest pro- 



166 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October, 1918 



posed to the Jew that he must either be- 
come a Christian or leave the village. 
The Jew inquired what he must do to 
become a Christian, and eventually had 
to undergo some useless ceremony in 
order not to lose his money. Upon his 
becoming a Christian the neighbors 
watched to see what he would do on Fri- 
day evening ; would he eat meat as usual, 
or conform to the Romish custom of not 
doing so. Upon seeing him continue as 
formerly, the people told the priest that 
the Jew was no Christian as he had roast 
goose on his table on Friday evening. 
The priest watched himself then and 
suddenly came upon the Jew while he 
was seated with his family at the elabo- 
rately prepared table eating a roast goose. 
"Now, Mr. Moses," said the priest, 
"what is this ?" "Why, Rev. Father, this 
is not a goose, this is fish." "Any one 
can see,*' answered the priest, "that this 
is goose flesh." But the Jew replied, 
"Rev. Father, I did just as you did when 
you changed me into a Christian. You 
put a drop of water upon me three times 
and said, 'You are no more a Jew. You 
are a Christian,' so I put a drop of water 
upon this goose and said, 'You are fish.' " 



Those who preach the Gospel should 
use God's revealed truth about the Lord 
Jesus Christ to enlighten the understand- 
ing, and through that to rouse the con- 
science, to engage the affections, and to 
decide the will ; and when this is done a 
soul is really helped ; but merely to ex- 
cite the emotions, especially by some vul- 
gar appeals, and then tell the person with 
the excited feeling that he or she is now 
converted is sadly unscriptural, and may 
be fatally misleading. May the Lord 
keep us sincere and without offense until 
the day of Christ. John Dickie. 



We often hear people complain of the 
distractions of their minds in prayer. 
But if we watch those same people, they 
do not suffer from the lack of concen- 
tration in other pursuits which are con- 
genial to them. It is not that they lack 
the capacity for concentration, it is sim- 
ply that they have not taken prayer seri- 
ously. They have not summoned them- 
selves to the undertaking. Their prafyer 
life is trifling. — Selected. 



GOOD SOLDIERS OF THE LORD 
JESUS CHRIST. 

PRESIDENT CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, 
WHEATON COLLEGE. 

A good soldier is one who obeys or- 
ders and who fights for his king until 
victory comes. One who lays down his 
arms, or who deserts the field because 
the battle goes heavy, is not a good sol- 
dier. 

I remember, years ago, to have met a 
gentleman in one of our Illinois towns 
where I was lecturing. He said to me, 
"I know all about secret societies. I 
had contact with them in my early life, 
and have had opportunities for knowl- 
edge ever since. I know that they are 
entirely evil, and ought to be abolished, 
but I do not intend to help you in the 
struggle against them at all." I thanked 
him for his frankness, and asked him 
the reason why. He said, "I have been 
through one battle. I knew what it was 
to be hated, and despised, because I was 
an Abolitionist. I fought that thing 
through, and when the war came, went 
into the army, making good on field of 
battle what I had taught in church and 
home. I think I have done my share. 
I expect now to live quietly, to save my 
money, and my time, and my feelings. 
Other people, who did not fight the anti- 
slavery battle, have got to do the work 
in these days. I have done my share, 
and now I want the rest to do theirs." 
These may not be his exact words, but 
they do convey his exact thought. It is 
many years since he spoke to me, and 
I do not profess a perfect recollection 
of his phrasing. 

I am reminded of his remark by the 
statement of a friend, who recently 
wrote our office saying that he was dis- 
continuing his subscription to the Cyno- 
sure, because it seemed to him as if the 
battle was going against us. 

The Daily List of Dead. 

The casualty list which is published 

now from day to day, contains from a 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



107 



few score up to a few hundred names. 
The men who are killed or wounded are 
now fighting a successful battle. It seems 
that God has planned to give us victory, 
but for four years, the news from day 
to day was discouraging. It took fully 
two years for the allies to be in any 
measure prepared for the battle. Up 
to that time our dear fellows were hold- 
ing their ground by the very skin of 
their teeth. In one of the early battles, 
the Canadians were six to eight feet 
apart, and yet stood there resisting the 
onslaught of a great German army. If 
our men in those days had taken the 
same position which these friends oc- 
cupy, they would have said "the battle 
is going against us. Germany is too 
strong. Let us quit and go home." The 
result would have been that France and 
England would have paid billions of dol- 
lars to these central nation thieves, and 
if America had not been taxed imme- 
diately, she would have been ultimately, 
in the same manner. 

Money Loss the Least. 
While the money tax would have been 

staggering, it would have been the least 
of the losses, for the outrages on old 
people, women and children which have 
been wrought by the central powers have 
never been equalled, except in savage 
warfare. The university men who have 
been fighting in these central armies, 
have been systematically and continually 
conducting themselves like the Indians, 
who scalped and burned and outraged, 
in their time. We could have avoided 
these difficulties in part, by humbly sub- 
mitting to any outrages which those pow- 
ers chose to inflict, but no man who has 
read the utterances of their philosophers 
and theologians, can doubt that what is 
outlined above would have been substan- 
tially the program to which we should 
have had to conform. 

Peace at Any Price. 
I suppose there are some persons now 



who would say that peace at any price is 
better than war. 1 remember a case in 
Birmingham, England, when the great 
meeting was held to protest against a 
strife upon which England had entered. 
A powerful and magnetic speaker took 
the position to which I have just re- 
ferred. Painting in broad and terrible 
colors the miseries of warfare, he said 
that peace at any price was better than 
the evils of which he had been speaking. 
Doctor Dale, at that time the great 
preacher of Birmingham, was in the 
audience, and w T hen this address was 
concluded there was a roar of "Dale, 
Dale, Dale, Dale, Dale'' which went over 
the great and electrified audience. He 
came to the platform, and when a great 
silence was made said, "I too, am in 
favor of peace at any price." Pausing, 
he repeated "at any price, even when 
the -price is war!" The result was a 
clarification of the atmosphere and a 
complete revulsion of feeling, so that 
those who had felt that the government 
ought to turn its back in the battle, were 
satisfied that they should fight on to vic- 
tory. 

He That Endureth to the End. 

The promised reward is not for the 

people who fight for a while and quit, 
but for the people who fight until vic- 
tory is gained. He that endureth to the 
end shall be saved, and he shall be re- 
warded also. The apostles, prophets, 
and martyis are those whose faith we 
are to follow. It is true that fidelity to 
conviction oftentimes entails losses of 
various sorts. Men sacrifice ease, they 
sacrifice money, they sacrifice, often- 
times, their lives, but this is the price 
which they pay for the blessings for 
which they contend. 

I remember that Samuel Adams said, 
when the Boston men were discussing 
whether to go into the war, "If it were 
revealed to me by an angel from heaven 
that this war would continue until our 



168 



CHRISTIAN' CYNOSURE 



October. 1918 



property was wasted, and nine-tenths of 
our people had been destroyed, I should 
unhesitatingly say 'let us go forward.' 
One free man can enjoy more happiness 
and be of more value to the world than 
a thousand slaves." I do not profess to 
quote him exactly. I speak from mem- 
ory, but the substance of this utterance 
was as given. 

This is a good time in which to recall 
the lives of the statesmen, the soldiers, 
the missionaries, and the great com- 
pany of saints who in hard times and 
hard places have stood true to their con- 
victions, and battled through difficulties 
to success. 

It would be idle to say that this is not 
a discouraging time for all religious and 
moral enterprises. The soldiers are, 
many of them, rendered thoughtful by 
the circumstances in which they find 
themselves. I suppose many ten thou- 
sands of them have returned to the faith 
of their fathers because of the dangers 
to which they are hourly subjected. This 
is well, but in the home regions I am not 
sure that we are registering an advance. 
I do not know of an immorality which 
has not harnessed patriotism to its car. 
Dancing, card playing, tobacco using, 
everything except the liquor power, 
seems to have secured the right of way, 
even among Christian people. The prop- 
osition is : "this is necessary in order to 
get money for the soldiers. Therefore, 
it is all right." A lady told me yester- 
day, a gentleman who last year gave five 
hundred dollars to warn people against 
the cigarette habit, was this year paying 
fifty dollars a month to purchase cigar- 
ettes for the soldiers. All fairly intel- 
ligent and thoughtful people know that 
the cigarette movement is financed and 
pressed by the tobacco trust. Such an 
outlay of money as is now made to boom 
the tobacco business, does not come by 
accident. It is a propaganda which has 
a headquarters and a treasury. 



Only this week I read of a company 
of five hundred women, who got together 
to dance and play cards to raise money 
to buy cigarettes for soldiers. This in 
the face of the testimony of superintend- 
ents of police and other civil officers, 
that dancing fills up houses of ill fame, 
and card playing fills up the gambling 
dens. Yet these good people, who are 
managing these enterprises in the inter- 
ests, as they suppose, of the soldiers, are 
really injuring the soldiers and booming 
the disreputable business which secretly 
urges them on. 

The Darkest Day in History. 

I suppose that the darkest day known 
in human history was the day on which 
Jesus Christ was crucified. The world 
was lying in darkness, degradation, su- 
perstition and sin. The masses of the 
people bore all the burdens, and a little 
handful of kings and priests divided all 
the advantages of society. Jesus Christ 
came into the world to reverse the situa- 
tion, to make men good, that they might 
be happy, that the burdens of society 
might be divided and that the advan- 
tages of society might also be distrib- 
uted. He harmed no one, spoke evil of 
no one, blessed everyone with whom He 
came in contact, but He did not succeed 
in pleasing the devil nor the devil's peo- 
ple and, unfortunately, then as now, 
many of the devil's people had fine repu- 
tations with the world. 

Over the head of Jesus on the cross 
was written his accusation in the Greek, 
the Latin, and the Hebrew. At that time 
the Greek nation represented the high- 
est artistic culture the world has ever 
known. The Roman people represented 
the highest form of civic organization 
which the world had known up to that 
time, possibly it has never been since sur- 
passed. The Jewish people were the 
only people in the world who at that 
time had a clear revelation of God, and 
the truths by which He wishes men ta 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



169 



live. The fact that these three great na- 
tions combined to secure the murder of 
the Son of God, is one that never should 
be forgotten when we come to discus- 
sions of this kind. 

I suppose that my friend who stops his 
paper because he is afraid that secret 
societies are going to rule the world, if 
he had stood by the Cross of Jesus 
Christ, and had been as good a man as 
1 think he is t would have said something 
like this : "This man Jesus Christ is un- 
doubtedly a Holy Man. His life has 
been in every respect such a life as a 
worthy man should live, but unfortu- 
nately, He is before His time. The 
world is not ready to receive Him. I 
wish it were, I would very gladly follow 
His banner, and fight under His com- 
mand if there were any use, but what 
is the use? His followers are a handful 
of uninfluential people, His enemies are 
the rulers of the world. Even the lead- 
ers of His own people would rather a 
thief and a murderer should be set at 
liberty than that He should be freed 
from the lying accusation which these 
men have made again Him. I will, there- 
fore, go home just now, and by and by 
if there is opportunity without too much 
sacrifice to take a place among His fol- 
lowers, I will do it, but at present the 
cost is too great for the prospective gain. 
I will not recognize Him as my leader 
now." I think that this sort of a decision 
could be amply justified on the grounds 
of self-interest and human probabilities, 
but we people who profess faith in Jesus 
Christ do not live for self-interest, and 
we do not judge according to human 
probabilities. We walk by faith, not by 
sight. We have always had this to do, 
we have it to do now. We shall have it 
to do to the end. 

There is no road to the crown of Jesus 
Christ, except the one that leads by the 
cross of Jesus Christ. The old motto 
"No cross, no crown" is not poetic, it is 



practical and businesslike. It means 
exactly what it says, "No cross, no 
crown." We can choose, and we not 
only can choose, we must choose. We 
do choose, and we choose with this al- 
ternative, "no cross, no crown." 

It is true that the crosses which are 
placed upon us Christians in these days 
are not generally so rough and hard to 
bear as the cross which Jesus our 
Saviour carried up Calvary, for us. We 
do not ordinarily sink from physical ex- 
haustion under the burdens as He did 
under His, but we must be willing to 
do even this if it were necessary. 

A friend of mine was, about sixty 
years ago, publicly whipped in a square 
of the city of Nashville, Tennessee, fifty 
lashes on his bare back, because he was 
selling Bibles which were wrapped in 
an anti-slavery paper. Finding these 
Bibles thus wrapped in his little trunk, 
which he was carrying as a colporteur, 
they asked him if he was opposed to 
slavery, and he honestly said that he was. 
He was, therefore, sentenced to this pun- 
ishment. The man who wielded the raw- 
hide with which he was whipped, after- 
wards boasted that he made the blood 
and flesh fly, so that they would not 
hang my friend, which otherwise they 
would have done. He felt quite proud 
that he had been so humanitarian. It 
seems difficult to believe this story now, 
but it is only a little while since the 
events took place and, unfortunately, this 
is only one case out of a great number. 
I, therefore, urge my friends who are 
discouraged to read their New Testa- 
ments, to study the history of the Chris- 
tian Church. I think this will illuminate 
their minds and encourage their hearts. 
and will make them, so far as they are 
children of God, willing to endure hard- 
ship like good soldiers of Jesus Christ. 



It is wiser to train twelve men than to 
do a hundred men's work. 



170 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October. 1918 



AN EVEN CHANCE. 

When a saloon-keeper emphasized the 
expression of his convictions by offering" 
to bet his "soul against a rotten apple," a 
crusty old customer grunted out his sat- 
isfaction at finding one man who was not 
always trying to get the better of others, 
but was willing to be fair, and make an 
even bet ! 

There are many people who are not so 
fair; who, in truth, are never willing to 
be fair. They are always trying to get 
on the inside track and they always have 
some little plans and schemes of their 
own by which they try to obtain special 
advantages. They belong to some secret 
order, the members of which work for 
each other, and so, of course, work 
against every one else who stands in the 
way of their advancement. They have 
secret signs, and winks, and nods, by 
which they secure their own advantage, 
and at the same time hinder, by unfair 
and illegitimate means, the advantage of 
others. 

They are not manly and above-board 
in their transactions, but are ever en- 
deavoring by indirect means to over- 
reach their fellows. In politics they 
work their way in among party leaders ; 
in law they have an understanding with 
judges and juries ; in ecclesiastical affairs 
they pack committees, control caucuses, 
manipulate nominations, concoct resolu- 
tions, and always manage to keep in of- 
fice. If any man offends them, they 
crush him if they can ; not in open, manly 
conflict, for they meet him with a smile 
as bland as that of Joab, when he said to 
Amasa, "Art thou in health, my broth- 
er?" and took him by the beard to kiss 
him, at the same time thrusting his sword 
under the fifth rib. They are as courte- 
ous and polite as was Judas Iscariot 
when he said, "Hail, Master, and kissed 
him." But beneath this sweet, bland, 
smooth exterior, lurks the slanderous 
tongue, the envious glance, the vile in- 
sinuation, the shrug, the sneer, and the 
open falsehood, with which these men 
slay those for whom they profess great 
friendship and regard. One can arm 
against open enemies, but what armor is 
there against the stratagems and devices 
of professed friends, who will tell false- 
hoods with more unction than ordinary 
men can command when they speak the 



truth ; who call a man "brother" while 
they assail him as a liar and a knave ; 
and who dignify this duplicity under the 
title of "Christian meekness," and^accuse 
the honest men who denounce it of being 
actuated by "a bad spirit" ? 

It may be well to remember that while 
both Christ and Satan are represented 
under the figure of a lion, the figure of 
the silent, gliding, creeping serpent is re- 
served for Satan alone. And while a 
man with the spirit of Christ may be 'both 
bold or gentle, the deceptive, crafty, in- 
sidious spirit of the serpent belongs to 
the adversary, the devil. 

Let Christians see to it that they imi- 
tate their Master, and not their enemy. 
Fairness, justice, and righteousness, are 
characteristics of the blessed Christ, and 
those who aim to be his imitators must 
have something more than mere softness 
of speech, and meekness of expression, to 
justify their claim. They must have hon- 
esty, uprightness, truth, fidelity, and fair- 
dealing, if they would be followers of the 
Lord Jesus Christ in this world, and 
sharers of his royal glory in the world 
which is to come. — The Armory. 



THE WAR AND THE SCHOOLS. 

By President Wilson. 

Washington, 
31 July, 1918. 
My dear Mr. Secretary : 

I am pleased to know that despite the 
unusual burdens imposed upon our peo- 
ple by the war they have maintained their 
schools and other agencies of education 
so nearly at their normal efficiency. That 
this should be continued throughout the 
war and that, in so far as the draft law 
will permit, there should be no falling off 
in attendance in elementary schools, high 
schools or colleges is a matter of the very 
greatest importance, affecting both our 
strength in war and our national welfare 
and efficiency when the war is over. So 
long as the war continues there will be 
constant need of very large numbers of 
men and women of the highest and most 
thorough training for war service in 
many lines. After the war there will be 
urgent need not only for trained leader- 
ship in all lines of industrial, commercial, 
social and civic life, but for a very high 
average of intelligence and preparation 
on the part of all the people. I would 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



171 



therefore urge that the people continue 
to give generous support to their schools 
of all grades and that the schools adjust 
themselves as wisely as possible to the 
new conditions to the end that no. boy or 
girl shall have less opportunity for edu- 
cation because of the war and that the 
nation may be strengthened as it can only 
be through the right education of all its 
people. I approve most heartily your 
plans for making through the Bureau of 
Education a comprehensive campaign foi 
the support of the schools and for the 
maintenance of attendance upon them, 
and trust that you may have the co-oper- 
ation in this work of the American Coun- 
cil of Education. 

Cordially and sincerely yours, 
Woodrow Wilson. 
Hon. Franklin K. Lane, 
Secretarv of the Interior. 



in Christ they are one, but here they are 
separated. Then, who has separated 
those whom the Lord had united ? Who 
began the proceedings in divorce? 

S. 



DIVORCE INSTIGATED. 

I have often wondered whether pro- 
fessed Christians, who seek their fellow- 
ship in secret organizations which do not 
admit females, ever gave this question a 
serious thought. Man can go in, but the 
woman is left out. In I. Cor. xi., n, we 
read, "Neither is the man without the 
woman, neither the woman without the 
man in the Lord.'' Here it is clearly 
shown that the one is not taken in to the 
exclusion of the other. We notice, then, 
that when it comes to being in the Lord, 
both can go in together, for, we also 
read in Gal. iii., 28, "There is neither Jew 
nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, 
there is neither male nor female ; for ye 
are all one in Christ Jesus." This is very 
clear that they both can go together in 
serving the Lord. 

But into the Odd-Fellow and Masonic 
lodges the man can go, but must not take 
his wife, sister or mother. Who makes 
the separation ? The Lord or the lodge ? 
Then, if the Lord has united the man 
and the woman, and the lodge separates 
them, is not the lodge, then, against the 
Lord? Jesus says, "He that is not with 
me is against me ; and he that gathereth 
not with me scattereth abroad." (Matt, 
xii., 30.) Now, in this case, which one 
is in Christ, the man, who goes into the 
lodge, or the woman, who is left out? It 
must be clear to every mind that either 
the one who goes into the lodge, or the 
one who is left out, is out of Christ ; for 



LODGE HARBORS THE ENEMY. 

He was a citizen with a good reputa- 
tion and one of the "good fellow" type 
that fits so well into the atmosphere of 
the Order. He came to live at the Elks' 
Home, mingled with the members and 
was looked upon as a good American of 
German birth who deplored the failings 
of the land of his nativity. One day he 
disappeared and in his wake came the 
Secret Service. It was then discovered 
that the home of the lodge had been used 
as headquarters for a scheme of system- 
atic violation of the neutrality laws. 
After the bird had flown it was found 
out also that one of his associates, a 
highly connected and hitherto reputable 
business man, had been accepted for 
membership and was awaiting initiation. 
The latter is now safely stowed away in 
an American prison. — The Elks- Antler, 
August, 19 1 8. 

How naturally the obligations of a se- 
cret lodge render aid to treason. Mor- 
mon missionaries find it to their advan- 
tage to belong to one or more of the 
prominent secret societies in propagating 
their doctrines. How much more natu- 
ral for our country's enemies to shelter in 
lodges. 

"A more perfect agent for the devising 
and execution of conspiracies against 
church and state could scarcely have been 
conceived." — Charles Francis Adams. 

"In conducting the governments of the 
world, there are not only sovereigns and 
ministers, but secret orders to be consid- 
ered, which have agents everywhere — 
reckless agents, who countenance assas- 
sination, and, if necessary, can produce 
a massacre." — Disraeli, Lord Beacons- 
field. 



You do not need to choose evil in or- 
der to get on to the side of evil ; you can 
get on to the side of wrong by not mak- 
ing choice at all. You can get on the 
side of wrong by pure indecision and 
carelessness. You can slip down hill, 
but there is no law on earth by which 
you can slip up hill and make any prog- 
ress. — Selected. 



172 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October, 1918 



(gotjti (^ttinrg Aimma— &xtf)$r?mfr ntlmi? b ^tafra 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

Quincy, i May, 1833. 
To Edward Livingston, Esq., 

Sir: The Entered Apprentice's oath, 
obligation, and penalty, upon which I 
took to animadvert, in the four letters to 
Col. William L. Stone, a copy of which 
was transmitted to you, with the first of 
these letters to yourself, was in the terms 
of that obligation as furnished by the offi- 
cers of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island 
themselves, to the committee of the legis- 
lature of that state, appointed to investi- 
gate the charges against the institution 
which had been made since the murder 
of Morgan, and which they and you pro- 
nounce calumnious. The obligations 
themselves had never been authenticated 
by the authority of adhering Masons, un- 
til they were produced by the officers of 
the grand lodge and grand chapter, at 
the peremptory requisition of the legisla- 
tive committee. They were generally 
considered by Masons as constituting es- 
sential parts of the mysteries of the craft, 
and included strictly within the promise 
never to write, print, cut, carve, paint, 
stain or engrave them. In the practice of 
the chapters and lodges, the oaths are all 
administered by rote, and pass by tradi- 
tion alone. This is of course the cause of 
the differences in phraseology of the 
oaths as administered by different per- 
sons. It is one of the great inherent 
vices of the institution. It affords con- 
stant opportunity and frequent tempta- 
tion to every chapter and lodge to make 
additions to the promises pledged by the 
recipient of each degree. 

The manuscript obligations furnished 
by the grand chapter and grand lodge of 
Rhode Island were drawn up and re- 
duced to writing for the occasion. The 
grand lodge had previously published a 
defense of Masonry, stoutly denying that 



there was anything in the Masonic obli- 
gations contrary to religion, morals, or 
the laws of the land; but carefully ab- 
staining from any statement of what they 
were. They had used that notable device 
of explaining the penalty of death for re- 
vealing the secrets of the craft, or of any 
of its members, as meaning only a prom- 
ise to suffer death rather than reveal 
them. They had expounded and ex- 
plained and denied the several parts and 
parcels" of the Masonic obligations, till 
they had made them all as innocent as 
their lambskin aprons. They had espe- 
cially denied, with abundance of indigna- 
tion, that they had ever administered or 
taken the oath to conceal the secrets of a 
brother Mason — "murder and treason 
not excepted/' These words, or others 
equivalent to them, are stated, in Elder 
Bernard's Light on Masonry, and in Av- 
ery Allyn's Ritual, to form a part of the 
Royal Arch obligation. They are certi- 
fied as such by the convention of seceding 
Masons, held at Le Roy, on the fourth of 
July, 1828, twenty three of whom had 
taken this oath ; and they have since been 
attested by adhering Masons, upon trials 
before judicial tribunals in the State of 
New York. They are not in the Royal 
Arch obligation reported by the grand 
chapter of Rhode Island ; but in the Mas- 
ter Mason's obligation, reported by the 
grand lodge. Among the promises of 
admission to that degree are the follow- 
ing words : "That I will keep a brother's 
secrets as my own, when commtited to 
me in charge as such, murder and treason 
excepted." This, of course, is a pledge 
of immunity, for all other crimes, but it 
does except murder and treason. So said 
the grand lodge of Rhode Island. Yet 
even in that state, Nathan Whiting, an 
attorney and counsellor at law, who had 
taken the degree in the lodge at East 
Greenwich, and had been master of that 
lodge, testified that in the Master's de- 
gree, after "murder and treason except- 
ed" the usual form was to add "and that 
at my option" — and what the difference 
is between that, and "murder and treason 
not excepted" I leave as a problem in 
morals for Masonic casuists to solve. 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



17.3 



In the seventh of Col. Stone's Letters 
upon Masonry, page 56, referring to the 
disagreement in the phraseology of the 
obligations, as given in different places, 
he makes mention of a manuscript then 
in his possession, containing copies of 
the obligations of the several degrees, as 
they were given twenty years before in 
the lodge and chapter of an eastern city 
— copied from the manuscript of a distin- 
guished gentleman who had been master 
of the lodge and high-priest of the chap- 
ter. The forms, says Col. Stone, are the 
same that were used in that city for a 
long series of years ; and when Royal 
Arch Masonry was introduced into 
Rochester, in the State of New York, 
these forms, from these identical papers, 
were then and there introduced and 
adopted. 

There is at this passage a reference to 
a note in the appendix, stating it to have 
been the original intention of Col. Stone 
to insert all the obligations- contained 
in that manuscript, in his text ; but that 
he was compelled to suppress them from 
the unforeseen extent of his work. He 
observes that neither of the obligations 
in the first three degrees, in those manu- 
scripts, is more than half as long as those 
disclosed by Morgan, and in common 
use. He further adds that these manu- 
scripts give a more sensible and intelli- 
gible, and a less exceptionable account of 
the seven degrees of Masonry, than any 
other work he had seen ; and he con- 
cludes by observing that when Morgan 
was at Rochester, these papers were 
there, and already written to his hands. 

It is to be regretted that Col. Stone did 
not adhere to his first intention of pub- 
lishing these obligations, or rather that he 
did not insert the whole manuscript in 
his appendix. I have obtained it from 
him, and annex hereto the three obliga- 
tions as there recorded, of the Entered 
Apprentice, the Fellowcraft, and the 
Master Mason. It will be found upon 
examination, that although truly repre- 
sented by him as perhaps not more than 
half so long as the same obligations in 
Morgan's and Bernard's books^ they lose 
nothing of pith and moment by the re- 
trenchment of words. They were the 
forms used at Rochester, and no other 
Masonic institution in the state was more 
deeply implicated in the tragedy of Mor- 



gan's kidnaping and murder, than that 
same chapter at Rochester. Now, in the 
Entered Apprentice's oath of this manu- 
script, the promise is expressly and ex- 
plicitly to keep and conceal the secrets 
of Masons as well as Masonry. The pen- 
alty is the same as that reported by the 
grand lodge of Rhode Island, but in the 
lecture to the candidate on his admission 
there is in the manuscript an explanation 
of the meaning of the penalty, which not 
only utterly falsifies the explanation of 
the Rhode Island Masons, so strangely 
accepted and countenanced by the major- 
ity report of the legislative investigating 
committee, but proves that the murderers 
of Morgan understood but too well the 
real character of the obligation. 

In this Entered Apprentice's lecture, 
the candidate, after going through the 
forms of admission, is examined by the 
master, upon interrogatories with regard 
to the meaning of all the ceremonies 
through which he has passed. Upon giv- 
ing the account of his admission at the 
door, the following, word for word, are 
the questions put to him by the Master, 
and his answers : 

O. "What did you next hear?" 

A. "One from within, saying with an 
audible voice, 'Let him enter.' ' : 

O. "How did you enter?" 

A. "Upon the point of a sword, spear, 
or other warlike instrument, presented to 
my naked left breast, accompanied with 
this expression, 'Do you feel ?' ' : 

O. "Your answer?" 

A. "I do." 

O. "What was next said?" 

A. "Let this be a prick to your con- 
science, a shield to your faith, and instant 
death in case you revolt." 

Yes, sir, this is the explanation given 
to the Entered Apprentice, at the time of 
his admission to the degrees, of the pen- 
alty under which he binds himself by his 
oath — this was the formula used in Con- 
necticut more than twenty-rive years 
since, and thence introduced into Roch- 
ester, in the State of Xew York. Who 
shall say that the murderers of Morgan 
misunderstood the import of the Entered 
Apprentice's obligation ? 

And in this same manuscript of the 
forms of admission used at Rochester, 
the following, word for word, are clauses 
of the Master Mason's obligation: 



174 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October 1918 



"I further promise and swear, that I 
will attend a brother barefoot, if neces- 
sity requires, to warn him of approaching 
danger ; that on my knees I will remem- 
ber him in my prayers; that I will take 
him by the right hand and support him 
with the left, in all his just and lawful 
undertakings ; that I will keep his secrets 
as safely deposited in my breast, as they 
are in his own, treason and murder only 
excepted, and those at my option; that 
I will obey all true signs, tokens and 
summonses, sent me by the hand of a 
Master Mason, or from the door of a 
just and regular Master Mason's lodge, 
if within the length of my cabletow." 

This was the form of admission to the 
Master Mason's degree at Rochester, 
when the chapter at Rochester decided 
that Morgan had incurred the penalties 
of his obligations, and sent out their 
signs, tokens and summonses according- 
ly. 

These were the oaths which every 
Master Mason admitted at the lodge in 
Rochester, had taken. All this he had 
"most solemnly and sincerely promised 
and sworn with a full and hearty resolu- 
tion to perform the same without any 
evasion, equivocation or mental reserva- 
tion — under no less penalty than to have 
his body cut across, his bowels taken out 
and burnt to ashes, and those ashes scat- 
tered to the four winds of heaven; to 
have his body dissected into four equal 
parts, and those parts hung on the cardi- 
nal points of the compass, there to hang 
and remain as a terror to all those who 
shall presume to violate the sacred obli- 
gation of a Master Mason." 

Col. Stone in his seventh letter, page 
67, says, that in his apprehension the 
words, "and they left to my own elec- 
tion," are an innovation, and that he has 
not been accustomed to hear the obliga- 
tion so conferred. The words in his own 
manuscript are "and those in my option" ; 
fewer words, but bearing the same mean- 
ing. They were no innovation at Roch- 
ester. 

The only words in this obligation 
which need any explanation, are the 
words cable-tow, and they are always so 
explained as to give them a definite 
meaning. The rest are all as explicit as 
language can make them, and they are 
taken with a broad and total disclaimer 



of all evasion, equivocation or mental 
reservation. So they were taken at Roch- 
ester, and so they are recorded in the old 
manuscript of Col. Stone. 

You are a classical scholar, sir, and 
you doubtless remember the humorous 
remark of Cicero, in his dialogue on the 
nature of the gods; that he could not 
conceive how one Roman Haruspex 
could look another in the face without 
laughing. I find it difficult to conceive 
how you, performing the functions of a 
master of a lodge, as among the duties of 
a grand high-priest you may be required 
to do — how you can look in the face of a 
man after administering to him such an 
oath as this, without shuddering. But 
we have not yet done with the old manu- 
script of Col. Stone. 

After the ceremonies of admission to 
the degree of Master Mason are com- 
pleted, and the recipient has been in- 
vested in his new dignity he is conducted 
to the master of the lodge in the East, 
there to hear from him the history of 
the degree. There, sir, with equal regard 
for historical truth and reverence for the 
Holy Scriptures, you mingle up the 
building of King Solomon's Temple, as 
recorded in the Bible, with the murder of 
Hiram Abiff by three Tyrian Fellow- 
craft, Jubela, Jubelo and Jubelum, as pre- 
served in the chronicles of Masonic mys- 
tery. You relate them all as solemn 
truth of equal authenticity, and in the 
manuscript now before me, the story goes 
that after the murder of Hiram Abifr" 
was consummated, King Solomon was 
informed of the conspiracy, and ordered 
the roll to be called, when the three 
ruffians were missing. Search "was made 
after them, and they were found by their 
dolorous moans, in a cave. Oh, said Ju- 
bela, that my throat had been cut across, 
etc. (repeating the whole penalty of the 
Entered Apprentice's obligation) before 
I had been accessory to death of so good 
a master. Oh, said Jubelo, that my heart 
had been torn out, etc. (repeating the 
whole penalty of the Fellowcraft's obli- 
gation) before I had been accessory to 
the death of our master. Oh, said Jube- 
lum, that my body were cut across, my 
bowels taken out and burnt to ashes, 
etc. (repeating the whole penalty of 
the Master Mason's obligation) before I 
had been the death of our Master Hiram 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



175 



Abiff. They were then taken, and sent 
to Hiram, king of Tyre, who executed 
on them the several sentences they had 
invoked upon themselves," which have 
ever since rcmaind "the standing penal- 
ties in the three first degrees in Mason- 
ry:' 

This, sir, is the history of the Master. 
Mason's degree, which was delivered by 
the master of the lodge at Rochester to 
every individual received as a Master 
Mason. This was the explanation given 
to him of the obligation assumed by him, 
immediately after the administration of 
the oath. This is in substance the ex- 
planation which you, the reporter of a 
criminal code to the legislature of Lou- 
isiana must give to every Master Mason 
whom you receive, of the penalty of the 
oath which you administer to him in the 
name of the ever-living God — without 
evasion — without equivocation — without 
mental reservation. 

And will you say, sir, as the grand 
lodge of Rhode Island has said, that 
these penalties mean no more than that 
the swearer, who invokes them upon him- 
self will rather die like Hiram Abiff, 
than reveal the secrets of Masonry? Is 
it Hiram Abiff in this story who pays the 
penalty of violated vows? Is it Hiram 
Abiff who invokes these penalties upon 
himself? The Entered Apprentice, the 
Fellowcraft and the Master Mason, in- 
voke upon themselves the penalties of 
their respective degrees. The Entered 
Apprentice is told that he enters the 
lodge on the point of a naked sword 
pricking his breast, to remind him of 
instant death in case of revolt ; and the 
Master Mason is told that the penalties 
executed upon Jubela, Jubelo and Jube- 
lum, have ever since remained the stand- 
ing penalties in the three first degrees of 
Masonry. 

And now, sir, what are we to think of 
high-priests, and Royal Arch chapters, 
and grand masters, and grand lodges, 
who after taking and administering in 
secret these oaths, with these penalties, 
for a long series of years, when their real 
character has been proclaimed by the 
voice of midnight murder from the wa- 
ters of Niagara in tones to which the 
thunders of her cataract are but as a 
whisper — when their unequivocal import 
has been divulged, to the amazement and 



disgust and horror of all pure, unsophis- 
ticated minds ; what are we to think of 
high-priests, and grand kings, and most 
illustrious Knights of the Cross, who 
face it out in defiance of the common 
sense and common feeling of mankind, 
that there is nothing in these oaths and 
penalties inconsistent with the duties of 
those who take and administer them, to 
their country or their God? The manu- 
script from which I now give to the 
world the three obligations of the En- 
tered Apprentice, of the Fellowcraft, and 
of the Master Mason, is upon the testi- 
mony of Col. Stone, a Knight Templar, 
and a man of unimpeached integrity, ma- 
sonry in its most mitigated and least ex- 
ceptionable form, — it was the masonry of 
Connecticut more than twenty-five years 
since and for many years before, — it was 
the masonry of Rochester at the time of 
the murder of Morgan. 

I have yet more to say to you, sir, on 
this subject, nor shall I be discouraged 
from continuing to address you upon it 
by your observance of a "dignified si- 
lence." If my letters are not read by 
you, there are those by whom they will 
be read, I trust, not without effect. If 
the presses under your jurisdiction, Ma- 
sonic or political, refuse their columns to 
the discussion of Masonic morals, when 
the grand high-priest of Masonry is the 
secretary of state of the Union, it may 
serve to illustrate the subserviency of the 
periodical press to Masonry — but your 
address to your companions and brethren 
at your installation as the grand high- 
priest of the Royal Arch of this Union. 
is not the perishable effusion of a day. It 
is a state paper for history, and for biog- 
raphy — for the present age and for the 
next — it shall not be lost to posterity — it 
shall stand as a beacon to future time — 
the admiration, or at least the wonder of 
other generations. 

John Quincy Adams. 



EJECTED FROM CAMP. 
"The War Department recently issued 
an order which practically excludes 
camp pastors from the training camps. 
This order, if carried into effect, practi- 
cally ends a most vital and effective ser- 
vice. It means that the churches shall 
have no means of ministering directly to 
their people in the camps. It means thr 



176 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October. 1918 



beginning of an official and state religion 
in the army. . . . That our Protestant 
boys cannot have a minister of their own 
faith with them to Consult, when Roman 
Catholics are holding their own services 
in the halls of the Knights of Columbus 
in Army camps and cantonments, is al- 
most beyond belief. If our Protestant 
boys can have no spiritual adviser other 
than the Army chaplains, why should the 
Roman Catholic boys be privileged to 
have their priests minister to them in the 
halls of the Knights of Columbus? 

"The religious care of our boys ought 
not to be left exclusively to chaplains 
representing Protestants, Romanists, 
Jews, Christian Scientists, Mormons, and 
God only knows who else. When our 
churches here at home are willing to put 
into the camps our ablest preachers, why 
should these men be excluded ? . . . If 
the government fears the sectarian influ- 
ence of camp pastors, why does it not 
fear the sectarian influence of the 
Knights of Columbus? We protest that 
it is undemocratic and un-American for 
Roman Catholic priests to be made wel- 
come in the camps while Protestant pas- 
tors are excluded." — Watchman-Exam- 
iner, August 29. 



A SEVENTEEN FIFTY-SEVEN 
EXPOSURE. 

The following action of the Associate 
Presbyterian Synod is taken from "The His- 
tory of Masonry," a Masonic publication 
printed more than a century and a half ago 
and now in the possession of the Editor. Tts 
age accounts for the quaint expressions and 
unusual spellings. "Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masonry" had its origin in London 
in 1717. As early as 1745 its obligations were 
public property of this Presbyterian Synod 
and the occasion of Church discipline. The 
oaths and obligations of Masonry were pub- 
lished in Scots Magazine in 1755, page 133. — 
Editor. 

Acts of the Associate Presbyterian Synod, 
1745-1755, Concerning the Masonic Oath. 

Whereas an oath is one of the most 
solemn acts of religious worship, which 
ought to be taken only upon important 
and necessary occasions ; and to be 
sworn in truth, in judgment and in 
righteousness, without any mixture of 
sinful, profane or superstitious devices ; 

And whereas the synod had laid be- 
fore them, in their meeting at Stirling, 
on the 7th of March, 1745, an overture 
concerning the Mason Oath, bearing, 



that there were very strong presump- 
tions, that among Masons an oath of 
secrecy is administered to intrants into 
their society, even under a capital pen- 
alty, and before any of those things 
which they swear to keep secret be re- 
vealed to them; artd that they pretend 
to take some of these secrets from the 
Bible ; beside other things which are 
ground of scruple in the manner of 
swearing the said oath ; and therefore 
overturing that the synod would con- 
sider the whole affair, and give direc- 
tions with regard to the admission of 
persons engaged in that oath to sealing 
ordinances ; 

And whereas the synod, in their meet- 
ing at Stirling, on the 26th of September, 
1745, remitted the overture concerning 
the Mason oath, to the several sessions 
subordinate to them, for their proceed- 
ing therein, as far as they should find 
practicable, according to our received 
and known principles, and the plain rules 
of the Lord's Word, and found reason : 

And whereas the synod, in their meet- 
ing at Edinburgh, on the 6th of March, 
1755, when a particular cause about the 
Mason oath was before them, did ap- 
point all the sessions under their inspec- 
tion, to require all persons in their re- 
spective congregations, who were pre- 
sumed or suspected to have been en- 
gaged in that oath, to make a plain 
acknowledgement, whether or not they 
have ever been so; and to require that 
such as they may find to have been en- 
gaged therein, should give ingenious 
answers to what further inquiry the 
sessions may see cause to make, concern- 
ing the tenor and administration of the 
said oath to them ; and that the sessions 
should proceed to the purging of what 
scandel thev may thus find those persons 
convicted of, according to the directions 
of the above mentioned act of synod in 
September, 1745. 

And whereas the generality of the ses- 
sions have, since the aforementioned 
periods, dealt with several persons under 
their inspection about the Mason oath ; in 
the course of which procedure, by the 
concessions made to them, thev have 
fotmd others, besides those of the Ma- 
sonic craft, to be involved in that oath : 
and the synod finding it proper and 
necessary to give more particular direc- 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



177 



tions to the several sessions, for having 
the hainous profanation of the Lord's 
name by that oath purged out of all 
the congregations under their inspection. 

Therefore, the synod did, and hereby 
do appoint that the several sessions sub- 
ordinate to them, in dealing with per- 
sons about the Masonic oath, shall par- 
ticularly interrogate them, — if they have 
taken that oath, and when and where 
they did so? If they have taken the 
said oath, or declared their approbation 
of it, oftener than once, upon being ad- 
mitted to a higher degree in a Mason 
lodge. If that oath was not adminis- 
tered to them without letting them know 
the terms of it, till in the act of admin- 
istering the same to them? If it was not 
an oath binding them to keep a number 
of secrets, none of which they are 
allowed to know before swearing the 
oaths? If, beside a solemn invocation 
of the Lord's name in that oath, it did 
not contain a capital penalty about hav- 
ing their tongues and hearts taken out 
in case of breaking the same? If the 
said oath was not administered to them 
with several superfluous ceremonies, 
such as the stripping them of or requir- 
ing them to deliver up anything of metal 
which they had upon them, and making 
them kneel upon their right knee bare, 
holding up their right arm bare, with the 
elbow upon the Bible, or with the Bible 
laid before them ; or having the Bible, 
as also the Square and compasses, in 
some particular way applied to their 
bodies? And, if among the secrets which 
they were bound by the oath to keep, 
there was not a passage of Scripture 
read to them, particularly I Kings, VII, 
21, with or without some explication put 
upon the same, for being concealed? 

Moreover, the synod appoint, that the 
several sessions shall call before them 
all persons in their congregation who are 
of the Mason craft, and others whom 
they have a particular suspicion of, as 
being involved in the Mason oath, ex- 
cept such as have been already dealt 
with and have given satisfaction upon 
that head; and that, upon their answer- 
ing the first of the foregoing questions 
in the affirmative, the sessions shall pro- 
ceed to put the other interrogatories be- 
fore appointed ; as also, that all persons 
of the Mason craft, applying for sealing 



ordinances, and likewise others concern- 
ing whom there may be any presump- 
tion of their having been involved in the 
Mason oaths, shall be examined by the 
ministers if they have been so; and upon 
their acknowledging the same, or de- 
clining to answer whether or not, the • 
ministers shall refer them to be dealt 
with by the session, before admitting 
them to these ordinances ; and that all 
such persons offering themselves to the 
sessions for joining in convenanting 
work, shall be thus examined by the ses- 
sions as to their concern in the aforesaid 
oath. 

And the synod further appoint, that 
when persons are found to be involved 
in the Mason oath, according to their 
concessions in giving plain and particu- 
lar answers to the foregoing questions 
and professing their sorrow for the 
same; the said scandal shall be purged 
by a sessional rebuke and admonition, 
with a strict charge to abstain from all 
concern afterwards in administering the 
said oath to any, or enticing any into the 
snare, and from all practices of amus- 
ing people about the pretended mysteries 
of their signs and secrets. But that per- 
sons who shall refuse, or shift to give 
plain and particular answers to the fore- 
going questions, shall be reputed under 
scandal, incapable of admission to seal- 
ing ordinances, till they answer and give 
satisfaction as before appointed. 

And the synod refer to the several 
sessions to proceed unto higher censure 
as they shall see cause, in the case of 
persons whom they may find involved in 
the said oath with special aggravation, 
as taking or relapsing into the same, in 
opposition to warning's against doing so. 

And the synod appoint, that each of 
the sessions under their inspection shall 
have an extract of this act, to be inserted 
in their books, for executing the same 
accordingly. 

First published in The Scots Maga- 
zine, Edinburgh. Scotland, August 2=,, 
*757- 



BIBLE FAITH ILLUSTRATED. 

What is the difference between belief 
and unbelief, or faith and infidelity? 

The Bible meaning of faith and belief 
is that act or attitude which receives the 
Word of God at its face value. 



178 



CHRISTIAN CY.NOSURE 



October, 1918 



Abraham believed God when God told 
him he would have a son from Sarah, his 
wife, and she was nienty years old, and 
according to all natural law this was an 
impossibility, yet Abraham believed God 
and thus became the father of the faith- 
ful or of the sons of faith. 

Now, unbelief or infidelity would be- 
lieve God so long as the wife was young 
and it could account by known laws for 
all that was to happen. Unbelief lives 
on comprehensible facts, and what it can- 
not comprehend it cannot believe. 

The difference in faith and unbelief is 
well seen in the story of Jonah and the 
fish. The Bible declares that God pre- 
pared a great fish to swallow Jonah, and 
every person who had faith believed it. 
But for hundreds of years scientific men 
and critics could not find any fish large 
enough to swallow a man, so they did not 
believe the testimony of God concerning 
Jonah. In later years fish have been cap- 
tured which can easily swallow a man, in 
fact their stomachs contained animals of 
the sea which they had swallowed much 
larger than an ordinary man, and now 
these scientists and critics believe the 
story of Jonah. But that belief is not 
faith, nor is it the kind of belief that is 
meant when the Bible speaks of believ- 
ing. 

Knowledge is a splendid thing, but it is 
also very dangerous ; like high explo- 
sives, very good to those who use them 
rightly, but very destructive when wrong- 
ly used. Any one who has learned to be- 
lieve God cannot get too much knowl- 
edge, but the person who has not believed 
God's testimony concerning His Son 
Jesus Christ, learning soon makes him to 
be like a child with an open razor, verv 
dangerous to all his companions as well 
as to himself. 

Tf we believe God only when we see 
good proof for what He says, we rob 
ourselves of the chance to exercise faith. 

Some years ago a man, desiring to il- 
lustrate what faith is, rented a small of- 
fice and placed a sign on the outside 
which read : "All men who are in debt 
come in between twelve and one o'clock 
and I will pay your debts." Many went 
by Who were in debt and read the sign. 
They stopped and talked with each other 
as to this unheard of thing, and what 
kind of 4rick is this man playing. When 



the hour was half gone a man passed by 
who was in great financial stress. He 
saw the sign and entered. "What do you 
want?" he was asked. "I read the sign 
outside and came in to see if I could get 
help," was the reply. "Are you in debt?" 
"Yes, sir." "How much?" "Three hun- 
dred dollars." A check was written out 
and handed to the man, who thanked his 
benefactor and started to leave. "Hold 
on," said the man ; "sit down till one 
o'clock." When the hour arrived he was 
told to go in peace. As he came from 
the office he was greeted from every side 
with the words, "Did you get your 
money?" "Yes," said the happy man, 
showing his check. There was a mad 
rush for the door, now these men be- 
lieved the sign, but it was too late ; doubt 
had robbed belief of her virtue, and also 
of her reward. It is just so with thou- 
sands today. They come rushing to God 
with a great pack of profound knowledge 
and observation and are turned away 
empty, while here and there one comes 
to God in simple faith and goes away 
full. This is the difference between faith 
and unbelief. 

What is the difference between a scien- 
tist and a Christian? Well, a scientist is 
a person who is seeking the cause of the 
wonderful things in the world, and a 
Christian is a person who has sought and 
found that cause (for he has found 
God), and is really a graduate from the 
school of science, for he has what the 
other fellow is hunting for. 



P. A. Klein. 



Seattle, Wash. 



"PRECEPT UPON PRECEPT." 

BY REV. H. M. BISSELL. 

Let me quote from a letter just re- 
ceived. I can vouch for its truthfulness. 

"A young man of this city [Cleveland, 
Ohio] in conversation about becoming a 
Christian said to me: Tf a man lives up 
to the ideals of Masonry, he cannot better 
fulfill his duty to his country, his God, 
or his fellow-man.' I expressed surprise 
'Yes,' said he, 'Masonry is my religion, 
and there is no higher type.' " Another 
instance was in our meetings, week be- 
fore last. I asked a man who seemed to 
be under great mental strain, why he 
would not become a Christian, and he 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



179 



gave as his reason, that he is a lodge 
member. 

The above, with numerous similar 
cases well known suggests the question : 
Does Masonry offer ground for such be- 
lief among unconverted masons? The 
open works of such men as Mackey, 
Morris, Town, Sickles and Chase — Ma- 
sonic authorities of highest repute, shall 
answer. 

Mackey (Lexicon of Freemasonry, p. 
404) says: "The religion of Masonry is 
pure theism on which its different mem- 
bers engraft their own peculiar opin- 
ions." Same author, in "The Ritualist" 
(p. 22) "* * * initiation is a type of 
the new life upon which the candidate 
is about to enter. * * * He comes 
inquiringly to our doors, seeking the new 
birth, and asking a withdrawal of the 
veil which conceals divine truth from his 
uninitiated sight." Speaking of the 
Gavel (p.* 38), "We as Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, are taught to make use 
of it * * * fitting our minds as liv- 
ing stones, for that spiritual building, 
that house not made with hands, eternal 
in the heavens." Again, on page 109, 
"By its legend and all its ritual [i. e., 
that of Masonry] it is implied that we 
have been redeemed from the death of 
sin and the sepulchre of pollution. The 
life of man, regulated by morality, faith 
[in Masonry, not in Christ] and justice 
will be rewarded at its closing hour by 
the prospect of eternal bliss." In the 
burial service (p. 238) "And may 
Almighty God * * * extend his 
mercy to him and all of us, and crown 
our hope with everlasting bliss in realms 
of boundless eternity." 

The foregoing soul-saving claims of 
Masonry can be buttressed from the 
author mentioned, whenever space and 
time shall permit. 

Now we hardly need say that the re- 
ligion of Masonry is not Christian. "Pure 
theism" says Mackey. In "Webb's Ma- 
sonic Monitor," p. 284, article "Re- 
ligion," that renowned Mason, Robert 
Morris, tells us that "So broad is the re- 
ligion of Masonry * * * that the 
Christian, the Jew, the Mohammedan, 
may and do harmoniously combine 
* * * with the Buddhist, the Parsee, 
the Confucian, and the worshipers of 
Deity under every form." Open "Chase's 



Digest of Masonic Law" on page 206, 
"It is anti-masonic to require any re- 
ligious test, other than the candidate 
should believe in a God, the Creator." 
Idem, page 208, "Freemasonry calls no 
man to account for his belief of any re- 
ligion on the globe." Same page, "The 
religious views of a candidate are not to 
be regarded at all. It is sufficient if he 
believes in the existence and providence 
of God." Chase does quote a few con- 
trary opinions on this point, but such 
are overwhelmingly overruled and "re- 
jected" by those sustaining the position 
above cited. 

A sample of Masonry's use of Scrip- 
ture, with Christ left out, is found in 
"The Freemason's Monitor" (Sickles), 
part II, pages 50 and 51. Compare the 
passage there used (2nd Thes. 3 :6-i6) 
with your Bibles, verses 6 and 12, and 
see how the words "in the name of our 
Lord Jesus Christ" are twice omitted. 
Except in the highly objectionable rites 
of the 12th (Knight Templar) Degree. 
Christ is not in the Masonic ritual and 
practice. It offers "redemption from the 
death of sin," it offers eternal bliss" 
without Christ. Read Mackey's defini- 
tion of "Acacian" (Lexicon, p. 16), "a 
term signifying a Mason, who by living 
in strict obedience to the obligations and 
precepts of the fraternity" [mark you] 
"is free from sin." So when he dies 
scatter acacia, emblem of innocence, over 
his remains, and send his soul to the 
Grand Lodge above. Masonically freed 
from sin, he needs no Savior ! ! ! 

Brethren of the Christian name, Satan 
is a hunter after souls. Think you he is 
disturbed, on looking into a Masonic 
lodge, when he sees Christian men at 
"work" on the religio-masonic platform 
outlined by the writers above quoted, or 
may he be well pleased ? 

The great question is not, What can 
the Christian Mason read into the ritual 
and teachings of his order, but rather, 
What does the impenitent Mason really 
find there? Masonic authorities have 
answered, and the following propositions 
may se set down: 1st. Masonry without 
Christ does offer salvation. 2d. Many 
souls lean on this Masonic hope. 3d. 
The Bible makes it plain that salvation 
is through Christ alone. 

If a resident of Corning, California, 



180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October, 1918 



should seriously tell us that there are no 
mountains on either side of our valley, 
we should be surprised, then pained. If 
he persisted in such a denial we might 
say, Poor fellow ! How long has he 
been this way? 

The truth of the above propositions 
are in plain sight, and are as immovable 
as are the mountains around about us. 

Corning, California. 

THE LIFE OF A MORMON GIRL. 

(Concluded.) 
When I was about twelve years old my 
father came home one day and told my 
mother that the Lord had revealed to him 
his duty ; that he must take another wife. 
More children were needed in the King- 
dom, and he had been brought by Divine 
instruction to accept his duty more seri- 
ously. My mother was setting the table 
for dinner. I was just outside the door 
in the kitchen. I heard a cup and saucer 
drop and break, and I came into the room 
to see what had happened. My mother's 
face frightened me. I cannot tell you 
how it looked, white lips and all. She 
was not looking at my father, but out of 
the door into the sunshine. She stood 
rigid and terrible. I burst out crying and 
threw my arms about her body and 
looked up into her face: "What is it? 
What is it?" I cried. She did not an- 
swer, but I felt her limbs tremble. Some 
way I knew who had hurt her. I un- 
clasped my arms and rushed over to my 
father and struck him again and again 
with my child fists. Not one thought of 
how good he was, how kind he was, how 
he played with us ; not one memory of all 
that came to me. I could have killed him 
if my blind, unknowing rage had had the 
strength. My mother said: ''Mary!" 
and I fell to the floor crying. My father 
bent over me. "Don't touch her," said 
my mother fiercely. Then she lifted me 
and took me into the kitchen and held 
me on her lap until I stopped crying. I 
did not dare to ask her to tell me what 
had happened. I knew. And she, the 
silent woman, never said a word to me. 
The younger children did not guess it, 
did not notice that something had left the 
house where we lived. I knew that my 
mother had seen it pass through the door 
into the sunshine when she dropped the 
cup and saucer. I watched her every 



day; she grew listless and tired and did 
not seem to take any interest in our plays, 
although she seemed more tender when 
we came to her for comfort. One day I 
came into the kitchen where she sat at 
the table. She did not hear me. Sud- 
denly she buried her face in her arms. 
"O God!" she moaned, "why do I suffer 
so?" I slipped away and ran to the 
bushes, where we had a bower for a play- 
house. I stayed there all the rest of the 
afternoon alone. When I heard the oth- 
ers coming from school I ran into the 
vegetable cellar and stayed until I heard 
my mother calling me. I was only twelve 
years old, but I was never a child again 
after that day. 

My experience was not an unusual 
one. Many, many of the children of 
Utah learned their first lesson in the love 
of man and woman, came to recognize 
the bond that existed between father and 
mother, only when the bong was being 
severed. At that time I did not know 
what it was that hurt my mother. I only 
knew who had hurt her. After that day 
I used to watch my father furtively, ex- 
pecting at any moment some revelation 
of unkindness or cruelty. But he was 
the same, except that he seemed to want 
us children to be about whenever he was 
in the house. I can see now that he must 
have been afraid of my mother's silence. 
He knew she was a good Mormon, that 
she was "wrestling with a sense of sin," 
that she would soon grow used to the 
thought of his "duty" toward the future; 
but he was, nevertheless, a little uncom- 
fortable. 

It was not long after that my father 
brought home his second wife. He 
brought her to the house when we were 
waiting supper. We had been dressed as 
though for the Tabernacle, but mother 
had not told us why. When the door 
opened and the new wife came in I 
thought it was some stranger from the 
way my mother went up and shook hands 
with her, and I was very much surprised 
when I saw that it was Miss Ellen, one 
of the ward school teachers. 

"This is your Aunt Ellen," said 
mother, and we shook hands. Then we 
knew, for all the other children called 
their father's other wives aunts. I can- 
not remember what any one said, but I 
do recall that at supper my father 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



181 



laughed a good deal. My mother sat at 
the head of the table as usual; the first 
wife always kept that place no matter 
how many wives came after her. 

Another farm, a "ranch," was soon 
bought for Aunt Ellen's home. But, of 
course, when she went away my father 
went with her for a while and it seemed, 
very strange at home without him. In 
those days he had never been away ex- 
cept for short trips into some canon. 
Now lie began to go away for a week at 
a time. When I was about seventeen I 
was considered old enough to prepare for 
the ceremonies of the endowment. There 
were ten girls in my Sunday school class, 
and we were told that on a certain day 
we would go into the Endowment House 
We were not told what was to happen 
there. W T e knew that the older women 
had been in that sacred place, but that 
they never spoke of it, not even to one 
another. We knew that the mothers of 
the ten girls were preparing special gar- 
ments' for the ceremony, but we were not 
allowed to see them. It was very mys- 
terious to most of the girls ; they spoke 
of the coming day in whispers. I was 
not so much impressed as the rest ; I was 
simply curious. 

To-day the ceremonies of the endow T - 
ment, of the sealing to living and dead 
husbands and the baptism for the dead 
all take place in the Temple itself, which 
at that time was but partially built. On 
the day of the ceremony my sister and I 
were received there in company with the 
other girls by several older women in the 
Endowment House. One at a time we 
were taken into the room in which the 
first degree was given. This ceremony, 
as I remember it, consisted of getting 
ready for the second degree, the cleans- 
ing bath. I was supported in a horizon- 
tal position in the water and one of the 
women repeated the words of the degree : 
"I wash you that you may be able to 
perform the work assigned to you : 
your eyes that you may see the glory 
of God ; your ears that you may hear 
His voice ; your mouth that you may 
speak for His praise ; your breast that 
you may nourish the children He gives 
you ; your loins that you may bear 
strong children ; your feet that you 
may be swift to win the race." 
I may not have quoted exactly, for I 



heard the words so many years ago, but 
I have given the substance. I was taken 
from the bath and dried and given a 
loose, white slip. On this slip was em- 
broidered a compass over the knee, signi- 
fying that we should be willing to bow- 
before the Lord, and a square over the 
left breast, signifying the protection of 
the Lord. Then 1 put on a white apron 
reaching to my knees ; this was embroid- 
ered with fig leaves. Over the slip and 
apron I put on a long, full white gar- 
ment, held in about the waist by a white 
girdle. One of the women then poured 
perfumed oil on the top of my head and 
called me "The anointed of the Lord," 
and gave me a secret name which was 
never to be spoken until I reached the 
entrance to the Celestial Kingdom, 
where I should find one who knew me by 
that name. I was not at all impressed 
by the ceremony so far, and I was very 
much disappointed with the name they 
gave me. My grandfather's spirit must 
have been strong in me that day, for as 
I went on through the other degrees I 
was on the verge of laughter. But I did 
not dare laugh for the older women were 
so serious, and when I met the other 
girls in the room of the third degree they 
looked awestruck and frightened. 

This room was darkened, and then we 
heard a man's voice repeating the first 
chapter in Genesis, only, instead of say- 
ing ''And God said," he took the part of 
the Lord and spoke in the first person, 
when he said, "Let there be light." The 
room got brighter and we could see a 
man lying on the floor ; it was Adam, 
dressed in white and apparently asleep. 
The voice woke Adam up, and after a 
while a woman came in and the voice 
said: "This is woman, thy companion." 
She was about fifty and dressed in a 
white Swiss, cut in the fashion of the 
day — that is, our day not Eve's. The 
two were shown into the Garden of 
Eden, which was a place under a tree in 
a box. Here, after a while, the Devil 
came in, a man with a few raisins, in- 
stead of the apple. Eve ate them and 
then she and Adam hid behind the tree 
in the box. After a moment the Lord 
came in and drove them out of the Gar- 
den. That was the end of the fourth 
degree. 

The fifth degree showed us many men 



182 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October. 1918 



walking about and the Devil was calling 
them "Methodist," "Presbyterian" and 
"Episcopalian," and so on, and making 
fun of them. That was supposed to 
show us that all other sects except the 
Mormon were in the power of Satan. It 
did not mean much to me, for I had 
never made any careful study of the dif- 
ferent kinds of heathen. I had thought 
of them all as one people. 

It was in the next room that I began 
to feel serious. No one who has taken 
the sixth degree can ever forget it; it is 
made too serious. I was only a girl and 
knew practically nothing outside of the 
State of Deseret, but I was startled by 
the oath I took. Had it been ten years 
or fifteen years later and had I met the 
Gentiles and found them quite different 
from the heathen I had been told of, I 
could not have taken the oath. As it 
was, I took it in ignorance upon the 
Bible, the Book of Mormon and the Book 
of the Covenants, which were piled one 
on the other upon a table. I took an oath 
of enmity to the nation and of secrecy. 
If I remember aright these were the 
words said to me : 

"You solemnly swear, in the pres- 
ence of Almighty God, His angels and 
these witnesses that you will from this 
forth and forever begin and carry out 
hostilities against this nation and teach 
it to your children ; and to keep the 
same intent a profound secret now and 
forever ; so help you God !" 
The hostility toward the United States 
was explained on the ground that it was 
necessary to avenge the murder of Jo- 
seph Smith. 

The penalty for revealing this secret 
was likewise repeated by us. Did we re- 
veal this oath we were subject to the ven- 
geance of the church; we would be dis- 
emboweled, our tongues would be cut 
out and our bodies dismembered. 
[Copied from Masonry.] 

The penalty, it is said, has been paid 
more than once. 

One of the girls did not go back with 
us to the room we had first entered ; she 
was a girl of nineteen or twenty who had 
worked for Aunt Ellen on the ranch. 
We were wondering where she had gone, 
when one of the older women came" into 
the room where we were dressing to go 
home and said to my sister and me : 



"Hurry, girls, if you want to see your 
father marry Eliza. I will take you in." 

My sister and I looked at each other; 
we had not had a hint of such a thing. 
We knew that our mother had known 
nothing of it when she kissed us good- 
bye at the door of the Endowment 
House. My sister burst into tears. At first 
she refused to go back but the women 
persuaded her she should go to show that 
she trusted the teaching of the church. 
She was reminded of the necessity of the 
Kingdom ; all the religious superstition 
that she had in her nature was called to 
the surface; and she went to the marriage 
ceremony in a state of hysterical exalta- 
tion. That is the way the church worked 
upon the superstition and nerves and in- 
nocence of the girls. 

I went, too, but in anger. 

In the room where the ceremony was 
being performed Brigham Young sat at 
the head of a long table. On one side of 
the table kneeled my father, on the other 
Eliza. They held hands over the top of 
the table while Brigham Young spoke the 
words of the marriage service. What he 
said — I was too angry to hear anything. 
To be sure, I had been taught to believe 
in the polygamous custom ; I knew noth- 
ing else ; yet instinctively I was outraged. 
I felt a contempt for the ceremony going 
on. I would not look at the two kneeling 
figures. 

When we got home we found mother 
pacing the floor, the tears rolling down 
her cheeks. Father had stopped at the 
house on his way from the ranch and 
told her, just after we left. My anger 
was still with me, and I turned against 
my own mother: 

"Why do you stay here? Why didn't 
you go to the Endowment House and 
stop the marriage if it hurts you?" I 
said. I did not think of any other way 
out. 

It was soon after this that I got hold 
of some "heathen" books. "Charlotte 
Temple" and "Children of the Abbey." I 
read them with eagerness, although not 
quite understanding. The romance in 
them conquered me. And when the Gen- 
tiles began to come into Salt Lake City I 
found they were not the people I had 
been taught to believe them. The officers 
who were stationed at Fort Douglas used 
to come into town at the invitations of 



October, 1918 



HR1ST1AN CYNOSURE 



183 



the heads of the church ; they were often 
invited to our balls and introduced to us 
— for policy's sake, I believe. But we 
were not allowed to speak to them the 
next time we met them on the street, and 
we were riot allowed to invite them to 
our homes. Besides the military Gen- 
tiles, there were the men who were on 
their way to California and young men 
who for one reason or another wanted to 
settle in Salt Lake itself. 

There were some tragedies connected 
with these. My most intimate friend, the 
daughter of a man high in the church, 
was a very beautiful girl. At the balls 
she was most popular with the Gentiles 
because of her beauty and her charm. 
One of the outsiders began to show her' 
very marked attention. We all noticed 
it. I began to plan that she should run 
away with him. One day she came to 
me in tears : 

"Mary," she said, "father wants me to 
marry Mr. ," naming a man promi- 
nent in the church. "He wants to marry 
me right away." 

1 was not surprised, but I tried to get 
her to refuse. Her father had no doubt 
felt the danger in her attraction for the 
heathen. He had used the old argu- 
ments : her "duty" to the "Kingdom," 
her hope of being "a queen in the Celes- 
tial Kingdom," her love of him. Nothing 
I could say could offset his influence. 
She became the second wife of the man 
her father had chosen. The young Gen- 
tile left town. That is only one story, 
and not an unusual one ; it shows how the 
Church guarded the girls, driving them 
into polgamy. Once in, they had de- 
stroyed their future. 

The women of Utah have often been 
accused of cowardice. They may have 
been cowards, but it must be remembered 
that the older ones had chosen a religion 
which bound them just as the Catholic 
religion, the Methodist religion, the 
Quaker religion have bound generations 
of women. A plural wife, even a first 
wife, might discover her degradation if 
she were not deluded by the cloak of 
false spirituality that was offered. But 
what was there for the disillusion ? She 
never had any property of her own ; she 
could not leave on a train for the East or 
West without endangering her life. She 
would be uriclassed when she reached the 



Gentile world. And then there were her 
children, for the disillusionment seldom 
came before the first child. You can un- 
derstand, too, that when she had seen 
how she was caught in the system she 
would keep quiet and was not likely to 
let others know that she felt degraded. 

Later, when the Gentiles became 
stronger, the Mormon mothers some- 
times helped the girls to marry outside 
the church. One woman, whose daugh- 
ter had married and gone East, was con- 
fronted by a churchman. 

"Don't you know," said the polyga- 
mist, "that your daughter will go to 
hell ?" 

"Well," said the taunted mother, "per- 
haps she will. But I have seen to it that 
she goes as a first-class -passenger. She 
will be comfortable on the way, at least !" 

That there was outspoken discontent 
was proved by the necessity that Brig- 
ham Young felt one time when he 
preached to the women. I heard him 
preach to women more than once in this 
vein. On this occasion I particularly re- 
call he offered to set all the women at 
liberty. He stood in his insolence behind 
the pulpit and said : 

"Now for my proposition : It is fre- 
quently happening that women say they 
are unhappy. Men will say : 'My wife, 
though a most excellent woman, has not 
seen a happy day since I took my second 
wife.' T wish my own women to under- 
stand that what I am going to say is for 
them as well as for others. I am going 
to set every woman at liberty and say to 



11 



lem : 



'N 



ow go your way ! my women 



with the rest — go your way ! Now my 
wives have got to do one of two things, 
either round up their shoulders to endure 
the afflictions of this world and live their 
religion or they may leave ; for I will not 
have them about me. I will go to heaven 
alone rather than have scratching and 
righting around me ! I know what my 
women will say. They will say : 'You 
can have as many women as you please, 
Brigham.' " 

Xo commentary need be made on these 
statements of Brigham Young, the presi- 
dent of the church of the Latter-Day 
Saints. They show not only the man but 
the official. 

Then, as he offered the women their 
liberty, he said : "There is no cessation 



184 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October, 1918 



to the everlasting whining of many of 
the women in this territory. And if the 
women will turn from the command- 
ments of God and continue to despise the 
order of heaven I will pray that the curse 
of the Almighty may be close to their 
heels and it may be following them all 
the day long! And those that enter into 
it (the order of heaven) I will promise 
that they shall be queens of heaven and 
rule to all eternity." 

Many of those who had heard him 
knew that liberty had nothing for them, 
while bondage had at least its common 
miseries and they tried to believe in that 
promise of eternal happiness. 

I never went to hear a sermon if I 
could help it after that. I began to make 
friends with the Gentiles. I read every- 
thing I could get hold of. I planned to 
go and teach school somewhere where 
the church could not put its heavy hand 
upon me. And while I was all eagerness 
to go, I met a man who had just come 
from the East, the mysterious land of 
freedom. We began to be very good 
friends, and I told him that I was going 
to leave Salt Lake. He said he would 
help me, and my heart grew lighter. 
Then it was I fell in love with him and 
he with me. He wanted to plan for both 
of us ; his stay in Salt Lake would be 
short. We would get married the day he 
was to leave. I entered my Promised 
Land when he planned my life, and we 
became engaged. No one knew we were 
in love with each other; we took pains 
to conceal that, but he would see me 
home from the parties and the concerts. 
That made people talk, and one of the 
teachers of the church came to me to see 
if I was not ready to be "sealed" to a cer- 
tain prominent man who had asked my 
father for me. 

He had two wives, this man, and in my 
new-found happiness the thought of be- 
ing a third wife made me laugh. I was 
flippant, until I perceived that the digni- 
fied "teacher" (a man with four wives 
and thirty children) was beginning to 
make threats against the "forward in 
spirit" ; then 1 tried to grow serious. A 
life very dear to me might be at stake. 
He went away, to come later, he said. 

One night, when my fiance and I were 
coming from a concert, I heard steps be- 
hind us in the dark — the shade of the 



trees was heavy where we were. I start- 
ed to run, pulling my companion along 
with me. I did not dare to speak. A 
voice fell on my ear: 

"Don't be afraid, Mary ! I think it's 
safer if I walk behind you." 

It was the voice of the old policeman 
whom I had known for years. 

"I usually watch you two home at 
night," he said, coming up to us. 

Then I knew there was danger for us. 
The policeman was a good Mormon, but 
he was a friend of mine and had no 
doubt made up his mind to frustrate any. 
plan which would bring me unhappiness. 
But we were watched by the church — 
that was cause for anxiety. 

It was just before this that my sister 
became the second wife of a rich Mor- 
mon. She was so pretty, so full of her 
religious faith, she never could under- 
stand my feelings, and I could not influ- 
ence her. She married, full of "trust in 
the order of heaven" and of confidence in 
her husband. And, I think, too, that she 
expected to be the last wife. Most of 
the young girls could not imagine having 
a successor in their husband's affections. 
She stayed on at home until her husband 
could build a house for her, and he was 
at our house a great deal of the time. 
Six months after he married her he met 
me alone one day and proposed marriage 
to me! Had I been brought up in the 
strictest monogamic home I could not 
have been more shocked. Tears covered 
the red of my shame-burning cheeks. I 
rushed out of the room and out of the 
house and vowed I would never go back. 
But I did go back. I remembered that 
my mother was there, and I did not for- 
get that any open rebellion on my part 
would mean danger to the man I loved. 
My brother-in-law had the grace not to 
speak again to me of marriage. My sis- 
ter never knew. 

A few weeks after we went to a Gen- 
tile minister and were married just be- 
fore the train left for the East. It was 
hard to say good-bye to the Land of 
Promise, because my mother and sister 
were there, bound fast to its soil. But 
the world was before me, and I was only 
twenty. — From The Independent. 



I nless we denv ourselves we denv 
Christ. 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



185 



THE COLORED AMERICANS. 

In commuting the death sentences of 
10 to 16 colored soldiers convicted of the 
courts-martial growing out of the Hous- 
ton, Tex., riots some time over a year 
ago, President Wilson says : 

"I desire the clemency here ordered to 
be a recognition of the splendid loyalty 
of the race to which these soldiers belong 
and an inspiration to the people of that 
race to further zeal and service to |he 
country of which they are citizens, and 
for the liberties of which so many of* 
them are now bravely bearing arms at the 
very front of great fields of battle." 

It is believed that the action of the 
President, especially with his reason 
given for his clemency, will meet with the 
approval of the American people. 

The colored Americans, as a race have 
proved their loyalty as soldiers, as work- 
ers, and as citizens generally. There are 
no exact figures of the amount of Liberty 
Loan bonds and War Savings Stamps 
they have purchased, but enough is 
known to warrant the statement that ac- 
cording to their means and ability their 
financial support of the Government has 
been splendid. The Treasury Depart- 
ment has on more than one occasion re- 
ferred to this fact. The President's ac- 
tion above mentioned, it is believed and 
hoped, will bring a hearty response from 
the colored Americans in the Fourth 
Loan. 



Many a preacher is dying by "de- 
grees." 



In "The United Presbyterian" of No- 
vember 15th, 191 7, is a note of applause 
with reference to a Masonic Grand 
Lodge resolution on the matter of tem- 
perance. 

Paul burned with grief and indigna- 
tion. (Gal. 1 :6-io) because the Gala- 
tian church proved to be such easy game 
for the false teachers. He surely would 
have something to say about this note 
in a professedly anti-secret organ which 
carefully refrains from any editorial 
comment on the real reason for this 
late action on temperance by a pagan 
organization. 

The lodges, including the Masonic 
Lodge, have been hostile, persistently 
and notoriously hostile, to the Cause of 



total abstinence and prohibition. But 
now, forced by the pressure of true reli- 
gion and good business and the war, a 
lodge changes its attitude towards the 
temperance cause, and a church paper, 
"The United Presbyterian," shouts ap- 
plause ! 

Such a spectacle affords amusement 
for Satan and his bunch but they also 
must feel a supreme contempt for the 
church over which he can put things so 
easily. 

The United Presbyterian church was 
once heroic but has apparently lost its 
courageous note. No wonder that more 
or less of its ministers have become 
Modern Prophets of Baal and no won- 
der that the church has fallen from its 
high position under the leadership of 
such a time serving organ.— Christian. 



ODD-FELLOW VERSION. 

So far as we are aware none of the 
books containing Lincoln's Gettysburg 
address follow in every detail the Asso- 
ciated Press report. Neither do they 
agree throughout with each other. Some 
omit the word "poor" from the phrase 
"above our poor power," and some the 
conjunction from "by the people and for 
the people." Both are found, however, 
in the address as written by Mr. Lincoln 
himself for a soldiers' and sailors' fair 
held in Baltimore in the year following 
the cemetery dedication. This must have 
been a literal copy of the manuscript 
which he is known to have held in his 
hand while he spoke, or else a form ac- 
ceptable to the author himself a few 
months afterward. It seems therefore 
the one that ought to be followed, even 
though it is not the only good one. 

Two variations we do not know where 
to find except in The Odd-Fellow Review 
where it was printed in January. The 
other instances, while, as also in some 
others, "and" is omitted ; but special 
variation, so far as we know, is intro- 
duced by substituting "or" for "nor" in 
"will little nor long remember," and by 
inserting "the" before "government" in 
"government of the people." We have 
good reason to think these variations ori- 
ginal, although it remains possible that 
The Review rendering follows copy 
found in some secret society ritual. If 
such changes are due to careless proof- 
reading thev are hardlv excusable. 



186 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October. 1918 



"SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT" 
or 

The Relation of the Christian Church to 
Secret Societies. 

This booklet is for professing church 
leaders and unconverted preachers, says 
the author. He gives ioo reasons by dif- 
ferent men, mostly prominent and well- 
known men, why one should not belong; 
to secret societies. Thirty pages, 4^ by 
7 inches. No price is given, but it prob- 
ably sells for 10 cents. It is well worth 
the money. 

Address G. W. Smith, Greentown, Ind. 



THE SERVICE OF AND SACRIFICE 
FOR SIN. 

(Sermon by Dr. Chas. Inglis of London, 
preached in Johnson City, N. Y.) 

Rom. 6 :20 — Servants of sin. 

Heb. 10:12 — Sacrifice for sin. 

When the Spirit describes sin He 
sometimes calls it a burden you can't re- 
move ; sometimes a debt you can't pay ; 
sometimes a stain you can't erase ; some- 
times a disease you can't cure; some- 
times a task-master you can't conquer. 

Two thoughts are suggested by my 
two texts — the service of sin and the 
sacrifice for sin. 

Servants of Sin. 

All who serve sin will find out three 
things about it. First, the hardening 
effect of sin. Nothing so hardens the 
heart and sears the conscience as sin. 
That suggests to the unsaved man the 
solution of a problem in his life. He 
remembers the first time he committed 
a certain sin — the sleepless nights and 
the gnawing convictions. But he went 
on. The anxiety ceased and he has 
never felt it since. Why? Because the 
heart was hardened to it. 

I was in a country town in England 
where a man was on trial for murder. 
When the jury came in I saw the verdict 
written on their countenances. They 
pronounced the man guilty. The judge 
put on his black cap and with choked 
voice, and eyes dimmed with tears, sen- 
tenced him to execution. A laugh sud- 
denly re-echoed through the hall. I 
looked to learn from whence it came. It 
was from the condemned man.. He was 
completely hardened. My God ! That's 
what sin can do. It steals the conscience 
away from God. 

You will also find out the awful bon- 



dage of sin. A friend said to me once 
when I landed in this country, "Welcome 
to the land of the free." You've got 
millions of white slaves this hour. 
Whatever the sin that dominates you 
and keeps you from Christ, you are in 
bondage to it. Christ came to snap 
every fetter and burst every bond. May 
he do it for you as you hear this mes- 
sage. 

L stood in the metropolis of Glasgow. 
I looked off upon the huge buildings at 
•the east. I was told that it was the 
work house. Another massive one was 
a prison. To the north I beheld a gi- 
gantic insane asylum. Another great 
building was a hospital. In another di- 
rection I saw acres and acres of a grave 
yard. All are the result of sin — poverty, 
crime, lunacy, disease, death. God help 
you to have ever increasing hatred 
toward what the Book calls sin. 
Sacrifice for Sin. 

Thank God, there is a sufficient sacri- 
fice in the atonement of our Lord Jesus 
Christ to meet this world's awful need. 
When Jesus gave the words of John 
3:16, He knew what London, New 
York, San Francisco, Chicago and every 
other city and hamlet needed. 

I spent a whole day in America's larg- 
est prison. I went down into the death 
chamber to meet sixteen men awaiting 
electrocution. I began speaking to one 
man six feet three inches tall. I showed 
him verse after verse. Tears ran down 
his face. The warden came to me and 
said, "Only five minutes more." Putting 
my hands through the bars I gripped his 
hand and asked, "How is it with you?" 

With broken voice, he replied, "My 
sins are blotted out. I won't meet you 
again here but we shall meet on the res- 
urrection morning." 

Three weeks later I learned that as he 
went to the death chair, he sang. 

— Echoes. 



MASONIC RITES. 



As a Masonic word "rite" we learn 
from the "Encyclopedia of Freemason- 
ry" by Mackey, signifies a method of 
conferring Masonic light by a collec- 
tion and a distribution of degrees. The 
original system of Speculative Masonry 
consisted of only the three symbolic 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN' CYNOSIKK 



187 



degrees, called therefore Ancient Craft 
Masonry. 

On the continent of Europe, during 
the first century of Masonry by the in- 
vention of what are known as the high 
degrees, a multitude of rites was estab- 
lished. All of these agreed in one im- 
portant essential, they were built upon 
the three symbolic degrees, which in ev- 
ery instance constituted the fundamen- 
tal basis upon which they were erected. 
They were intended as an expansion and 
development of the Masonic -ideas con- 
tained in the Apprentice, Fellow Craft, 
and Master's degrees, which were the 
text and the high degrees the commen- 
tary. 

Mackey says that there has been "a 
multitude of these Rites which furnish 
diverse methods of attaining the same 
great 'end: the acquisition of divine truth 
by Masonic light." He gives the fol- 
lowing as the most important of those 
which have hitherto or still continued 
to arrest the attention of the Masonic 
students: i. York Rite, 2. Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite, 3. French 
or Modern Rite, 4. American Rite, 5. 
Philosophic Scottish Rite, 6. Primitive 
Scottish Rite, f Reformed Rite, 8. Re- 
formed Helvetic Rite, 9. Fessler's Rite, 
10. Schroder's Rite, 11. Rite of the 
Grand Lodge of the Three Globes, 12. 
Rite of the Elect of Truth, 13. Rite of 
the Vielle Bru, 14. Rite of the Chap- 
ter of Clermont, 15. Pernetty's Rite, 16. 
Rite of the Blazing Star, if. Chastan- 
ier's Rite, 18. Rite of the Philalethes, 
19. Primitive Rite of the Philadel- 
phians, 20. Rite of Martinism, 21. Rite 
of Brother Henoch, 22. Rite of Miz- 
raim, 23. Rite of Memphis, 24. Rite 
of Strict Observance, 25. Rite of Lax 
Observance, 26. Rite of African Archi- 
tects, 27. Rite of Brothers of Asia, 28. 
Rite of Perfection, 29. Rite of Elected 
Cohens, 30. Rite of the Emperors of 
the East and West, 31. Primitive Rite 
of Narbonne, 32. Rite of the Order of 
the Temple, 33. Swedish Rite, 34. Rite 
of Swedenborg, 35. Rite of Zinnendorf , 
36. Egyptian Rite of Cagliostro, 37. 
Rite of the Beneficient Knights of the 
Holy City. 

On the opposite page is found an il- 
lustration of the above remarks. It will 
be seen that the American Rite has ten 



high degrees which include the Royal 
Arch and Knight Templar imposed upon 
the Blue Lodge, or first three degrees; 
and that the Scotch Rite consists of. thir- 
ty high degrees, imposed on the Blue 
Lodge. 



J|eto£ of 0ut W&ovk 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

This month is given to work in the 
Southland where the sun is bright and 
the stars shine through the night. My 
effort is being put forth with such wis- 
dom and strength as God supplies. My 
hope is in Him. There are a thousand 
evidences that the war is on. Such 
preparation surely was never before 
known to men. All is on the move. The 
aeroplanes are not quite as numerous as 
the birds, but often go in flocks. 

My first stop was at Norfolk, Virginia. 
There I gave a lecture to a goodly com- 
pany who gathered in what is known as 
the "Church of God." A brother Bar- 
rett, who is in charge of the work, re- 
ceived me kindly and provided a bed, 
after the dismissal of the people in the 
church. Sleeping in the pulpit was a 
new experience. The city is greatly 
crowded, good accommodations being at 
a premium. Several expressed apprecia- 
tion of my effort and said, "Come again." 

In the colonies of our Mennonite 
friends at Fentress and Denbigh, Vir- 
ginia, I found the expected welcome and 
hearing. x\ddresses were given and 
Cynosure subscriptions obtained at 
these places as also at Oyster Point. A 
friend kindly took a company of Chris- 
tian workers to Hilton, a new town 
building near Newport News, Virginia, 
on Sabbath afternoon. A good audience 
of the mechanics and soldiers were 
gathered in the "Recreation Hall'' and 
your representative gave the message. 
Tears were noted in the eyes of some of 
the audience. Thousands of men are 
there gathered to do the work needed. 
Many are far from home, literally and 
spiritually ; minds would naturally revert 
to the home gatherings and the loved 
ones far distant. These are war times 
and hearts must be brave. The crops 
are generally looking well in this section. 



188 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October 1918 



At Fentress I found the cotton fields 
promising well. The late corn and pota- 
toes were expected to exceed the earlier 
crop. The number to feed is so increased 
it is difficult to meet the needs. Prices 
are generally higher than was ever 
known, and the government pay has been 
raised accordingly. 

I am now at Richmond, the capital city 
of the old historic Virginia Common- 
wealth. I find much of historic interest 
but naturally little interest in the N. C. 
A., as our work is not generally known 
here and lodge members are thicker than 
huckleberries. I found a colored pastor 
who was willing to subscribe for the 
Cynosure. Said he had taken thirty- 
three degrees in Masonry, and belonged 
to a long list of other lodges but when 
he was sanctified he left them all. I hope 
he will send his experience to the Cyno- 
sure. Some Lutheran and Friends church 
people were interested but felt they were 
too much engaged otherwise to give help 
to the anti-lodge work now.- I visited 
the old St. John's Episcopal church and 
stood on the spot where Patrick Henry 
made his historic oration in which he ex- 
claimed "Give me liberty or give me 
death." Judging from the lodge em- 
blems and conditions generally, there are 
many attendants of that church who 
have but little spiritual liberty. The 
"caretaker" of the church seemed to be 
much impressed with his personal great- 
ness. He seemed to delight most in tell- 
ing how he could make great speeches. 
His picture had been taken, he said, and 
could be seen in the "movies." He was 
making a speech, he declared, when his 
picture was taken. 

After reporting last month I held sev- 
eral meetings in the Pennsylvania Cum- 
berland valley. My venture from Mer- 
cersburg in the country turned out well. 
T found the elder and friends of the 
"Clay-lick" Church of the Brethren 
willing to hear my messages. They had 
me teach the entire Sabbath school, 
preach and lecture. They in turn re- 
sponded in aiding our work. That's a 
beautiful country with its fertile fields 
nestling between the towering moun- 
tains. The days spent there were days 
of pleasure to the writer. 

Running to Fayetteville, Pennsylvania, 
I was -conveyed by our faithful Brother 



Yaukey to the Rhodes camp grounds in 
time to attend the closing sessions of this 
year's gathering. I found the truth 
presented in the power of the Spirit had 
been having its effect in many conver- 
sions. The coming of the brethren and 
sisters from a distance that they might 
help in these meetings had proven to be 
a great blessing. These friends stand 
solidly on our side in the anti-lodge 
effort. 

A good opportunity was given for a 
message by the Brethren in Christ who 
met for a prayer meeting near New 
Kingston, Pennsylvania. Their response 
in a^d of our work was kindly. A Sab- 
bath spent at Hagerstown and Chews- 
ville, Maryland, was helpful. The morn- 
ing service was with our friends of the 
Radical Brethren Church and the even- 
ing with those of the Church of the 
Brethren. A meeting which was largely 
attended was held in the Pairmount 
Church of the Brethren nearby, on Tues- 
day evening. The work of our Radical 
United Brethren in Hagerstown is com- 
paratively new, but they feel encouraged 
in what has been accomplished and in 
their prospects. The "plain churches" 
are found all through that section. Many 
will welcome our work. 

It will be seen by this report that with 
Divine help I am still enabled to push 
ahead. Your Eastern representative is 
not able to accomplish what he would 
like, but believes many are being helped 
by a persistent sowing of the Gospel 
(good news) seed, and that there are 
great harvests in store. My plan is to 
continue work in Virginia for some days 
before returning as usual to my home in 
Washington. God willing, my efforts 
next month will be given to New York 
and work further East. May God great- 
ly bless the work and the helpers and 
bring us all to rejoice with Him when 
the right shall be victorious. 



BENJAMIN M. HOLT. 

The author of the treatise, "The 
Woodmen of the World," Mr. B. M. 
Holt, of Clifton, Texas, whose booklet 
has been advertised in the Cynosure, 
has been passing through a time of 
special trial on account of the sickness 
of himself and wife. We bespeak for 
them the prayers and sympathy of our 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURK 



189 



readers. In a letter recently received, 
he writes, "Some day we shall know 
why He led us so! 1 Now we do not un- 
derstand it but one thing we know : 

'What our Father does is well, 
Though He sadden hill and dell ! 
Upward let our voices rise 
For the strength His Word supplies ; 
He has called us ; sons of God, 
Can we murmur at His rod ?' ' : 

Every copy of the Cynosure which 
Brother Holt receives, after reading, is 
sent on to some one either in this or 
foreign countries. 

Rev. E. A. Boyd of Manitowoc, Wis- 
consin, recently wrote Mr. Holt : "Your 
name has a good ring among the Luth- 
eran pastors for the work you have done 
for the church in your unflinching anti- 
lodge testimony. From more than one 
unexpected source I have found it to be 
highly appreciated." 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Dear Cynosure: 

When I returned to Omaha on the 
20th of August I found some brethren 
from the state of Oregon conducting 
tent meetings which lasted for thirty 
days. The white people joined in with 
us and together we glorified the name of 
Jesus in song, prayer and testimony. 

During these meetings your humble 
servant had the opportunity of telling 
the people of the sin of secret orders, as 
well as of all other sin, but my exposure 
of the secret orders and their pagan wor- 
ship seemed to the people to be the limit. 
I was permitted, however, to speak again 
the day after I received a , package of 
rituals and tracts from the N. C. A. and 
my subject for the evening was "The 
Separation of God's Church from the 
World" (Ps. 1:1-6). I said, "Friends, 
the people that walk in the counsel of the 
ungodly are not blest, nor is the Chris- 
tian who stands in the sinner's way ; 
neither are those blest who sit in the seat 
of the scornful." 

I then read Jer. 15:15-16; n Cor. 
6:14-18; Rev. 18:4, and 1 Sam. 5:1-4, 
These references carried this message to 
the people that idol worship can not be 
mixed with the true worship of God 



(Lev. 10:10). They also show that God 
said we must make a difference between 
the holy and the unholy, the clean and 
the unclean. 1 also emphasized the 
fifteenth verse of the thirtieth chapter 
of Deuteronomy, "See I have set before 
thee this day life and good, death and 
evil," as well as the 19th verse of the 
same chapter, "I call heaven and earth 
to record this day against you, that I 
have set before you life and death, bless- 
ing and cursing; therefore choose life. 
that both thou and thy seed may live." I 
then told them that God has called each 
one of us to holiness (1 Thes. 4-7), and 
His Word cannot be changed (Ps. 
119:89), for He has said, "Come out" 
(Rev. 18:4). The church of today has 
fellowship with every kind of sinful 
secret work until it has become the hab- 
itation "of devils and the hold of every 
foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean 
and hatefifl bird." 

Among those listening were church 
people who were members of the Wood- 
men of the World, the Elks, the Big Dog 
Lodge, Oddfellows, Ruths, Masons, 
Eastern Star, Knights of Columbus, 
Knights of Pythias, Red Men, Owls and 
Order of the Serpent. Think of all this 
religious junk sitting up in a church and 
calling it God's church ! I then brought 
out some rituals and said, "Now I know 
what I am saying is true, and God will 
not have all this evil in His church. 
Some of you, T know, will become very 
angry while others will be made glad, 
but I am only setting forth good and 
evil, life and death, and the choice is 
for you to make." Then I added, "Wood- 
men have a Grand Woodchopper above 
to meet them ; the Masons a Grand Mas- 
ter ; the Oddfellows a Grand Xoble 
Father ; but when you die you'll still be- 
long to the devil and his kingdom. A 
Catholic says he will go to purgatory, 
but we know that in the Bible only two 
places are mentioned — Heaven if you 
obey God, and Hell if you don't. In 
Mark 16:16, Jesus says, 'He that be- 
lieveth and is baptized shall be saved ; 
but he that believeth not shall be 
damned.' This means we are to believe 
all of the Gospel, not just a part of it. 
W r e are told not to add nor take from 
His word, and when men add Jubela, 
Jubelo, and Jubelum they are breaking 



190 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



October, 1918 



His commandments." 

I also had tracts, distributed at this 
meeting and my daughter and a young 
preacher sold "Freemasonry at a Glance" 
and copies of the Cynosure. Both car- 
ried rituals which were circulated in the 
congregation so that the men and women 
could look at them. One Mason, a very 
old man, bought two "Freemasonry at a 
Glance," and was astonished beyond 
measure to find it contained the Masonic 
secrets. He told his daughter-in-law, 
"Why, if that woman was in the state of 
Louisiana they would kill her at once." 
I asked her in what part of Louisiana he 
lived and she said at Delhi. "Well," said 
I, "when I was in Monroe, Louisiana, 
five years ago, I was only twenty miles 
from Delhi and no one killed me." When 
she told him, he did not know what to 
say. One white woman got awfully mad 
over what I said regarding the Wood- 
men of the World, for she safd her hus- 
band was a Woodman and a good man 
too. When I heard it I said, "He may 
be a good man but the Grand Wood- 
chopper has no heaven to put him in. 
God said 'Heaven is my throne and the 
earth is my footstool, and hell is pre- 
pared for the devil and his angels,' so 
the Woodmen will have to go to one or 
the other of these p 1 aces." One preacher 
had a street carnival but that did not 
keep the people away from the tent. 
Some of the town's people said, "That 
tent must come down," but the Mayor of 
Omaha gave us the right to hold meet- 
ings and so no one could interfere. Both 
white and colored people became con- 
victed of sin at these meetings. 

One night someone called a police- 
man and told him that we held our meet- 
ings too late into the night and kept them 
up. I told the officer that all who did 
not wish to hear the Gospel should stay 
at home and sleep, then those who did 
want to hear would have more room to 
sit down. There were between three 
and four hundred on the grounds every 
night and after our regular service we 
would have an altar service and then 
we told them all who wished to stay for 
prayer could and those who preferred 
to leave were at liberty to do so, but 
they would all stay. One night a white 
man fell down on his knees and cried to 
God to save him. He said he believed 



his sins were unpardonable. We prayed 
with him and all the people stayed to see 
what would happen. When he got up he 
said, "I believe the Lord has forgiven 
me." He wa's very happy and praised 
God for accepting a sinner like him. It 
was during this meeting that the officer 
was called, but all he did was to tell 
those who were tired and sleepy to go 
home. Every night after that we sent 
home all those who did not care to stay 
so they would not have to call an officer 
and say we kept them up. The congre- 
gation was not disturbed until men and 
women, both white and colored, said 
"The Word of God is right," and were 
converted from their old way of living. 
Another evening when a white man 
fainted a doctor was called and it was 
found that this man had heart trouble. 
The following day an item in the news- 
paper said, "While the dusky Billy Sun- 
day was telling the people of their sin, a 
white man fell down and it was found 
necessary to call a doctor." The paper 
also said that we claimed that the trouble 
was he had sin in his heart, and that was 
just what we said. However, this man 
was taken home deeply convicted of sin 
and the next night came back praising 
God. The people came in such crowds 
every night that finally we were obliged 
to take the tent down and hold the meet- 
ings in the open. The Gospel shut 
everybody's mouth and no one com- 
plained because meetings were held in 
the open. 

Yours for the Lord's work, 

Lizzie Roberson/ 



A REAL ESTATE VENTURE. 

Where will you find a finer example of 
a confident outlook in the midst of dark 
days than in the case of the old prophet 
Jeremiah ? Gloomy as the immediate 
prospect was, he persisted in regarding 
it as a mere incident in the onward 
march of events toward the better days 
to come. And nothing in his whole 
career is more significant of this than 
that land venture of his, when Jerusalem 
was already under siege. Had you for- 
gotten about it? Look it up in the 
thirty-second chapter. 

A certain Hanamel, the prophet's 
cousin, wisely ( ?) noting the trend of 
things, decided it was a splendid time to 



October, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUkK 



191 



sell out, provided, of course, he could 
find a buyer. His holdings consisted of 
a lot in Anathoth, a village a short dis- 
tance out from Jerusalem, and also the 
home town of Jeremiah. To Jeremiah 
he went with his proposition. The 
prophet should have the first chance, as 
was his right, being a kinsman of Han- 
amel. 

One can easily imagine that Cousin 
Hanamel thought it might not be so easy 
to make the deal, under the circum- 
stances. But Jeremiah's confidence in 
the value of Judean real estate was not 
so easily shaken. Immediately he "knew 
that this was the word of Jehovah/' It 
was an opportunity to show his faith by 
his works, to bring his message home to 
his countrymen in a most effective man- 
ner. And so, with the Babylonian army 
hammering at the gates of Jerusalem, 
and himself predicting the capture of the 
city, Jeremiah bought the land, paying 
cash in full, and turned the deed over to 
his friend Baruch, to take care of "many 
days," until the time should come when 
"houses and fields and vineyards shall 
yet again he bought in- this land." 

That's the true optimism for you. The 

world is in agony today, and there may 

be still deeper distress before the better 

days come again. But they are coming. 
* * * * 

Do you believe in the future of Chris- 
tianity? Enough to show your faith in 
the same practical way that Jeremiah 
showed his faith in the future of Judea ? 
Put your money into it. And do it now, 
while the enemy is at the gates, and 
faint-hearted brethren are throwing up 
their hands in despair. Buy a "field" in 
"Anathoth" and buy it now. — The 
Gospel Messenger. 



Can you not send an offering to the 
National Christian Association every 
month? Purchase one of its Annuity 
Bonds if you need the income. Do, and 
keep doing is Jeremiah optimism ! He 
that endureth to the end receiveth the 
crown. Have you read in this number 
President Blanchard's article? It is a 
good tonic. 



The Cynosure Extention Fund is 
overdrawn. Help extend our magazine's 
work. Rev. Oscar A. Benson calls the 
Cynosure "the most effective weapon." 



We are holding matter for several 
tracts which your money would help in 
printing and distributing. "The Three- 
fold , Indictment, 1 ' by Rev. Adam Murr- 
man, ought to be reprinted. There is a 
demand for it. Booklets and tracts must 
be given away as a rule. Such seed has 
brought abundant fruit in many cases. 

Do not forget that the Association has 
current expenses, and the secretary, 
treasurer, editor and clerk also have 
needs. Our thanks are due to all of you 
who have helped and are now helping to 
save the churches and nation. 



FRIENDS RALLYING AROUND THE 
CYNOSURE. 
Mr. Martin A. Anderson, proprietor 
of the "Anderson Grove Farm," Atwater, 
Minnesota, writes : "I am now sending 
you $3, for which please send me the 
Christian Cynosure for three years." 



Rev. Oscar A. Benson, of Albert City, 
Iowa, in sending us the names of three 
new subscribers, writes: "Believing, as I 
do, that your magazine places the most 
effective weapons in the hands of anti- 
lodge workers, I want you to send the 
Cynosure for one year to the parties 
whose names I enclose." 



J. D. Rockwell of Alhambra, Illinois, 
writes: "In response to your article in 
the September Cynosure, asking each of 
us to send a year's subscription to some 
friend, I herewith enclose one dollar. 
You may send the Cynosure for one 
vear to . 



Mr. George C. Rich, Areola, Illinois, 
as he leaves for soldier duty sends a dol- 
lar for the Cynosure to . 



A Methodist pastor in the state of 
New York, sends two dollars, thus be- 
coming a sustaining member of the Asso- 
ciation and sends additional funds for 
the Cynosure to be sent for a few 
months to a brother minister. 

A Pennsylvania friend sends five dol- 
lars and the names of five persons to 
whom the Cynosure is to be sent for a 
year. 

We thank these friends and have no 
doubt others will follow their example 
during October. We hope there will be 
manv such. 



Knights of Columbus 

ILLUSTRATED 

A COMPLETE RITUAL AND HISTORY OF THE FIRST 
THREE DEGREES, INCLUDING ALL SECRET 
"WORK", FULLY ILLUSTRATED BY A FORMER 
MEMBER OF THE ORDER. 

This work gives the proper position of each officer during the 
meetings, the proper manner of conducting the business of 
the Knights of Columbus, order of opening and closing 
of the Lodge, dress of candidates, ceremony of initiation; giving 
the signs, grips, pass words, etc. Convenient pocket size. 

Paper Covers - - - $ .75 
Cloth - 1.00 

National Christian Association 

850 W. Madison Street CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Notice to Reader*!— When you finis., reading this magazine place a 1-cent stamp on this notice, hand - 
^o.S employee and It will be placed In the hand* of our soldiers or sailors at the front. No wrapping. No 
tress. A. S. BURLESON, Postmaster General. 




VOL. LI. 




CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, 1918. 




Geo. C. Needham 

11 The Irish Evangelist" 

Peter did not heed the teaching of 
Psalm 1, he sat with them. Even relig- 
ious professors whose religion ignores 
the Divine Christ we must avoid. I do 
not hesitate to add that many true be- 
lievers and professed ministers have lost 
their spiritual power through evil com- 
panionship with the world. How many 
a Samson has laid his head on the lap 
of this unscrupulous Delilah, and defiled 
his Nazariteship. If Christians, against 
the teaching of God's Word, ally them- 
selves with the ungodly, and help to 
build up a false religion, can we wonder 
at their complaint, "my leanness, my 
1 



eanness 



GEO. C. NEEDHAM. 



Number 7 



OFFICIAL ORGAN, NATIONAL CHRISTIAN AJTOCIATION 
10 CENTS A COPY ESTABLISHED 1868 1.00 A YEAR 



Vol. LI, No, 7 



CHICAGO 



NOVEMBER 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if w.e are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
nt the Poit Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
Ylar.a 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



The Latest Society — Philadelphia Public 

Ledger . . 221 

Eastern Secretary's Report, by Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 221 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 223 

Kind Words from Friends 228 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. John F. Heemstra : 
Vice-President, Rev. J. H. B. Williams 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. F. H. Peter- 
son ; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phil- 
lips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



M. P. F. Doermann, Thomas C. Mc- 

Geo. C. Needham, "The Irish Evangelist" Knight, D. S. Warner, C. A. Blanchard, 

Cover P. A. Kittilsby, H. A. Fischer, Jr., 

Ami- v f r^ r. -a ± in* George Slager, A. H. Leaman, George 

Affiliations of Our Presidents 19o ■ _ , & T ' - , TT *> 

VV. Bond, J. H. Hoekstra and H. J. 

Does Sincerity Save? — By Pres. C. A. Kuiper 

Blanchard 197 

Knight of Malta and Knight of Malta... 200 

Funeral of Cardinal Farley— United LECTURERS. 

Presbyterian 202 Those desiring lectures or addresses 

Wise Sayings— The Lutheran Herald.... 202 may write to any of the speakers named 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 208 below : 

"Climbing Above the Clouds in Christian Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 3118 Fourteenth 

Experience," poem 208 St -> N - W -> Washington, D. C. 

A Word in Season, by Prof. J. R. Millin. 208 Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 

t u \xr a. u- xj- ti 1 •* Ave., Richmond, Ind. 
Laborer Worthy His Hire — The Literary 

Digest 209 Rev. F. J. Davidson, 25 12 14th St., 

T , n , m , r „ , ~ , New Orleans, La. 
The Quaker Odd-bellow, by a Quaker 

Pastor 210 Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96. 

John Quincy Adams, by Judge W. F. ' 

Brannan 217 Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 





There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

— Acts 4:12 


CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 


Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have 1 
said nothing. 
— John 18:20 





AFFILIATIONS OF OUR PRESI- 
DENTS. 

George Washington, the first Presi- 
dent of the United States, was an Epis- 
copalian. It is, however, stated that he 
was no more than an adherent and sym- 
pathizer. Washington was technically a 
Mason, but such an indifferent one as to 
be fairly classed among the non-affiliated. 
(See "Was Washington a Freemason?'' 
by Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., National 
Christian Assn., Chicago.) 



John Adams, the second President, 
was a Unitarian. He was not a Mason 
and repeatedly told his son that his 
reason for not joining the lodge was 
"there is nothing in the Masonic institu- 
tion worthy of seeking to be associated 
with it." 



Thomas Jefferson, the third President, 
was probably an infidel. He is called 
a "Free-thinker," while some class him 
as an atheist, but this his family denied 
after his death. He was not a Mason. 



James Madison, the fourth President, 
was a member of the Episcopal church. 
He was not a Mason and has left this 
testimony: "From the number and 
character of those who now support the 
charges against Masonry, I cannot doubt 
that it is at least susceptible to abuse, 
outweighing any advantages promised by 
its patrons." 



James Monroe,, the fifth President, 
was a member of the Episcopal church. 
He also was not a Mason. 



John Quincy Adams, the sixth Presi- 
dent, was a Unitarian, member of the 
same church with his father. In his 
letter to Edward Livingston, Secretary 
of State under Jackson's administration, 
and Grand High Priest of the General 



Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the 
United States, he wrote, "I am prepared 
to complete the demonstration before 
God and man, that the Masonic oaths, 
obligations and penalties cannot by any 
possibility be reconciled to the laws of 
morality, of Christianity, or of the land." 



Andrew Jackson, the seventh Presi- 
dent, towards the close of his life at- 
tended the Presbyterian church, and 
after Mrs. Jackson's death he became a 
member. He was a Mason. 



Martin Van Buren, the eighth Presi- 
dent, was not a member of any church 
but regularly attended the Dutch Re- 
formed church near his home in Kinder- 
hook, New York. He is usually classed 
among the non-Masons. In the list of 
Presidents who were Masons, printed in 
the Iowa Masonic Library Quarterly 
Bulletin, January, 1917, Van Buren is 
excluded. 



William Henry Harrison, the ninth 

President, was a communicant in the 

Episcopal church. He never joined any 
secret societv. 



John Tyler, the tenth President, was 
an Episcopalian, and is said personally 
to have been a very devout man. He 
was not a Mason. 

James K. Polk, the eleventh President, 
was not a church member but generally- 
attended the Presbyterian church of 
which Mrs. Polk was a member. In his 
last illness he was, however, baptized by 
a Methodist minister and received into 
the Methodist church. He was a Mason. 



Zachary Taylor, the twelfth President, 
regularly attended the services of the 
Episcopal church and may have been a 
member. He was not a Mason. 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



Millard Fillmore, the thirteenth Presi- 
dent, was a Unitarian, born and raised in 
a family of that church. His testimony 
was, "The Masonic fraternity tramples 
upon our rights, defeats the administra- 
tion of justice, and bids defiance to every 
government which it cannot control." 



Franklin Pierce, the fourteenth Presi- 
dent, was a Congregationalist but his 
religion was described as more of the 
head than of the heart. He is usually 
classed among the non-Masons and was 
excluded from a list of Masonic Presi- 
dents in the Iowa Masonic Quarterly 
Bulletin of January 1917. 



James Buchanan, the fifteenth Presi- 
dent, was said to be an exemplary mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. He was 
also a Mason. 



Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth Presi- 
dent of the United States, was not a 
church member but is represented as a 
man of deep religious convictions and a 
man of prayer. He usually attended 
services in the Presbyterian church. He 
was not a Mason. William E. Curtis 
states the following in the Chicago Rec- 
cord of March 17, 1899: 

"Several pictures of Lincoln in Ma- 
sonic regalia have been published, with 
statements of men who claim to have 
been members of the same lodge. Sec- 
retary Hay [Lincoln's private secretary] 
says that Mr. Lincoln told him that he 
had never been a Mason." 



Andrew Johnson, the seventeenth 
President, generally attended the Metho- 
dist church but was not a member. He 
was a Mason. 



Ulysses S. Grant, the eighteenth Presi- 
dent, was not a member of any church 
but generally attended services in the 
Methodist church, of which he is said to 
have become a member shortly before 
his death. He was not a Mason and in 
his "Memoirs" said "all secret, oath- 
bound political parties are dangerous to 
any nation, no matter how pure or how- 
patriotic the motives and principles 
which first bring them together." 

Rutherford B. Hayes, the nineteenth 



President, was for many years a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. He was 
not a Mason. 



James A. Garfield, the twentieth 
President, held his membership with the 
Disciples of Christ and early in his life 
frequently officiated in their pulpits. He 
was a Mason. 



Chester A. Arthur, the twenty-first 
President, was prominently connected 
with one of the leading Episcopal 
churches of New York City. He is 
numbered among the non-Masons. 



Grover Cleveland, the twenty-second 
President, was a regular attendant and 
in his later years a member of the Pres- 
byterian church. He was not a Mason 
and the efforts put forward to capture 
him for the lodge were not as successful 
as they were with Roosevelt and Taft. 
As late as in 1904 the public press gave 
the date and the name of the lodge in 
which ex-President Cleveland was to be 
initiated. Under date of Princeton, New 
Jersey, March 28th, 1904, ex-President 
Cleveland wrote to Secretary W. I. 
Phillips, "I suppose before this time you 
have seen in the public prints my denial 
of the published statement that I was to 
join a Masonic lodge." 



Benjamin Harrison, the twenty-third 
President, was a Presbyterian and an 
elder of that church for many years. He 
was not a Mason. 



William McKinley, the twenty-fourth 
President of the United States, was a 
devout Methodist and a Mason. 



Theodore Roosevelt, the twenty-fifth 
President of the United States, is a 
member of the Dutch Reformed church 
but is himself liberal in sentiment. The 
Church of which he is a member is un- 
derstood to be opposed to secret socie- 
ties. There is no question but that such 
was its attitude in the West and still is 
the position of a large portion of its 
membership. Mr. Roosevelt joined the 
Masons after he became Vice-President, 
and, he is reported, since he became 
prominent in national politics, to have 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURh" 



197 



become a member of most of tbe orders 
of any note. 

William H. Taft, the twenty-sixth 
President, is a Unitarian but has man- 
ifested no exclusive spirit. Mr. Taft 
was made a Mason "at sight" after be- 
coming President. During the presi- 
dential campaign in which he was elected 
he wrote from Cincinnati, Ohio, under 
date of July 26th, "So far as I know 
should I be elected there is nothing to 
hinder a just and equable administration 
of the office of President on my part. I 
have been advised that the obligations in 
the leading secret societies do not pre- 
vent perfectly pure administration of an 
office by one who is a member of them. 
I have belonged to no secret society, 
however, since I was in college." It is 
to be regretted that Mr. Taft did not 
show the firmness in resisting the pres- 
sure which characterized ex-President 
Cleveland. 



Two others evidently joined for political 
reasons and are believed to care little for 
Masonry itself, having the "mark of the 
beast" in their hands instead of in their 
foreheads. 



Woodrow Wilson, twenty-seventh 
President, is a Presbyterian and is not a 
Mason. 



It is seen that before the end of life 
twenty-two Presidents became members 
of some church. There were six Episco- 
palians ; four Unitarians ; five Presbyte- 
rians ; four Methodist Episcopals ; one 
Congregationalist ; one Disciple of Christ 
and one Dutch Reformed. 

There were five that so far as we 
know never became church members. 
One is called a "Free-thinker" ; one at- 
tended as a rule the Dutch Reformed : 
another the Episcopal ; one other the 
Presbyterian, and another the Methodist 
Episcopal. 

As to their secret society affiliations it 
is seen that two-thirds of the Presidents 
were free from Masonic obligations, 
which one of their number (John Quincy 
Adams) declared to be such: "That no 
President of the United States ought 
ever to be shackled by such obligations 
or be under the self-assumed burden of 
such penalties." ("Letters and Addresses 
on Freemasonry," by John Quincy .hi- 
atus. Page 209). 

Only one-third of the Presidents were 
Masons and among them is Washington, 
who may be classed as non-affiliated. 



DOES SINCERITY SAVE? 
BY PRES. CHARLES A. BLANC HARD. 

One of the common expressions among 
people who are not spiritually enlight- 
ened is, that, if a man is honest in his 
opinions, he will be all right, whether his 
opinions are right or wrong. Dr. Walk- 
er, author of the "Philosophy of the 
Plan of Salvation," "God Revealed in 
Creation and Christ," etc., speaking on 
this subject, said, "It makes all the dif- 
ference in the world whether a man's 
opinions are true or false. The more 
sincere a man is, if he is wrong in his 
belief, the more certain he is to be 
ruined." He illustrates this statement 
quite thoroughly. He says that if a man 
is in business with a partner and he truly 
believes that his partner is an honest 
man, whereas the fact is, he is a thief, 
the more sincere he is in this belief and 
the more fully he lives up to it, the more 
certain he is to be ruined. He speaks of 
a young woman sought in marriage by a 
disreputable and worthless man. If she 
really believes that the man is good, she 
very likely will accept his attentions and 
finally marry him, the result being that 
her life will be ruined. If a man is 
standing on a railway, and a fast train 
is approaching, if he really believes the 
train is on another track, when in fact, 
it is coming right down on him, the more 
sincere he is in his faith the more cer- 
tain he is to be killed. This truth does 
not require further illustration. It is 
obvious to all intelligent men who will 
think, yet there are thousands of persons 
repeating week after week the foolish 
propostion, "It makes no difference what 
a man believes, provided he is sincere." 
The fact is, it makes all the difference in 
the world what a man believes, and if he 
believes error, the more sincere he is in 
his faith, the more certain he is that the 
error is true, the more surely will he be 
destroyed. 

This train of thought has been sug- 
gested by a remarkable letter which our 
secretary has just submitted to me: it 
was sent to him by a Christian worker, 



WTM 



198 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



who apparently is not perfectly at ease in 
his lack of Christian faith. He thinks 
himself a Christian ; he has been baptized 
and confirmed ; he believes the Bible in a 
general way, but does not believe it to be 
literally the Word of God ; he speaks of 
the crudities of the Old Testament and 
in various ways shows that he has no re- 
liance upon the Bible as the true Word 
of God. He says that his prophets are 
such men as R. J. Campbell of England 
and Dr. Foster of Chicago University. 
He, of course, speaks of the narrowness 
of creeds and aspires to be a broad and 
a generous man ; he thinks he is, and in- 
this belief he is entirely sincere, if one is 
able to interpret correctly his state of 
mind from his words. It is natural that 
such a man should be a lodge man ; he is. 
He is a member of the Knight Templars, 
of the thirty-second degree of the An- 
cient and Accepted Scottish Rite ; he is 
a Mystic Shriner ; an Odd-Fellow ; an 
Elk ; an Eagle ; a Red Man. He belongs 
to the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics ; he is a Modern Woodman ; 
he is a member in the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and in the Brother- 
hood of American Yeomen, and because 
this list is not sufficiently large he adds 
"etc." 

Lodges — Puerile and Disgusting. 

He says there is much in the Lodge 
ceremony that is puerile and disgusting 
to the thinking man and that much of its 
symbolism is forced. He thinks, how- 
ever, it does kindle in the minds of men 
the idea of mutuality, which will do for 
a start. He says that most men join 
lodges from selfish motives, but that 
sometimes this selfishness is shamed out 
of them. He says that the oaths and 
obligations of the Orders may seem to 
exclude mankind in general. As a lodge 
man of years' standing he expresses his 
belief that they do at first, but he thinks 
that by and by lodge men broaden in their 
sympathies and become friends of man- 
kind ; he thinks that lodges help in this 
widening of human sympathy. 

It is real refreshing to read a letter 
from such a man, and while his entire 
conception of Christianity seems to be 
at fault as it would be naturally under 
the circumstances, there is reason to hope 
that such a man's heart may be much 
more nearly correct than his head, and 



having arrived at the conclusion that the 
Christian faith is one of the purest and 
best religious faiths in the world, we may 
hope that he will by and by come to be- 
lieve that it is the one faith that can save 
the soul of man. I would like to bring 
into clearer relief a few of the articles in 
his confession of faith for the enlighten- 
ment of those who are not in lodges and 
for the conversion and salvation of those 
who are. Years ago I used to hear the 
Hutchinsons sing a chorus that ran this 
way, "O, the fatherhood of God and the 
brotherhood of man, we will ring it and 
we'll sing it as we wing it through the 
land." This is one of the favorite doc- 
trines of our time, God is the father of 
all, all men are brothers. If by the word 
father men mean creator, there is no ob- 
jection to the statement. God is certain- 
ly the creator of all men just as He is the 
creator of all things, but fatherhood 
among rational beings involves identity 
of nature. When Christ said that God 
was His Father, the Jews wanted to kill 
Him for blasphemy ; they said He made 
Himself equal with God; He did. There 
is no question respecting this matter. 
Now, that God is the father of all men 
in this sense is clearly a fiction, and if 
men believe it thoroughly and act upon 
it, they are in danger of eternal death. 
The Jews who were planning to murder 
Jesus Christ, of whom this friend speaks 
so highly, at that very time said that God 
was their father. Christ said to them, 
God is not your father, "if God were 
your Father ye would love me, for I pro- 
ceeded forth and came from God" and 
not content with this denial, He put the 
negative truth in positive form, and said 
to them plainly, "Ye are of your father 
the devil ;" he was a liar and a murderer, 
and though he did not say it, undoubtedly 
their consciences reminded them that 
they were liars and murderers, too, thus 
proving the truth of the statement which 
he made. 

Is Christianity a Religion or the Religion? 
These friends who deny the teaching 
of Jesus Christ respecting the sinful na- 
tures of men and their parentage as 
Christ stated it are very fond of speaking 
of Christianity as one of the religions of 
the world, sometimes, like this friend, 
they intimate, if they do not declare, that 
it is the best of all the religions, but their 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



199 



teaching is clearly that it is only one of 
a number of good systems of faith and 
practice. 

I had a dear friend many years ago, in 
many ways an admirable man. He was 
very kind to me personally, I owe him a 
large debt for many kindnesses. He 
thought that Protestantism was good for 
Protestants, Catholicism for Catholics, 
Hinduism for Hindus, Buddhism for the 
worshippers of Buddha, and that the de- 
grading superstitions of Africa were best 
for the dwellers in the long grass and the 
deep forests. The lodges being strictly 
pagan are teaching the same doctrine 
here ; this brother apparently believes 
what his lodges have taught- him, and he 
is one of many. On the other hand, 
Christians hold that Jesus Christ is the 
only mediator between God and man, 
that the Bible is the one verbal revela- 
tion which God has given to men for the 
revelation of His character and their duty 
and destiny. In other words, a Christian 
does not believe that God is one God of 
many ; he does not believe that Jesus 
Christ is one Saviour of many ; he does 
not believe that the Christian religion is 
one divine system of many, but he be- 
lieves that there is only one living and 
true God, maker of heaven and earth 
and father of our Lord Jesus Christ, and 
all those who are born of God by faith 
in Him are God's children ; he believes 
that Jesus Christ is the only mediator, 
between God and man, that no man can 
come to the Father except through Jesus 
Christ, that, if a man does not honor the 
Son, he is not of the Father, that there 
is no other name under heaven given 
among men whereby a sinner can be 
saved ; a Christian believes that the 
Christian religion is the final faith, the 
one true road for sinful men to traverse 
in their journey from the city of de- 
struction to the celestial city. He does 
not believe that Christianity is an evolu- 
tion of the religious consciousness of 
some well intentioned Jews ; he believes 
that it is a system of faith and practice 
revealed from God to man and that those 
only who accept it are saved v persons. 
Here is a broad line of demarkation, 
which no one can mistake, whether he 
believes it to be correctly drawn or not. 
The Proof of the Pudding. 

The homely proverb, "The proof of the 



pudding is in the eating," has justified 
itself in the experience of mankind. Re- 
ligions, like other tilings, are to be tested 
by their practical results. Our Lord Jesus 
Christ Himself admitted the propriety of 
this test. He said, "If you do not believe 
me, believe my works. If I do not do 
the works that no other man ever did, 
I do not ask you to believe on me." I 
was standing by the railing of a ship in 
mid-Atlantic one day when a man who 
"professed to have lived for many years in 
the far East was speaking on the subject 
of religion. He said that the Japanese, 
Chinese, and other orientals were just as 
well orT as the inhabitants of Great Brit- 
ain and the United States ; this was the 
justification of their religion, their re- 
ligion makes them happy and comfort- 
able, and therefore is as good as Chris- 
tianity. I never know whether to con- 
sider such a man a willful liar or simply 
a fool ; that he must be one or the other 
seems to me self-evident. I do not be- 
lieve any man who has ever walked 
through the narrow, stinking, dirty thor- 
oughfares of native oriental cities be- 
lieves for one minute that the people who 
dwell in those cities are as well ofT as 
those who are privileged to walk through 
parks and drive through the boulevards 
of Christian communities. Of course, I 
will not say that I am surely right in this 
opinion, but I am so firmly convinced of 
its truth that I can never change it until 
evidence is furnished. 

The penological systems of heathen 
lands are another evidence of the same 
sort. The Bible declares that the tender 
mercies of the wicked are cruel, there is 
no doubt but this is true ; they are, and if 
their tender mercies are cruel, for exam- 
ple, the treatment of women and children 
in India, Korea, Persia, and the like, 
what is to be said respecting the cruel- 
ties of these wicked folk ? What is to be 
said respecting the industrial systems of 
heathen lands, for example, the wages 
which are paid to men like ourselves for 
long days of toil? What is to be said 
respecting the agricultural systems of 
these pagan lands, where men are using 
plows such as Abraham used, and where 
famines are somewhere all the time, and 
everywhere a part of the time, so that 
not hundreds of thousands, but millions 



200 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



of people die of actual starvation year 
after year? 

Fish or Cut Bait. 

This is another colloquialism, which 
from the standpoint of eloquence may 
properly be criticized, but which on the 
ground of force may be justified. Men 
who believe that paganism is as good as 
Christianity, and who prove their faith 
by uniting with pagan religions as this 
friend has done, certainly ought not to 
live in Christian countries and share the 
advantages of civilization and at the same 
time do what they can to break down 
Christianity with its resulting institu- 
tions. 

I was talking with a friend in San 
Francisco years ago as we walked of an 
evening through the streets of that fair 
city ; as we drew near the end of the con- 
versation he said to me, "Well, Mr. 
Blanchard, I may as well honestly ac- 
knowledge it, I am really a pagan." 
"Very well," I said, "so let it be. If you 
are a pagan, I will tell you one thing that 
you will never be man enough to do." 
"What is it," he asked. I replied, "You 
will never be man enough to go and live 
among your fellow pagans ; you will live 
in a Christian country, you will draw a 
large salary, as the principal of a great 
public school, you will walk streets which 
are paved and cared for by communi- 
ties who are brought up on the Bible, you 
will live under the shadow of churches 
which make life and property safe, and 
week by week you will hear the church 
bells calling people to prayer. I do not 
suppose that anything that I may say to 
you will work a change. I think you will 
love ease and comfort, and cleanliness 
and good clothes and good books and 
papers so well that you will never seri- 
ously consider going to live among your 
fellow pagans, but as an honest man, that 
is really the thing you ought to do. You 
have no right to live in a Bible land, to 
reap the advantages of a Bible civiliza- 
tion, and at the same time to live and talk 
like a heathen, as you do." I am not pro- 
fessing to repeat words, for this conver- 
sation was held years ago, but I do not 
misrepresent its substance, and what I 
said to him in kindness, but in perfect 
plainness and as serious men ought to 
speak in a world like this, so I say to my 
unknown friend, whose letter I have been 



privileged to read: "Fish or cut bait" — 
lay down your salary, lay down your of- 
fice, go to some country where the re- 
ligion of the people is the kind of a re- 
ligion that you believe in, that is, a re- 
ligion which rejects Jesus Christ as the 
Son of God, rejects the Bible as an au- 
thoritative revelation of God's will, Re- 
jects Christianity as the final word which 
God has to speak to sinful, suffering, 
needy men. There is such a thing as 
truth. It is possible for an honest man 
to find out what it is, and this is not only 
a possibility but a duty. 



KNIGHT OF MALTA AND KNIGHT 
OF MALTA. 

Correspondent : I need information 
about the "Knights of Malta" and also 
about the "Dames of Malta." 

Answer : There are at least two orders 
in this country called "Knights of 
Malta." 

The Masonic Knight of Malta is the 
13th degree in the American Masonic 
Rite and is the one directly following 
that of the Knight Templar degree. It 
is fully described in bur book "Knight 
Templarism" (Ezra A. Cook, Pub.) 
from page 256 to 281. 

The organizations, "Daughters of 
Malta" and "Dames of Malta" are com- 
posed of women who are relatives and 
friends of the members of the Masonic 
Knights of Malta. 
"The Godless Ape of the Bride of Christ." 

The non-Masonic Knights of Malta 
has its headquarters in Philadelphia. It 
says of itself : "The Order of Knights 
of Malta is a body of men banded to- 
gether, under most binding forms, to 
comfort one another in the practice of 
the Christian religion ; to offer mutual 
assistance in time of need ; to promote 
Protestant unity ; to defend the Protest- 
ant faith against all foes whatsoever ; to 
ever defend civil and religious liberty ; 
to exercise the fullest toleration and 
charity toward all men ; to practice be- 
nevolence, and to maintain a universal 
Protestant fraternity. 

"It is a religious order, and welcomes 
all Protestants, by whatever name 
known, who love our Lord Jesus Christ, 
to enlist under its banner. 

"The Order was introduced into 
America in 1870, but was reorganized 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



201 



under the present Imperial Charter in 
1889, since which time it has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence. Only 
good men are desired ; bad men feci 
lonesome. The Order is Religious, Fra- 
ternal, Military and Beneficial. 

"The Supreme Grand Commandery 
is now the sole repository of the rites 
and ceremonies practiced during the 
Middle Ages, preserved in their entirety, 
but presented in more exquisite style by 
the aid of modern invention. The De- 
grees are of extraordinary beauty and 
sublimity, and have been extensively 
copied by modern fraternal orders. They 
are twelve in number. 

"In a very large measure we are in- 
debted to the Illustrious Order Knights 
of Malta for the Christian privileges we 
enjoy to-day. 

"It is fraternal; and by fraternity we 
mean that the lessons taught in Malta 
create that brotherhood of man, that 
closer comradeship, that broad, far- 
reaching helpfulness that we need at 
times ; that know J edge that here is a 
brother to whom you may pour out your 
heart, upon whose breast you may rest, 
upon whose confidence and valor you can 
safely trust ; yes, that fraternity that ren- 
ders help zvhen help is needed. Not 
charity. No ! The help is a right which 
belongs to every true Sir Knight of 
Malta. It is a beneficial Order, praying 
sick and death benefits, but it is optional 
with the Subordinate Commandery. 

"It is, has been, and will continue to 
be a perfect , Gibraltar in stability. Its 
ritualistic work is divinely sublime and 
of great beauty, with possibilites of elab- 
oration and impressiveness almost be- 
yond comprehension. 

"In none of its work does it in the 
slightest degree conflict with that of any 
other Order. In our ranks are thou- 
sands of Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights 
of Pythias and member of kindred or- 
ders. Its obligations are broad and in- 
spiring, and the most liberal-minded 
American can consistently accept its 
teachings." 



"Your Father knovveth." Let your heart be 
glad, 

And never grieve Him more by being sad, 

He will provide; 
"No good thing" will His love withhold from 

you. 
And lie is with you all the journey through 

Whate'er betide. 

"Your Father knoweth." In His loving hands 
How safe you are, for well He understands 

Your every need; 
And will supply it from His throne on high. 
Trust Him, till with Him you are by and by 

Most blest indeed. 

— Helen F. Jennings. 



He is happy whose circumstances 
suit his temper, but he is more excel 
lent who can suit his temper to any cir- 
cumstances. 



FUNERAL OF CARDINAL FARLEY. 

According to Associated Press reports 
the funeral of Cardinal Farley, of Xew 
York, was spectacular to a remarkable 
degree. Officials of the city, state, na- 
tion and its allies, with scores of Prot- 
estant and Jewish preachers, joined the 
Catholic hierarchy of America and its 
priests and laymen of the archdiocese of 
New York in making the funeral of 
Cardinal John M. Farley the most im- 
posing ever conducted for any church- 
man in this country. More than 10,000 
persons, including 1,000 priests, attended 
the final service in St. Patrick's Cath- 
edral. A band and 500 Marines escorted 
the procession and when the cardinals 
appeared the musicians played the "Star- 
Spangled Banner." Cardinal Gibbons of 
Baltimore, Cardinal O'Connell of Boston 
and Cardinal Begin of Quebec, occupied 
a trio of canopied thrones at the right 
of the altar. Opposite sat Archbishop 
Bonzano of Militene, Italy, apostolic 
delegate at Washington. Between them 
20 archbishops and bishops and a half 
hundred monsignori occupied places of 
honor. A chancel built especially for the 
occasion accommodated upward of t.ooo 
priests and monks, the latter clad in the 
garments of their respective orders. 

Would the display of so much pride 
and pomp be pleasing to the Xaz.arene 
who was meek and lowly of heart? 
Would any truly humble, saintly heart 
desire such ostentatious display in ob- 
servance of funeral ceremonials? Did 
the three cardinals sitting in their can- 
opied thrones think of Jesus Christ 
nailed to ITis cross? Why were the 500 
marines there and who was the superior 
officer who ordered their presence? Such 
funeral pageantry is undemocratic and 



202 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



un-American and heathen. Cardinal 
Farley was a good man and we do not 
doubt that his heart wished for a funeral 
service where Christ alone might be seen. 
— United Presbyterian (Oct. 3, 1918.). 



Question : "Railway Men's Relief As- 
sociation of America," Supreme Division 
at Muskegon, Michigan. Is it a secret, 
oathbound society with a ritual? 

Answer: Supreme Secretary, W. F. 
Murray writes under date of September 
18, 1918, "Our Association is a Fraternal 
Organization, but it is not a Secret So- 
ciety. We have a ritual which is for 
the guidance of the local Division officers 
in conducting their meetings and for the 
instructions of new members." 



To encourage our readers to give spe- 
cial attentien to the letter of John 
Quincy Adams in this number, we have 
inserted sub-heads, hoping thereby to in- 
crease the number of readers of at least 
parts of the letter. It will not lessen 
your interest in the writings of this re- 
markable man if you read the sketch by 
Judge W. F. Brannon, which we repub- 
lish from the Chicago-Record. 



"In the Mason's bib I glory 
Stretching o'er my abdomen ; 
All the innocence of ages 
It describes when it is clean. 

"Bribes and other steals unending 
The apron still doth sanctify; 
Buy it, wear it and then wash it, 
You will need it when you die." 

Thomas DeQuincy, the distinguished 
English writer, is said to have been, with 
one exception, the most brilliant mag- 
azine writer of his age. The edition of 
DeQuincy's works, in sixteen volumes, 
published by A. & C. Black, includes 
nearly all his writings. The following 
item from the pen of this great writer is 
of interest : 

"The two best known of all secret 
societies that ever have been are the 
two most extensive monuments of hum- 
bug on the one side and credulity on the 
other. They divide themselves between 
the ancient world and the modern. The 
ereat and illustrious humbug of ancient 
history was The Eleusinian Mysteries. 
The great and illustrious humbug of 



modern history, of the history which 
boasts a present and a future, as well 



as a 



past, is Freemasonry/' 



WISE SAYINGS. 

The moral standard. 



There is but one standard, — God's. 



The double standard is man-made and 
dangerous. 



One standard for man, another for 
woman ruins marriage. 



A man has no more right to demand 
purity of his wife than she of him. 



One standard for small sins and an- 
other for big ones ruins the Christian 
life. 

It is not the "size" of the sin that 
counts with God, it is your position to it. 



Some dread murder, adultery, and 
drunkenness, but smile at little sins. The 
double standard. 



Some who go to dances would judge 
harshly the pastor who did it ; but has 
God a double standard ? 



Worldlings often defend dance and 
drink for themselves, but not for Chris- 
tians. That double standard is not God's. 



The present war is the strongest proof 
and reproof of the double standard in its 
most cursed consequence upon mankind. 

Let any one suggest to the crowned 
heads of Europe to fight each other per- 
sonlly. They would resent it as coarse 
and beyond their dignity. 



But when nations go to war, killing by 
the million, killing men who never had a 
grudge against each other, then it is an 
honor. The double standard. 



Manv of the world's greatest evils of 
heart, home and nation will disappear 
from ofif the earth when God's own single 
standard of morality shall be generally 
held. — The Lutheran Herald. 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURF 



203 



dlotjtt (Jpmttrg Atoms — &ixtf)$r? atto nt lutfrfc £>tat?a 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

Quincy, 23 May, 1833. 

To Edward Livingston, Esq. 

Sir:— The position which I have un- 
dertaken to prove, beyond all possibility 
of rational denial, is, that the "cause of 
the offense," that is, of the murder of 
William Morgan, and of a multitude of 
other crimes associated with and subse- 
quent to that act, was the oath of initia- 
tion to the Masonic institution, with its 
appended penalty. 

The Oaths the Cause of Crimes. 

Had Morgan ever taken any other 
oath than that of the Entered Appren- 
tice, he would, after writing his Illustra- 
tions of Masonry, have been liable to the 
penalty which he suffered — even before 
they should be published. Like Jubela, 
Jubelo, and Jubelum, he had invoked the 
penalty upon himself; he suffered noth- 
ing more than the penalty which he had 
been assured had been executed upon 
them; nothing more than what he had 
been warned had been the standing pen- 
alties of Freemasonry from the time of 
the building of Solomon's Temple. 

All the obligations are assumed, with 
invocation of the penalty of death, upon 
him who takes the oath of admission to 
each of the several degrees ; pronounced 
with his own lips, and with a solemn ap- 
peal to God, disclaiming all evasion, all 
equivocation, all mental reservation. 

Such is the law of Masonry. 

Shall I cite to you, sir, from your able 
and eloquent report to the legislature of 
Louisiana, the powerful argument 



against the infliction of death upon any 
criminal for the commission of any 
crime whatsoever? The whole argu- 
ment is well worthy to be read and stud- 
ied, by every person conversant with the 
administration or enactment of criminal 
law, and of the deep consideration, espe- 
cially of the brethren and companions 
of the craft. But the introduction to 
it is so peculiarly appropriate to the pur- 
pose of these addresses to you, that I 
take the liberty of presenting it to you 
in your own words. 

Livingston, the Mason, on Capital Punish- 
ment. 
"I approached the inquiry into the nature 
and effect of this punishment (of death) with 
the awe becoming a man who felt most keenly 
his liability to err, and the necessity of form- 
ing a correct opinion on a point so interesting 
to the justice of the country, the life of its 
citizens, and the character of its laws. I 
strove to clear my understanding from all 
prejudices which education or early impres- 
sions might have created, and to produce a 
frame of mind fitted for the investigation of 
truth and the impartial examination of the 
arguments on this great question. For this 
purpose I not only consulted such writers on 
the subject as were within my reach, but en- 
deavored to procure a knowledge of the prac- 
tical effect of this punishment on different 
crimes in the several countries where it is 
inflicted. In my situation, however, I could 
draw but a limited advantage from either of 
these sources ; very few books on penal law, 
even those most commonly referred to, are 
to be found in the scanty collections of this 
place, and my failure in procuring informa- 
tion from the other states, is more to be re- 
gretted on this than any other topic on which 
it was requested. With these inadequate 
means, but after the best use that my facul- 
ties would enable me to make of them; after 
long reflection, and not until I had canvassed 
every argument that could suggest itself to 
my mind. 1 came to the conclusion that the 
punishment of death should find no place in 
the rode which you haze directed me to pre- 
sent." 

Now, sir, I ask of you, as the grand 



204 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



high-priest of the General Grand Royal 
Arch Chapter of the United States, to 
make to the chapters and lodges, to the 
companions and brethren under your jur- 
isdiction, that same recommendation to 
abolish the penalty of death, which with 
such deep and affecting solemnity you 
did make, in reporting a code of crim- 
inal law to the legislature of Louisiana. 
The argument of which I have here given 
only the introductory paragraph em- 
braces a very large portion, nearly one- 
half, of your report on the criminal code. 
In the system reported with it, murder 
and joining an insurrection of slaves, are 
made punishable with hard labor for life. 
At the close of this letter I annex sev- 
eral other extracts,* as well from the 
report as from the preamble to the penal 
code reported with it, indicative not only 
of your deliberate and solemn opinions, 
adverse to the punishment of death in 
all cases whatsoever, but of the abhor- 
rence which you must feel at heart, for 
those brutal mutiliations of the body 
which constitute the penalties of every 
Masonic obligation. 

Death Pledges Varnished With an Impos- 
ture of Sanctity. 
It is not, Mr. Livingston, for the poor 
purpose of bringing against you a charge 
of inconsistency before the tribunal of 
public opinion, that I address these let- 
ters to you, and call earnestly upon you 
to make this recommendation. I would, 
if possible, speak to your heart. I would 
say, you have recommended, you have 
urged by appeals "to the best feelings of 
our nature, to the supreme legislative au- 
thority of your state, the total abolition 
of the penalty of death — the reformation 
of everything cruel, indecorous, or vin- 
dictive in her code of criminal law. You 
are at the head in these United States 
of a private association of immense 
power, — co-extensive with the civilized 



*These extracts are here omitted. 



world, — knit together by ties of strong 
prevailment even when secret, scarcely 
less efficacious when divulged. When 
secret, they were riveted by pledges to 
the penalty of death and mutilation in 
a multitude of forms, given in the name 
of God, and varnished with an imposture 
of sanctity by being mingled up with the 
most solemn testimonials of Holy Writ. 
Even now, when your secrets are di- 
vulged, when your obligations and pen- 
alties have been exposed in their naked 
and undeniable nature, when you dare 
not attempt to vindicate or defend them, 
when the attempts of your brethren to 
explain them have been proved fraudu- 
lent and delusive, when your only re- 
source of apology for using them is that 
they are null and void — words utterly 
without meaning, yet you still persevere 
in adhering to them as the. ancient land- 
marks of the order. Ask yourself, sir, not 
whether this is consistent with your re- 
port and criminal code of Louisiana, but 
whether it is worthy of your character — 
of your stand in the face of your country 
and of mankind; of your reputation in 
after time ; and if it is not and can not 
be, why should you not take the occa- 
sion of the high dignity which in this 
association you have attained, to pro- 
pose and to promote its reformation? to 
divest it of that which, so long as it con- 
tinues, can never cease to shed disgrace 
upon the whole order ; of that which can 
not even be repeated without shame? 
Not Reconcilable to Moral or Christian 

Laws. 
You have taken no public notice of 
these letters in your own name, nor have 
I been particularly solicitous that you 
should. Had you ventured to assume 
the defense of the Masonic oaths, obli- 
gations, and penalties — had you pre- 
sumed to commit your name to the asser- 
tion that they can by any possibility be 
reconciled to the laws of morality, of 
Christianity, or of the land, I should 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



205 



have deemed it my duty to reply, and to 
have completed the demonstration before 
(iod and man that they can not. Of the 
multitude of defense of Masonry, which 
have been obtruded upon the public since 
this controversy arose, not one has dared 
to look these obligations in the face, and 
assert their innocence. Abuse upon the 
Antimasons for denouncing them — impu- 
dent denials of their import, so long as a 
remnant of the ragged veil of secrecy 
rent by the seceders, could be drawn over 
their nakedness — false and fraudulent 
explantions of their meaning when dis- 
closed beyond all possibility of denial, 
and mystical and mystified declarations 
of inflexible adherence to them under 
the name of the ancient landmarks of the 
institution — these have been the last re- 
sources, the forlorn hopes of the Masonic 
obligations. 

And this inflexible adherence to these 
ancient landmarks is again recommended 
to the chapters and lodges under your 
jurisdiction by the General Royal Arch 
Chapter of the United States, of which 
you are the high-priest, at their triennial 
meeting in Baltimore last November. At 
that meeting you were re-elected to the 
dignity which you had held from the 
time of your address to the companions 
and brethren of the order at your in- 
stallation in April, 1830. A letter from 
you was read at that meeting, apologiz- 
ing for your absence from it, and per- 
haps for the better accommodation of 
the grand high-priest, that meeting was 
adjourned to be held again in Novem- 
ber, 1835, at the city of Washington. 
No President of U. S. Ought Ever to Be 

Shackled by Mason Obligations. 

There is a point of view in which I 
believe this subject to be deeply inter- 
esting to the people of this Union, upon 
which I have hitherto said nothing, and 
upon which I do not wish to enlarge. 
The president of the United States 



I Andrew Jackson] is a brother of the 
craft, bound by its oaths, obligations, 
and penalties, to the exclusive favors, 
be they more or less, of which they give 
the mutual pledge. That in the troubles 
and difficulties which within the last 
seven years have befallen the craft, they 
have availed themselves of his name, 
and authority, and influence to sustain 
their drooping fortunes, as far as has 
been in their power, has been a matter 
of public notoriety. A sense of pro- 
priety has restrained him from joining 
in their processions, as he has been im- 
portunately urged by invitations to do, 
but he has not withheld from them his 
support. It is not my intention to com- 
ment upon the operation of the Masonic 
obligations, upon the two most recent 
elections to the presidency of the United 
States, or upon the official conduct of the 
president himself in relation to the in- 
stitution or its members. But whoever 
will impartially reflect upon the import 
of the Masonic obligations, and upon 
the public history of the United States 
for the last ten years, must come to the 
conclusion that no president of the 
United States ought ever to be shackled 
by such obligations, or under the self- 
assumed burden of such penalties. They 
establish between him and the institu- 
tion itself, relations not only different 
from but utterly incompatible with those 
in which his station places him with the 
whole community. That the president 
of the United States is not at this mo- 
ment an impartial person in the question 
between Masonry and Antimasonry, nor 
between Masons and Antimasons, has 
been fully authenticated, by something 
more than the effusions of your scullions 
in the Globe. He is not impartial. How 
can he be impartial after trammeling 
himself with promises, such as those 
which are now unequivocally authenti- 
cated before the world? 



206 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



The Efficacy of Masonic Oaths Upon Pub- 
lic Officers. 

And you, Mr. Livingston, Secretary 

of State of the United States, are at the 
same time Grand High-Priest of the 
General Grand Royal Arch Chapter of 
the United States; and all the Royal 
Arch chapters of -all the states of this 
Union are under the jurisdiction of that 
over which you preside. Are you im- 
partial in the question between Masonry 
and Antimasonry ? Are you, or can you 
be impartial in any question which can 
arise between Masons and Antimasons? 
You commenced your official duties as 
grand high-priest, by a sweeping de- 
nunciation of all the Antimasons in the 
Union. The Antimasons were then a 
great political party. They are so still. 
You brought against them what I have 
proved to be a most unjust accusation. 
Are you impartial between them and 
their adversaries? Has human nature 
changed its properties- since one of them 
was by a profound observer said to be, 
to hate those whom you have injured, 
"Odisse quern laeseris?" How far dis- 
tant from such a denunciation of Anti- 
masonry as that with which you gratified 
your companions and brethren at your 
installation, is the dismission for Anti- 
masonry of an officer of the United 
States, dependent on you for his place? 
It is as far as the department of state 
from the general post-office? In all the 
trials before the judicial courts of the 
state of New York, to which the abduc- 
tion and murder of Morgan has given 
rise, the efficacy of the Masonic obliga- 
tions upon sheriffs, jurors, and witnesses 
to warp them from their duty to their 
country has been lamentably proved — 
what security can the country possess 
that they will not operate in the same 
manner upon a secretary of state, or a 
president of ihe United States? Were 
the Masonic obligations equivocal in 
their character, were they even suscepti- 



ble of the explanations which have been 
attempted to be given of them, the un- 
deniable fact, that they have been un- 
derstood and acted upon according to 
their literal import, by great multitudes 
of Masons, to the total prostration of 
their duties to the laws of their country, 
would be a conclusive reason for abolish- 
ing them altogether. For if the obliga- 
tions are of a nature to be differently 
understood by different persons, their 
consistency or inconsistency with the 
laws of the land must depend upon the 
individual characters of those who have 
assumed them. Bound by the same 
oaths, some of the witnesses and jurors 
on the Masonic trials in New York have 
given their testimony and true verdicts, 
while others have obstinately refused 
their testimony to facts within their 
knowledge,, and denied their assent to 
verdicts upon the clearest proof. It has 
been judicially decided in the states of 
New York and of Rhode Island that a 
person under Masonic obligations must 
be set aside as disqualified to serve upon 
a jury in cases where one of the parties 
is a Mason, and the other is not. From 
the letter of his obligations he can not 
be impartial, and although some Masons 
may understand them otherwise, neither 
the court, nor the party whose rights and 
interests are staked upon the trial, can 
have any assurance that the trial will be 
fair. The same uncertainty must rest 
upon the administration of executive of- 
ficers. If the president of the United 
States and the secretary of state are 
bound by solemn oaths and' under hor- 
rible penalties to befriend and favor one 
class of individuals in the community 
more than another, the purposes for 
which those offices are instituted must be 
frustrated; a privileged order is palmed 
upon the community, more corrupting, 
more pernicious than the titles of no- 
bility which our constitutions expressly 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



207 



prohibit, because its privileges are dis- 
pensed and enjoined under an avowed 
pledge of inviolable secrecy. In many 
of the New York chapters, the promise 
to promote the political preferment of a 
brother of the craft, over others equally 
qualified, was one of the Royal Arch 
obligations to which the companion was 
sworn upon the penalty of death. How 
far such an obligation would influence 
the official conduct of a President of the 
United States, it is impossible to say ; 
but not more impossible than for that 
officer to fulfill the obligations of such 
a promise and to perform his duties with 
impartiality. 

How Masonry Has Defended Itself. 

At the time when you delivered the 
address upon your installation as grand 
high-priest of the general grand chapter, 
Antimasonry had already existed up- 
wards of three years. It was an exten- 
sive political party, although then in a 
great measure confined within the limits 
of the State of New York. You de- 
nounced it in no measured terms. Had 
the charges which you openly brought 
against it been true, every individual 
within the scope of your denunciation 
must have been an unworthy citizen and 
a dishonest man. Such has been the 
tone of all the defenses and defenders 
of Masonry, from that day to this. If 
the Masonic obligations were understood 
in all ordinary times not to interfere 
with the religion or politics of individ- 
uals, how can it be possible to preserve 
this nominal exception when Masonry 
itself has become the most prominent ob- 
ject of political dissension? As a politi- 
cal party, the Antimasons of the United 
States are, at this day, probably more 
numerous than the Masons. In several 
of the states, the most important elec- 
tions turn upon that point alone. The 
Antimasons openly avow the principle 
of voting for no other than Antimasonic 
candidates, How is it possible for the 



Masons to preserve themselves from the 
political bias, prompting them to repeal 
Antimasonry? They have in fact no 
such equanimity. They never fail to 
bring forward a candidate of their own 
when possible; and when they find it im- 
practicable, they unite with any party, 
whatever may be their aversion to it, 
and however obnoxious its politics, to 
exclude the Antimason. 

In your letter to the General Grand 
Royal Arch Chapter of the United 
States, of the 26th of November, 1832, 
apologizing to them for not attending at 
their meeting, then about to be held at 
Baltimore, you said thus: "You know 
(notwithstanding the allegations of our 
enemies) that the duties we owe to our 
country are paramount to the obliga- 
tions of Masonry, or to the indulgence of 
fraternal feelings." Now, sir, my ap- 
peal is to the very principle here asserted 
by yourself. I aver that your duty to 
your country is violated by the adminis- 
tration of the Masonic oaths and obliga- 
tions under penalties of death, invoked 
in the name of God — penalties multi- 
plied beyond those of the most sanguin- 
ary code that ever disgraced human leg- 
islation, and for ofTenses which the su- 
preme law of the state can not recognize 
as the most trifling of misdemeanors. 

At that triennial meeting of the Gen- 
eral Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the 
United States, a committee was ap- 
pointed "to take into consideration the 
present situation of our | the Masonic] 
institution and recommend such things 
and measures as they in their wisdom 
may consider expedient and necessary." 

The report of that committee, and the 
resolutions proposed by them and 
adopted by the General Grand Chapter 
of the United States, were the immediate 
occasion of these letters to you. This 
circumstance may account, in part, for 
what appears to have surprised some of 



208 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1 918 



your friends — that I should now hold 
you accountable for an address delivered 
so long since as April, 1830. That was 
your declaration of war against the An- 
timasons. In November, 1832, you still 
proclaimed them to be your enemies, and 
the General Grand Royal Arch Chapters, 
in full triennial meeting, repeated with 
renewal and aggravated denunciations, 
all your erroneous charges against them. 
Upon that report, and upon the resolu- 
tions with which it closed, I shall in my 
next letter submit to the consideration 
of the public some observations. 

John Quincy Adams. 



"CLIMBING ABOVE THE CLOUDS IN 
CHRISTIAN EXPERIENCE." 

By Rev. G. A. Pegram, Ph. D. 
This is a -pamphlet of 24 pages and 
cover, ^y 2 by 7 inches, price 10 cents. 
This pamphlet is a review of the teach- 
ing of Dr. Daniel Steele on the difficul- 
ties of Christian experience. 

For sale by the author, Rev. G. A. 
Pegram, Ph. D., care of General Deliv- 
ery, Davenport, Iowa. 
I sometimes feel the thread of life is 
slender, 
And soon, with me, the labor will be 
wrought ; 
Then grows my heart to other hearts 
more tender ; 
The time is short. 

— D. M. Craik. 



Among the callers whom we were 
especially pleased to greet in our office 
during the past month was Rev. W. B. 
Gottschall, of Bluffton, Ohio, and for- 
merly President of the Ohio State Asso- 
ciation. He is a leading member of the 
Mennonite Church and a willing helper 
in our work. 



Mr. J. L. Stratton, a prominent citizen 
of Ottawa, Kansas, did not get to the 
office as he intended, but we enjoyed a 
visit with him in our home that was of 
more than usual interest to us. It is 
some forty-seven years ago that Mr. 
Stratton and the Editor of the Cynosure 
became the first colporteurs of the Na- 
tional Christian Association. We were 



at that time students in Wheaton College 
and took up this work for the summer 
vacation at the instance of Charles A. 
Blanchard, now the president of the col- 
lege. 



A WORD IN SEASON. 

BY PROF. J. R. MILLIN. 

Dr. C. A. Blanchard's article in the 
October Cynosure is timely. The work- 
ers in every moral reform need a boost 
now and then. Moral reform — -what an 
unpopular proposition it is ! Moral re- 
form — what an up-hill proposition it is ! 
And, mirabile dictn every new moral re- 
form js as unpopular as the last. The 
world never learns a bit of sense. • The 
old world, stupid and unprogressive mor- 
ally, always fights against the best things, 
always tries in one way and another to 
kill its best and most useful men. The 
friends of every moral reform need a 
boost now and then. And it is especially 
so in the case of the reform represented 
by the Cynosure. 

As every thoughtful student of affairs 
may see, Satan especially needs the 
Lodge in his business, for it is his Mas- 
terpiece as a device to defeat the Chris- 
tian religion. The lodge is the great Hun 
set against the allied forces of Christian- 
ity. And by its propaganda the cunning 
Hun, the Lodge, has won-over the large 
churches. Think of it — the churches 
pro-lodge or neutral ! Here is the im- 
possible achieved — Christianity and anti- 
Christ merged. Abel's altar and Cain's 
altar joined together! The latest victim 
of this propaganda is the United Pres- 
byterian church. That church was heroic 
in the anti-slavery fight, and for half a 
century it was heroic in the anti-lodge 
fight ; but of late through the effective 
propaganda of the Hun, the lodge, the 
once splendid voice of the LTnited Pres- 
byterian church first stammered and then 
became silent. What wonder that in the 
presence of such a spectacle as that some 
become discouraged and are ready to 
quit the fight? The voice of a veteran 
like Dr. Blanchard sounds good in our 
ears at such a time as this. 

Whether we feel encouraged or dis- 
couraged about the status of the fight 
against the Lodge, one thing is plain — if 
Jesus meant what He said in John 14:6 
and if Paul meant what he said in Ga- 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



209 



lations 1 : 8, the church must shake the 
lodge Or fail iu its mission of carrying 
the Gospel to the world. The lodge by 
successful propaganda makes the church 
allow two methods of salvation — one via 
the Cross and the other via the Lodge. 
Which way will the world take? Satan 
is surely satisfied with the situation. But 
the lodge must go. And the Lodge, soon- 
er or later, shall go. "Every plant which 
my Heavenly Father planted not shall be 
rooted up." Let us all stay with the 
colors till we go over the top, till the 
Lodge is chased out of the world. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 



LABORER WORTHY HIS HIRE 

In every crisis of national life the 
clergymen of America have stood in the 
forefront of patriotic endeavor ; in every 
human crisis they have brought support, 
and guidance, and comfort to souls in 
desperate need. Now it is time to meas- 
ure the work and the needs of the 
preacher and pastor as men in other de- 
partments of work to-day are being 
measured, that their value may be rightly 
appraised and their needs fairly met. 

The cost of living has greatly in- 
creased. Clothing, food, fuel, and all 
the daily incidentals that go to make up 
American life have gone up from thirty 
to a hundred per cent. And the loans 
and taxes for Freedom's war are ever 
making deeper drives into the purse. 
Wage-earners in every department of 
the nation's work have been demanding 
more income, and their demands have 
been recognized as just and necessary. 

Your pastor is not a cheap man nor an 
unskilled laborer. He has brought long, 
careful training to his task. He was 
chosen with scrutinizing care as to his 
qualifications, and he is being measured 
to-day by high and exacting require- 
ments in the performance of his work. 
Carry that measurement to its just con- 
clusion. What salary would you expect 
to pay to the trained man in business of 
whom such important work and expert 
ability were required? 

Your pastor must be a man among 
men, a man of force, tact, and agreeable 
oe-rsonality, a £ood mixer, a man of 
knowledge, wisdom, a n d authority, 
whose presence commands respect and 
whose word carries conviction. He must 



be able to influence men and women, win 
their confidence, kindle their enthusiasm, 
direct their energies, and organize their 
working powers. He must be full of 
sympathy, ready with consolation, a 
strength in weakness, a bright light in 
times of darkness, and a never- failing 
source of inspiration to the souls of his 
people. You expect all this of him. 

Your pastor, also, must be the success- 
ful head and center of your organized 
church activities, business, social, and 
spiritual. On occasion, or as a regular 
part of his task, he must be an expert 
money-raiser. You engage him as your 
chief and leader, the general manager of 
your church, if not its actual creator, or 
savior from its difficulties. You put upon 
him a burden and a responsibility you 
would never dream of entrusting to any 
cheap man in business. 

When you have listed all the qualities 
and services you ask of your pastor, 
make out the bill for the amount your 
church ought to pay for such a man, and 
then move things to see that the church 
pays that bill. Never mind what has been 
done in the past, nor what long habit has 
accustomed the church to believe can be 
done. The standing record of clergy- 
men's salaries throughout this great rich 
nation is a pitiful shame, and belies the 
real heart and fairness of the American 
people. 

The minister of your church is a hu- 
man being like the rest of us, and he is 
feeling the pressure of increased cost of 
living just as we do. But no govern- 
ment decree has raised his salary. No 
corporation or trade-union stands back 
of him. He does not go on strike. He 
simply trusts his people, and works faith- 
fully for them seven davs a week, and 
many nights, and struggles to look re- 
spectable, and pays his bills, and per- 
forms the miracles expected of him. — 
From The Literary Digest, August 31, 
1918. 



APPLICATION COMING. 

Have you joined the commuters, Mrs. 
Nurich ? 

No, but I'll £et Pa to put in an appli- 
cation. — The Buffalo Express. 



The best theology is the fruit of 



kneeologv. 



210 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



We commend to your attention the 
sketch in this number from the Chicago 
Record, of John Quincy Adams, whose 
valuable letters have been running in our 
magazine now for some months. In a 
way it is a good reply to a statement 
recently published in a Masonic paper 
that the ability of John Quincy Adams 
was very greatly overestimated and that 
he owed his position and fame more to 
his father than to any other source. 



There is nothing like the first glance 
we get at duty, before there has been any 
special pleading of our affections or in- 
clinations. ' Duty is never uncertain at 
first. It is only after we have got in- 
volved -in the mazes and sophistries of 
wishing that things were otherwise than 
they are, that it seems indistinct. Con- 
sidering a duty is often only explaining 
it away. Deliberation is often only dis- 
honesty. God's guidance is plain, when 
we are true. — F. W. Robertson. 



THE QUAKER ODD-FELLOW. 

BY A QUAKER PASTOR. 

It was a beautiful Sabbath morning in 
autumn. Not a cloud was in sight, and 
as the sun arose and the day began, it 
proved to be one of those fine fall days, 
so warm and pleasant that everyone 
wanted to be out of doors at least a part 
of the day. 

It was an unusual day in Auborn, a 
small town in Iowa — a town not crowded 
with special days or special occasions. 
But today Ralph Martin was to close his 
third year as pastor of the Friends 
Church, and was to preach his farewell 
sermon. 

There were four other churches in 
Auborn, but none so large and none 
more popular than the usually called 
"Quaker Church." This church had 
long held the ascendency so far as mem- 
bership was concerned, for it was a 
Quaker settlement fifty years ago. But 
with the coming of Ralph Martin three 
years before, it had gained a reputation 
for spiritual life and power, as well as 
for active Christian service. 

Rev. Mr. Martin had found upon his 
arrival in Auborn a membership of three 
hundred and fifty. Among the members 
were many older people, who only at- 
tended the morning service, and another 
larger number who came only on spe- 
cial occasions, or when convenient, if at 
all. The young people were scattered 
and went with the crowd. 

Soon after looking over the field, the 



young pastor began a series of revival 
meetings. For days, and until after the 
second week, very little was accom- 
plished. He preached a clean, clear, full 
gospel message. 

At the beginning of the third week the 
house was filled to its utmost capacity. 
He preached one night on the "Sinful- 
ness of the Lodge System," and while he 
did it lovingly and kindly, yet he showed 
plainly" that the lodge in its influence was 
in opposition to the church. Another 
night he struck the divorce evil, declar 
ing that it was breaking down the sanc- 
tity and sacredness of the home. His 
sermon . on temperance was for the out 
and out prohibition of the saloon. He 
touched also the other popular evils of 
the day. He preached on love, and de- 
clared it was possible for one nation to 
love another nation. 

Men were mad, and the lodges were 
up in arms. However, the break came 
and old meri, old women, drunkards, 
loafers and those of every class' were 
yielding to the message. Salvation was 
the only topic of conversation for days 
in Auborn. A show billed for the opera 
house was cancelled. An attempted dance 
was a miserable failure. But in spite 
of this every sermon was opposed, for it 
pinched somebody- The saloon element 
was angry and became Rev. Mr. Mar- 
tin's bitter enemy. Lodge men swore 
to fight him while he remained, and to 
blacken his name if possible. 

But the church grew, the Sunday 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



211 



School enlarged, and now the three years 
of active work were drawing to a close. 

It was 9 o'clock and Ralph Martin was 
sitting at his desk in his study. One 
hand was at his forehead, the other 
holding a roughly sketched outline for 
his morning sermon. 

"That is the best 1 can do," he said, 
laying it down upon the open page of his 
Bible. Then he fell upon his knees for 
a few minutes' communion with God. 
As he arose from that season of prayer 
he seemed as one buckling on the whole 
armor of God for some great battle, and 
so it was. 

At 10:30 the church was filled and 
still the people kept crowding in. Rev. 
Mr. Martin joined in the opening song 
service. After the devotional services 
the 48th Psalm was read, and the last 
three verses were taken as a text. He 
stated that before Jerusalem was ar- 
rayed an army ready for attack. David 
asked these soldiers to consider well the 
bulwarks of the city, her walls, her tow- 
ers, her palaces, and then go away, for 
it was a useless attack ; or, if David was 
talking of his own people, he asked them 
to consider all these things and feel per- 
fectly safe. 

"Now," said he, launching into his 
sermon, "Zion means the church of God. 
That body is made up of believers in 
Jesus Christ, who know for themselves 
that they are born of God. So we ask 
you today, to walk about the church of 
God with us, and consider her strength, 
her unseen powers, her towers, and go 
away and declare it is useless to fight 
against God and his church." 

He pointed his hearers to Peter's con- 
fession of Christ, that the doctrines upon 
which Jesus had built his church were, 
1st, The Deity of Jesus; 2nd, Faith in 
God; 3rd, Divine Revelation; and 4th, 
a Personal Confession of him as Savior 
and King. Enlarging upon these, he 
declared that the church was built upon 



these four great doctrines, and stated no 
other organization was to be compared 
with the church, since all others are of 
human origin. At this point he referred 
to the lodge, and said: "Give me time, 
money and a sound body, and in a few 
years I can fathom all the mysteries of 
all the so-called secret societies. But it 
will take you eighty years on earth and 
a long eternity in heaven to understand 
the mysteries of Godliness." 

All the present day secret lodges have 
been organized within two hundred 
years, and are founded upon false tradi- 
tions, for selfish and unholy purposes. 
They are only imitations, and we say to 
them, "Go away today and stop your 
useless and endless effort to overthrow 
the church of God !" 

• Turning to the church he cried; "Oh, 
Christians ! Arise ! Gird on the armor 
of God. Our motto is Upward and On- 
ward. The everlasting arms are under- 
neath. As long as there is power in 
Jesus' blood and in his precious name, 
the church of God will stand, and this 
God shall be our God forever and for- 
ever." 

A scene followed the sermon. Lodge 
men had grown to hate the very name of 
"Quaker." They were present this day 
in large numbers, but they cowered in 
their seats. The man of God had defied 
them. 

When the service came to a close the 
people gathered around the preacher, 
and with tears grasped the hand of the 
man who had won such a place in their 
hearts and who had so wonderfully 
preached that day. A smaller group of 
men, however, gathered near the door 
and spoke in low tones of how roughly 
they had been handled and insulted. 

Ralph Martin's work was done in Au- 
born. His farewell sermon had been the 
climax of the three years of labor. He 
had kept many young men from going 
into the lodges, in spite of the fact that 



— - 



212 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



it was always reported that every ser- 
mon had added numbers to their mem- 
bership. 

No sooner had Rev. Mr\ Martin ten- 
dered his resignation than the question 
of his successor became a very interest- 
ing theme in Auborn. 

Those who represented the spiritual 
element of the church relaxed and were 
wondering what next should be done. 
They were praying that the right one 
might be chosen to fill the place of this 
man of God. Just then there came an 
unlooked for turn in church affairs. An 
element that had been cowed and cor- 
nered for three years, and held in sub- 
jections by the preaching and courage- 
ous efforts of the pastor, now leaped into 
the ascendency. 

A committee meeting was called. Re- 
ports were made, showing a different 
spirit from that which had permeated 
the Auborn -church. David Penman, a 
resident minister, arose and proposed 
that Josiah Hamilton act as chairman. 
Rev. Mr. Penman had been recorded a 
minister in other days, when he could 
talk and pray. With the coming of the 
pastoral system he had soured on the 
church and fought every progressive 
movement. Hamilton, whom he had 
named as chairman, was a wealthy man, 
but unconverted. He was known to be 
a Mason. For this very reason he had 
been named as chairman. No sooner 
was this accomplished than the spiritu- 
ally-minded began to realize that "while 
men slept the enemy had sown tares." 

Hamilton, as chairman of the pastoral 
committee, took his seat without an 
apology. Caleb McCall, the corner gro- 
cery-man, an old soldier and a popular 
man with the outside world, jumped to 
his feet ; he grew excited and began to 
tell how the church had been abused by 
unwise teachers, and how it was looked 
upon by the outsider. He said : "Our 
church is not in unity with the other 



churches of Auborn, and we haven't had 
a man here for years who was popular 
with the other churches. Now, I am for 
getting a good man, a smart man, a man 
who can preach the Gospel and let other 
things alone. It is not the preacher's 
business to talk about war and secret 
orders and politics and things that don't 
concern him. I am willing to give $50 
toward the support of a man like that, 
but if we get another man who talks as 
Rev. Mr. Martin has, and drives men 
away instead of drawing -them, and in- 
sults the business men, I shall not give 
one cent." Hamilton indorsed the re- 
marks,, and one or two others nodded 
approval. 

Other members tried to explain that 
the past three years had been the best 
years the church had ever seen, that 
more souls have been saved, more new 
members had been added, and there had 
been a larger attendance at church, Sun- 
day School and Endeavor meetings, but 
all to no avail. 

The pastoral meeting had been packed 
with sympathetic members, and to the 
surprise of all had a voting majority 
present. After a thorough discussion of 
the matter, all present were aware of the 
fact that without a radical change there 
would be trouble for the Friends in Au- 
born. They were further surprised when 
Josiah Hamilton stated that there was a 
well known man who could be secured if 
they acted at once. He is a man well 
known in the Yearly Meeting, and liked 
by everybody, especially by the young 
people. We shall have to raise more 
money for him, but to my mind he is a 
stronger man. If the committee would 
like to consider his name, we have a let- 
ter from him and a proposition to place 
before the committee. Emaline Cox, 
who had said nothing up to this time, 
seeing that a deep laid scheme had been 
planned and was being carried out, asked 
to whom this man had written. No one 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



213 



answered. Again came the question: 
"Who wrote to him?'' but still there was 
no answer. "It seems to me a little 
hasty," she said, "to present the name of 
any one here until we have deeided about 
what we need. We must look at the 
facts. Our church is in a splendid con- 
dition. Not one of us, I am sure, desires 
to make a backward move." 

That was enough. A call was made 
for the letter, and it was read. It clearly 
showed from the way in which it was 
worded that some one had been in cor- 
respondence with him, and had really 
made him an offer. He expressed his 
willingness to come at once if his propo- 
sition was accepted. He was to have 
$800 and the parsonage. The letter was 
signed Robert Stanley. 

A discussion of the man followed. All 
agreed Rev. Mr. Stanley was one of the 
most popular men in the Yearly Meet- 
ing. His name regularly appeared on 
some of the most important boards and 
committees. He was always a leader in 
discussions on the "floor of the Yearly 
Meeting. Taking into consideration that 
he was young and popular and that the 
element that proposed his name was 
heartily in favor of him, others con- 
sented in a few minutes. Almost before 
any one knew it, the church had ex- 
tended a call to Robert Stanley to be- 
come pastor. 

The call was at once accepted and in 
a few weeks he and his family were 
nicely located in the parsonage, and he 
took up the pastoral work. 

Rev. Mr. Stanley little saw what was 
before him in the days that were to fol- 
low. He was a good speaker and soon 
became very popular with a large num- 
ber of people in Auborn. He drew many 
people to the church, but there was al- 
ways" something, lacking. He preached 
the truth, no one found fault with what 
he said, but always something was un- 
said, left out, that was missed by the 



deeply spiritual. It was the personal 
application, real heart interest in those 
for whom he preached. In none of his 
sermons did he ever mention specific 
sins or call anything sinful. No one 
ever felt condemned. Sin was always 
an abstract — never a concrete thing. To 
the spiritual elements in the church this 
was a strange, new departure. His ser- 
mons seemed little more than dogmatic 
essays, or orations, without forceful ap- 
plication. 

Six months had passed when matters 
reached a climax. Not one word had 
come from the pulpit against the saloon 
element, although it was working hard 
to again establish a saloon in Auborn. 
Secret orders were enthusiastically try- 
ing to build up their lodges, but there 
was never a word of protest. Everyone 
knew when the fight would be and how 
the forces would rally if only their old 
pastor were amongst them. 

Two of the members at last privately 
began to investigate the cause of Rev. 
Mr. Stanley's silence. 

They asked him to preach a special 
sermon on Temperance, leaving him to 
take his own stand. He refused, kindly 
explaining that there were different 
ways of dealing with the saloon, and he- 
thought, as a minister, it was not his 
business to say anything about it. He 
thought the city council would attend to 
the matter of regulating or licensing sa- 
loons, if in their judgment there ought 
to be a saloon in Auborn. 

The investigation proved that Robert 
Stanley was a policy man, and stood at 
least in sympathy with the saloon ele- 
ment. The next few days brought a 
still greater surprise to the Friends 
church. 

A series of revival meetings had been 
in progress in Auborn for over a week, 
in which the churches were united. The 
evangelist secured was an Eastern man, 
and they really knew nothing about him 



214 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



except by reputation, until he came. The 
attendance was splendid. The four pas- 
tors were on the platform. There was 
scarcely an empty seat in the large audi- 
ence room. 

The evangelist was in the middle of 
his sermon. He was talking about good 
works and charities carried on by the 
church and other organizations. He 
then took occasion to eulogize secret 
orders and the Odd Fellows in particu- 
lar, speaking lightly of any one who 
would oppose such organizations. Then 
he exclaimed : "To prove that they are 
doing a good work; and that they are 
religious, uplifting and ennobling organi- 
zations, your four true, noble-hearted 
pastors stand as examples of true Odd- 
Fellowship". They are members and 
leaders in the lodge. The other pastors 
did not care. They took it as an honor. 
They, wore the badge and f ellowshipped 
with Odd-Fellows everywhere. But 
Robert Stanley colored deeply, then 
turned ashy pale, as if he would faint. 
As every eye was turned upon him he 
grew nervous, looking the very picture 
of a lost, ruined, helpless, doomed man. 

When the service closed he was gone, 
no one knew where. With the usual 
handshaking and social expressions the 
audience departed. 

The night that followed the meeting 
brought no sleep at the Friends parson- 
age. Robert Stanley was a ruined man. 
His sin had found him out. A few years 
before, while pastor in Charleston, he 
had listened to the persuasion of some 
of his best paying members, and had 
finally joined the Odd-Fellows' lodge. 
It was with a definite promise from the 
lodge that his membership should always 
be kept a secret. As long as he had re- 
mained, no member of the church had 
ever suspicioned such a thing except 
those who were lodgemen. When he 
removed to Auborn he found the Odd- 
Fellows' lodge so near extinction, owing 



to the late pastor Martin's strenuous 
efforts, that he moved cautiously. He 
had not dreamed of being thus exposed, 
and especially at a time when he was 
being considered a coward and afraid to 
speak on temperance. All night he 
wrestled in prayer, and talked with his 
wife about what they should do. He 
never again could face the church and 
town, justify himself and remain an 
Odd-Fellow. He had long been tired of 
it all, and had really never intended to 
keep up his payments and connections 
with the lodge. But now his work was 
done. He could not go back to the 
meetings. He could not meet the world. 
What should he do? 

It was a night of nights for him, a 
struggle like that of Jacob of old. But 
before daylight Robert Stanley and his 
wife had surrendered on their knees be- 
fore God. The victory came. 

Rising from prayer, Robert Stanley 
turned to his wife and exclaimed : 
"Alice, if you knew all that I submitted 
to in being initiated into the lodge I fear 
you would despise me, and never love 
me again. I don't understand how I 
ever went so far, but thank God it is 
over." 

At ten o'clock that day the elders of 
the church called at the parsonage for 
the hardest task they had ever per- 
formed. Instead of meeting the man 
they anticipated seeing they met a kind, 
tender-hearted penitent. They came to 
ask him to resign. The church could not 
submit to such an insult. But when they 
were ushered into the parlor by the kind 
pastor, and saw in his face the signs of 
the struggle through which he had 
passed, it became very hard for them to 
explain why they had called. 

After a few formal expressions pas- 
tor Stanley began slowly, and in a trou- 
bled voice : "Friends, I suppose your 
visit to me this morning is one that is 
hard for all of us. But if I can make it 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURIi 



215 



any easier for you I shall do so. I have 
a confession to make to you, if you will 
listen. Ten years ago, just after I had en- 
tered the ministry, I went to Charleston 
as pastor. Our membership was made 
up largely of worldly people, as so many 
city churches are. They paid me a good 
salary and furnished a good parsonage. 
I was asked to say nothing on prohibi- 
tion, peace, and secret orders, and I soon 
discovered that many of our members 
were lodge men. Those who were not, 
were fearful all the time that some of 
them would be insulted if the subject 
was ever mentioned. 

"The general superintendent encour- 
aged me to be wise and remain for a 
term of years. I took this to mean keep 
my mouth shut and compromise the 
truth. I did so. My friends soon began 
to urge me to join the lodge, saying it 
would give me a greater influence, en- 
large our attendance, and help the 
church. I was loth to do it, but being 
pressed hard I agreed to join the Odd- 
Fellows. I was finally made a member 
but it was done quietly and with a prom- 
ise that it would always be kept a secret. 
I was not through with the initiation be- 
fore I was ashamed of myself and them. 
My repulsion for the lodge grew every 
time I attended, but I was in and could 
not get out without publicity. I saw I 
was united with the toughest element 
in Charleston. I have been compelled 
by this same element to favor the orders, 
and be liberal toward them, when my 
own heart condemned me. 

"I have pled for liberty in the Yearly 
Meeting with a lie on my lips, and so 
have others of our preachers. I have 
said nothing lately, but when the evan- 
gelist grasped my hand he gave me the 
grip, and I responded, little thinking 
what it would mean. My exposure, I 
want to say to you, last night came like 
a stroke of lightning. I have favored 



the secret element in the church here, 
for they championed my coming.'' 

He buried his face in his hands and 
sobbed like a child. 

Up to this time the elders had said 
nothing, but sat in utter astonishment, 
grieved and yet full of sympathy. Finally 
gaining control of himself, he began 
again: "I don't know how you feel 
about it, or what you desire me to do. I 
have been looked upon by the church as 
one of your leading ministers, and all 
the time I knew I was a traitor. I am 
now ready to resign and be thus hum- 
bled, or to make a complete public con- 
fession before the church and the world. 
I have not slept one minute since the 
meeting last night, but have settled the 
matter with the Lord and am now ready 
to take the worst and face the world." 

A long silence followed. Then James 
Harvey spoke for the elders. He said : 
"Brother Stanley, we called upon you 
expecting to ask you to resign. We 
have been greatly surprised and aston- 
ished at your confession. Of course 
we are glad to hear you state the matter 
fully and respect you for it. \Ye can- 
not understand, however, how one who 
was called of God could be so deceitful 
and yet be so useful and respected. If 
your confession means that you are 
ready to leave the lodge and say so pub- 
licly, and thus redeem the church from 
insult and disgrace brought upon us last 
night, I am sure the church could not do 
less than gladly and freely forgive you. 
and we will rejoice that you have come 
out of these things." The others nodded 
their assent. 

"Well I am ready," said Robert Stan- 
ley, "to face anybody. I have had 
enough. I have broken league with hell, 
and from this time forth I shall be found 
on the side of Christ and shall preach 
the whole Gospe! of Christ." 

After further conversation with Rev. 



216 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



Mr. Stanley all agreed that the sooner 
it was over the better. A season of 
prayer followed which was a time of 
real contrition and special blessing to all, 
and the committee departed. 

It was the following Sabbath morn- 
ing. The news had spread like wildfire. 
Everyone knew that trouble was brew- 
ing at the "Quaker" church. The tat- 
tlers tattled, and the meddlers meddled, 
and the gossipers gossiped. Even - the 
street loafers discussed the possible out- 
come of the strange affair. Auborn was 
stirred to her very center. On this Sab- 
bath morning/ when the bell ceased ring- 
ing, the Old Friends' church was again 
filled to its utmost capacity. Robert 
Stanley entered the pulpit as usual, a 
smile playing on his face. After the 
usual song and prayer service Rev. Mr. 
Stanley rose to speak. The silence 
seemed oppressive, as if the audience 
was holding its breath. He announced 
as his text the third verse of the 91st 
Psalm, "Surely He shall deliver thee 
from the snare of the fowler." "God is 
the deliverer," he said, "the devil is the 
fowler. We are the victims. Then we 
should read it : 'Surely God will deliver 
us from the snare of the devil..' " 

In the forty minutes that followed 
Rev. Mr. Stanley uncovered the devil's 
snares, net, and traps with rough hands, 
from chewing gum and cigarettes to 
card playing, dancing, tobacco using, 
novel reading, swearjng and saloons. On 
the liquor question he took a square 
stand for prohibition, and no community 
ever received a greater ally than Auborn 
in the conversion of Robert Stanley. 
But on he went, "The next trap," an- 
nounced the speaker, "is one in which I 
have been caught." The audience 
seemed to lean forward. "Secret orders 
and lodges, yea, the whole lodge system, 
is a broad spreading net to catch men. 
Baited and made enticing by many dain- 
ty morsels, she is doing her awful work." 



Here he gave his experience with the 
Odd-Fellows, adding a few details to 
what he had told the elders, even de- 
scribing some of the scenes of the initia- 
tion. When he had finished he stood 
with tears running down his face, before 
a weeping audience. He stepped for- 
ward and with a firm face and clenched 
fist dared the world to deny the facts he 
had stated. "For," said he, " 'God is 
light and there is no darkness in Him at 
all.' God still lives and Auborn Friends' 
church is a branch of the church of God 
and the forgiven traitor shall from this 
day forward be her strongest defender 
from these darkest traps of hell. I have 
been used as a decoy. Now I am going 
to be a gatling gun. 

"1. I find all secret orders and lodges 
unbiblical. 

"2. Their charity is all pretense, for 
they only help themselves and then just 
what has been paid for. 

"3. Their influence upon men is for 
evil. 

"4. The 'good men' in the lodge are 
traitors and cowards, afraid to come out. 

"5. Their initiations are heathenish 
and outlandish. 

"6. They are Christless institutions. 

"7. They are deadening to any man's 
spiritual life. 

"8. They separate men from the home 
and cause many separations in families. 

"9. Wicked men are often the leaders 
and teachers. 

"10. They are condemned of God (II 
Cor. 6:14). They are condemned by the 
most spiritual churches. 

"Now with these reasons and God's 
promise to deliver us from the snare of 
the fowler, we shall surely steer clear of 
the lodge." 

The benediction was pronounced. The 
audience went out. Four years Robert 
Stanley pastored and preached in Au- 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



217 



born. But from the Sabbath of Robert 

Stanley's confession to this day there 
has never been an organization of < Md- 
Fellows in the town. 

It was the Odd- Fellows' funeral 
sermon. 



JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 
By Judge W. F. Brannan. 

The House of Representatives in 1836, 
I think, adopted a rule prohibiting the in- 
troduction of petitions for the abolition 
of slavery. The adoption of this rule 
was vehemently opposed by John Quincy 
Adams, and several other northern mem- 
bers, but it carried by a very large major- 
ity. Adams, on principle, was opposed 
to the institution of slavery, but he re- 
spected the compromises of the constitu- 
tion on that subject, and was not dis- 
posed to interfere with it in states where 
it existed by law. But the right of peti- 
tion he regarded as one that was sacred, 
protected by the constitution and beyond 
the power of congress. He called it the 
"gag rule" and treated it with the utmost 
contempt. He invariably presented . pe- 
titions addressed to congress, which 
were sent to him, whether they asked for 
the abolition of slavery, and whether he 
favored their objects or not. 

Threats were repeatedly made to have 
him brought before the bar of the house 
to be publicly censured by the speaker, 
for his persistent violations of this par- 
ticular "gag rule." He defiantly said 
that neither threats of public censure nor 
the fact of public censure would ever 
deter him from upholding and defending 
at all times and at all hazards the sacred 
right of petition. The boldness and cour- 
age of Adams at length brought ridicule 
on the rule, made it inoperative, and it 
was rescinded in 1845. It was the first 
and only attempt in our legislative his- 
tory to restrict the right of petition. 
Adams' Petition Caused Trouble. 

In January, 1842, a petition purporting 
to come from citizens of Haverhill, 
Mass., asking for a dissolution of the 
union, w r as sent to Adams. It was ad- 
dressed to congress and Adams was re- 
quested to present it to the house. True 
to his convictions on the question of peti- 
tion, he did as requested, but at the same 
time took occasion to denounce in the 
strongest language the object it sought. 



There was at that time in the house 
several hot-bloods from the south, all of 
them vvhigs, who were anxiously waiting 
for an opportunity to take vengeance on 
Adams for his contemptuous disregard 
of the "gag rule." The opportunity, as 
they thought, had now come and they 
hastened to take advantage of it. Henry 
A. Wise of Virginia, Tom Marshall of 
Kentucky, and others met and resolved 
to ask for a vote of censure on Adams 
for his presentation of the Haverhill peti- 
tion. Marshall was a new member, who 
came from a family distinguished for its 
intellectual strength, and was himself a 
man of considerable oratorical powers. 

A resolution of censure was prepared 
and to Marshall was assigned the duty of 
presenting it and of making the opening 
speech in support of it. T.he others were 
to follow. The time for this assault on 
Adams was agreed on and the order of 
speaking duly arranged. 

Marshall offered the resolution on the 
day fixed and in a carefully prepared 
speech demanded that the house place on 
record its earnest condemnation of the 
man who in the interests of abolitionism 
and at its behest had insulted the house 
and the country by presenting for con- 
sideration a treasonable petition for the 
dissolution of the union. He spoke about 
an hour and Wise followed. 

Wise and Marshall Attack Adams 

Wise was the reputed author of the 
motto in the campaign of 1840 — "The 
union of the whigs for the sake of the 
union." The speeches of both Marshall 
and W 7 ise were full of patriotic sentiment 
and devotion to the union, and of the 
duty of the house to enter its indignant 
protest against the man who had the 
hardihood to give the slightest encour- 
agement to the spirit of disunion by vol- 
untarily offering to the house a petition 
which prayed for disunion. The great 
body of the members listened with curi- 
osity and amazement to these two 
speeches. The fact that such a resolu- 
tion would be offered was known to but 
few. and the matter consequently took 
nearly every one by surprise. 

Mr. Adams now lacked but a few days 
of being 75 years of age. When the ven- 
erable ex-president rose to reply to the 
speeches of Marshall and Wise members 
from all parts of the house crowded 
around him. His voice was weak, but 



218 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 191§ 



was the only sound that broke the still- 
ness of the chamber. His frame was 
tremulous with emotion, but he was en- 
tirely self-possessed. 

He would, he said, have but little to 
say in defense of himself. His life had 
been spent in the service of his country, 
and to the advancement of its interests he 
would devote his few remaining years. 
The right of petition was a sacred one, 
protected by the constitution, and any 
abridgment of that right was a blow at 
the rights and liberties of the people. 
When the right of petition was taken 
away from the people their rights and 
liberty were gone. For himself he would 
defend the right of petition whenever it 
was assailed or in any manner or for any 
purpose sought to be imperiled. 
Kindly Pity for Marshall. 

On the whole he spoke not unkindly of 
Marshall. Marshall, he said, bore the 
name and was, he understood, a near rel- 
ative of Chief Justice Marshall, whose 
friendship he had enjoyed while that 
great man was in life, and whose mem- 
ory he still revered. Marshall, he con- 
tinued, was a new member of much tal- 
ent and probably of good intentions^ who 
had much to learn of the character and 
schemes of the conspirators, who, with- 
out the courage and manhood to take the 
lead in this proceeding, had, by flattering 
his vanity, made him their dupe and their 
tool. Marshall's sense of shame would, 
he was sure, in a short time make some 
atonement for the false and unworthy 
position in which, through the intrigues 
of others, he had allowed himself to be 
placed. 

But it was to Wise, who, he believed, 
was the author and the active spirit of 
the movement against him, that Adams 
principally addressed himself. The phil- 
ippics of Demosthenes were mild in com- 
parison with the terrific scourging he 
gave to Wise. Referring to the duel be- 
tween Graves and Cilley, in which Cilley 
was killed and in which Wise acted as 
the second and the adviser of Graves, 
Adams, pointing his finger toward Wise, 
pronounced him a man who had come 
into the halls of congress with the blood 
of a murdered representative of the peo- 
ple dripping from his hands and clinging 
to his skirts. He predicted that if the 
banner of disunion was ever raised and 



arms ever used to break up the union, 
these things would not come from north- 
ern abolitionists, who were few in num- 
ber and men of peace, but would be 
found in other localities much nearer to 
the homes of the men who had origi- 
nated and were supporting the resolution 
for censure. 

Wise Covered with Confusion. 

Never had men so sorely miscalcu- 
lated the strength, vigor, resources and 
temper, when thoroughly roused, of the 
aged adversary they had provoked. His 
speech, unanswerable in its soundness 
and force of its logic and unequaled in 
the illustrations drawn from history, cov- 
ered with ridicule the man against whom 
it was directed. Only one of those who 
had urged Marshall to offer the resolu- 
tion of censure and who had pledged 
themselves to stand by him ventured to 
open their lips after Adams had spoken. 
That man was Wise, and his speech was 
more in answer to allusions made to him- 
self and more like apology and explana- 
tion than anything else. 

Marshall was of intemperate habits 
and given to occasional sprees. When he 
found that his associates had deserted 
him he went on a spree that lasted a 
number of days. Years after Marshall 
was asked what he thought of John 
Ouincy Adams.' 

"Sir," he answered, "Adams once gave 

me the d st lashing on the floor of the 

house that was ever administered to mor- 
tal man, but it taught me more of consti- 
tutional rights and constitutional liberty 
than I had ever dreamed of. The man 
that provoked a controversy with Adams 
was lucky if he got off with a whole 
hide." 

The suggestion of Adams that the 
spirit of disunion was far more likely to 
take active form among the slaveholders 
of the South than the abolitionists of the 
North was verified much sooner than he 
at the time expected. In less than twenty 
years after the speech was made the very 
men who sought to degrade him for pre- 
senting a petition for the dissolution of 
the union — an event which he always re- 
garded as among the greatest of calami- 
ties — became themselves leaders in 
armed rebellion for the destruction of the 
union. Wise became a brigadier in the 
confederate service, and the others, if 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



219 



they did not enter the confederate army, 
were active in confederate councils. 
Marshall's real sympathies were with the 
South, but his habits had become so bad 
that he lost character, became a wanderer 
without a fixed home, opened a law of- 
fice in Chicago, failed to get business and 
soon after died in poverty. 

Haverhill Petition a Fraud. 

It has been stated on what is claimed 
to have been reliable authority that sub- 
sequent investigation showed that none 
of the names on the Haverhill petition 
were known to its people. The infer- 
ence of course was that the whole thing 
was but a scheme of some one to entrap 
Adams and thus furnish some sort of a 
pretext to hold him up to public censure. 
This may or may not be true, but, what- 
ever else may be said of Marshall, Wise 
and their confreres, they were none of 
them the men either to resort to or sanc- 
tion so despicable a trick upon a fellow- 
member, however much they might dis- 
like him. 

The duel between Graves and Cilley, 
to which Mr. Adams refeifred in his ex- 
coriation of Wise, has been recalled by 
the honors recently paid to Gen. George 
W. Jones of Dubuque, by the state au- 
thorities of Iowa, on the occasion of the 
90th anniversary of his birth. Jones at 
the time of the duel was a delegate in 
congress from the territory of Wiscon- 
sin, and was the second of Cilley, as Wise 
was the second of Graves. The duel and 
its fatal result created a degree of feel- 
ing throughout the union, and especially 
in the North, second only to that which 
arose when Hamilton fell by the hand of 
Burr. The circumstances that led to the 
duel briefly are these : 

How the Duel Came About. 

Gen. Cilley was a democratic member 
of congress from Maine. He was a man 
of high character, of pleasant manner 
and very popular not only in his own 
state but with all parties in Washington. 
At the extra session of 1837 in the course 
of debate on the subtreasury bill, a meas- 
ure proposed by Van Buren and advo- 
cated by the democrats, Cilley referred 
to the Bank of the United States as an 
institution which had, by subsidies to 
members of congress and bribes made to 
newspapers, sought a renewal of its 
charter over the veto of Jackson in 1832. 



James Watson Webb was the editor of 
the New Courier and Enquirer, a paper 
of more than ordinary influence in its 
day. He had supported the administra- 
tion of Jackson, but during Jackson's 
fight with the Bank of the United States 
Webb's paper came out in support of the 
bank. After the charter of the bank had 
expired there was found among its assets 
Webb's note to it for more than $50,000. 
This was soon published and it was fre- 
quently charged that the advance of this 
large amount of money by the bank was 
the consideration it paid for the influence 
of Webb's paper. 

Refusal of Webb's Challenge. 

Cilley in his speech mentioned no 
names, yet his allusion to the bank's pur- 
chase of the influence of newspapers was 
such that many persons supposed he had 
Webb in his mind. Webb, on hearing of 
Cilley's remarks, at once hastened to 
Washington and demanded explanation. 
Cilley refused to make any explanation 
and Webb then sent a challenge to Cilley 
by the hands of William J. Graves, a 
young whig member from Kentucky. 
Cilley refused to accept the challenge, 
saying that even if he believed in dueling 
he could not accept a challenge from one 
whose character bore on it the taint that 
was believed upon that of Webb. At the 
same time he said to Mr. Graves that he 
greatly regretted to find a gentleman for 
whom he had so high a respect the bearer 
of the challenge, and that in declining to 
accept it he meant no reflection whatever 
on him. Cilley was a man of personal 
bravery, sprung from old revolutionary 
stock and was on principle opposed to 
dueling and this was known to Graves. 
A few days passed and persons friendly 
to Cilley thought there would be no trou- 
ble, but the appearance of Wise witli a 
hostile message from Graves put an end 
to all such hopes. 

Cilley Shot Dead by Graves. 

Dueling was then common in Wash- 
ington. To refuse a challenge was, in all 
likelihood, to be posted as a coward. The 
influence of the man would, at least, be 
greatly impaired. He would be pointed 
at as one who could wantonly do wrong 
to another and then refuse satisfaction. 
Me would subject himself to insult in the 
house and out of the house, and to a cer- 
tain extent make himself a social outcast. 



220 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



These circumstances weighed upon Cilley 
and, against his own convictions, he felt 
himself constrained to accept. Rifles 
were selected. After the first fire, which 
was harmless, an effort was made to con- 
ciliate the principals, but Graves insisted 
on a second fire, when Cilley fell, mor- 
tally wounded. He died in two hours. 

The fatal termination of the duel sent 
a shock through Washington, and even 
in the capitol, while congress was in ses- 
sion, men spoke of it in whispers. Graves 
was really a man of large, generous na- 
ture, and the memory of the duel, it is 
said, haunted and embittered his life to 
his last moments. 

Wise Charged Clay with the Duel. 

Wrought up by the scorching manner 
in which he was held up by Adams for 
the part he had taken in the Graves- 
Cilley duel. Wise, a day or two after 
Adams had spoken, rose in the house and 
said that the responsibility for this duel 
must rest where it properly belonged. 
Both Graves and himself were anxious 
to avoid sending a hostile message if such 
a thing could be done without impugn- 
ing their own honor. Cilley had never 
given to either of them any offense, and 
in declining to receive from_ Graves the 
challenge sent by Webb, Cilley had ex- 
pressly disclaimed any reflection upon 
Mr. Graves. They referred the matter 
to Clay, who told them that under the 
circumstances Graves was bound to stand 
in the place of Webb and send a chal- 
lenge to Cilley. 

"If you don't do this," said Clay to 
Graves, "you need never again show 
your face in Kentucky." 

There were some curious as well as 
sad things in those -days of dueling. Gen. 
George Dromgoole of Virginia, was a 
very able man. In a political contest he 
was drawn into a duel and killed his 
man. The dead man left a large family 
and but little if any real estate after his 
debts had been paid. Dromgoole took 
the widow and orphans under his charge 
and provided for them as tenderly as he 
would for his own. He served in con- 
gress many years and was a member at 
the time of the Cilley-Graves duel. 
Another Notable Duel Fought. 

Francis Scott Key, the author of "The 
Star Spangled Banner," lived near 
Washington. He was a man of deep 
piety and peaceful nature. One of his 



sons was a midshipman in the navy. He 
and another midshipman named Sher- 
burne, had a dispute about some trifling 
matter. A challenge passed and the par- 
ties met at early dawn in a field near 
Washington, and young Key was killed. 
The family at home had just sat down to 
breakfast and Mr. Key had just said 
grace, when a knock was heard at the 
front door. The colored servant who an- 
swered the knock, on opening the door, 
gave a wild shriek. Mr. Key rushed to 
the door and there before him lay the 
bloody remains of his son, who the night 
before was the picture of youthful 
health. 

Public sentiment aroused itself in such 
strong and unmistakable language after 
the Graves and Cilley duel, as to check, 
in some measure, this vicious and inex- 
cusable practice, although the advocates 
of dueling claimed that its effect was to 
keep men on their good behavior and 
within the bounds of decency. 

Adams was an inveterate foe to duel- 
ing and denounced it on all occasions. 
Once when he was speaking against it he 
was interrupted by William Johnson, a 
member from Maryland, 

Adams' Reply to Johnson. 

"What !" exclaimed Adams. "Another 
duelist whose hands are stained with 
blood?" 

After Adams had concluded Johnson 
went over to him and said : 

"Mr. Adams,. if you had been born and 
raised in the South we all believe that, 
with your fiery courage, quick sense of 
honor and readiness, to resent personal 
indignity, you would be. as prompt as any 
of us to demand personal satisfaction if 
insult were offered you." 

"Then," answered Adams, "I am 
thankful that I was not born and raised 
in a community which disgraces civiliza- 
tion by so barbarous a code." 

Adams' punctilious, observance of 
every duty, however small, his unswerv- 
ing adherence to what he believed to be 
right and the great moral grandeur of his 
character became more and more appar- 
ent every day of his long service in the 
house, lie was stricken by death within 
the walls of the capitol at the post of 
duty he had so long and so faithfully 
guarded, full of years as he had been full 
of honors. — W. F. Brannan in The Chi- 
cckjo Record. 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



221 



That which is often asked of God is 
not so much his will and way as his ap- 
proval of our way. — S. P. SMILEY, 



Were the Gospel discovered only to 
the wise they would look upon it rather 
as a discovery made by the optics of 
their own reason. And if God did be- 
stow His grace, only upon men of un- 
spotted conversations they would rather 
think it a debt God stood obliged to pay 
them than a free act of grace. As God 
reveals knowledge to the simplest, so He 
does manifest grace to the sinfulest. Such 
great sinners receive all from God, and 
so have more reason to hang down their 
heads ; others may sometimes cast many 
a loving look to their own righteousness, 
and, like Nebuchadnezzar, glory and 
boast of their good acts. 

— Stephen Charnock, B. D. 



Most of our readers will no doubt 
recall the old nursery rhyme which runs : 
"There was an old woman 

Who lived in a shoe ; 
She had so many children : 

She didn't know what to do." 
Well, here's a new version of it, sub- 
mitted to the Fortnightly Review by Mr. 
Edmund Amandus Knoll, of Erie, Pa. : 
There was a New Woman 

With poodle dogs two ; 
She hadn't any children : 

She knew what to do. 



THE LATEST SOCIETY. 

The Philadelphia Public Ledger rises 
to remark that "The antitwilight sleep 
society now promises to take its place 
beside the antisuffrage societies and the 
antivaccination societies as evidence of 
the irresistible passion that seizes every 
American who evolves half a thought to 
get clubbv about it." 



Oh, my brother, resolve to rise early; 
let not flesh and blood hinder ; gain this 
point, and all will fall beneath your feet. 
— Bramwell. 



Though the Word and the Spirit do the 
main work, yet suffering so unbolts the 
door of the heart that the Word hath 
easier entrance. — Baxter, 



We deny that, in speaking of Jonah 
in the belly of the whale as history, or 
of David as the author of Psalm 1 10, 
our Lord spoke as a man of the times, 
and was mistaken. We refuse to be- 
lieve that a modern "theological expert" 
could set Him right on matters of Old 
Testament criticism, or that He had one 
single thing to learn from the scholar- 
ship and philosophy of today. We rath- 
er bless and praise Him that, being in 
the form of God, He humbled Himself, 
taking the form of a servant, and that, 
as a servant, His speech and silence were 
alike part of His perfect obedience. — 
Selected. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

Again I am permitted to address you 
from the great Metropolis of our coun- 
try. In New York the activities of mil- 
lions are centered. My visit of twice 
each year is all- too little to meet the need 
of our work in this section. Owing to 
the influenza epidemic there is not the 
usual opportunity for meetings. All pub- 
lic gatherings in many places are pro- 
hibited by the board of health. 

I found an opportunity on Long 
Island for Sabbath and spoke to those 
assembled in the Free Gospel Church, 
Corona, New York. This church has 
had a constant growth, and is ceaseless 
in its activities. My thought for this 
occasion was centered in lessons con- 
nected with the lives of Abraham and 
Lot. Special attention being called to 
the "slime pits" found in the valley, that 
appeared so beautiful. The deception of 
the lodge may well be likened unto the 
deception of those pits. Our friends 
were kind and helpful as always. We all 
felt the gravity of the situation. Minis- 
ters, doctors and undertakers are over- 
worked in their care for the sick and 
dying. The faith of Abraham should be 
emulated in the present need. The writer 
has had occasion to repeat the ninety- 
first Psalm many times of late. With 
the divine protection we shall bz able to 
accomplish our work. 

Following my last report I spent some 
time in pleasant and profitable work in 
the Valley of Virginia. Stepping from 
the train at Waynesboro, Virginia, I 
found a good brother whom I had never 



222 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



November, 1918 



seen before, who made me very welcome, 
took me to his home, and provided for 
my need without expense, or lodge grip. 
Thousands of times have I proved the 
falsity of the lodge claim that lodge con- 
nection is needed by the traveller. Lodges 
can not help the Christian whether he 
travels or stays at home ! God cares for 
His own ! God's people help those who 
appear right. 

I found doors wide open for all the 
meetings I could hold. Several meetings 
were held in Mennonite and Church of 
the Brethren houses near Waynesboro, 
and at Basic City. On September 27 I 
worked hard all day, giving four ad- 
dresses aside from teaching in the Sab- 
bath School. 

It was the time of apple harvest. Some 
of the orchards were a sight to behold ! 
Ladened with their fruit they looked 
like immense rosebushes as they shone in 
the glad sunshine that came over the 
mountains revealing their beauty. Tho" 
some orchards were loaded, the crop on 
the whole is short this year. It is not 
uncommon for a farmer in this section 
to have fifty or more acres in orchard. 

My next stop was Harrisonburg, Vir- 
ginia. I found Brethren of the Eastern 
Mennonite School beginning work under 
very trying circumstances, but encour- 
aged in the prospects. My address to 
the students was somewhat extended and 
well received. I was given opportunity 
to give a message to the students of the 
Bridgewater College, near at hand. This 
is a well equipped institution with a large 
student body. Owing largely to the war 
call there were at least twice as many 
young ladies as young gentlemen present. 
The best of attention was given. Lec- 
tures were delivered in Dayton and 
Green Mount churches of the Brethren. 
Acquaintances renewed and new ac- 
quaintances made that were helpful. 

Work in Englewood, Paterso'n, Pas- 
saic and other New Jersey points are in- 
cluded in this trip. If the Lord so wills 
I shall see Boston, Massachusetts, 
friends. The great topics before the 
people are of course the war and the pre- 
vailing sickness. . Yet other matters find 
a place. The Christian and Missionary 
Alliance has just closed another of its in- x 
teresting and helpful conventions. Some 
are drawn closer to God in their afflic- 



tions. It is more and more manifest 
that "all things work together for good 
to those who love God." The right will 
prevail and those who contend for the 
truth shall not be without their reward. 



"LIZZIE WOODS'" LETTER. 

Dear Cynosure : 

I am still in Omaha where the dreaded 
Spanish Influenza is also raging. It is 
the pestilence sent from the Lord and the 
angel with the drawn sword is over our 
city. (1 Chron. 21:14 and 16). God 
will tell the angel to put up his sword if 
we will go to the altar. God help us to 
see that sin is the cause of all this disease 
which seeks to slay us. May God help 
all the ministers to gird themselves. (Joel 
1 :i3~i4). Yes and sanctify a fast. Truly 
this is a day of darkness and gloom. 
(Joel 2 :2.). All churches and schools are 
closed in Omaha on account of the pesti- 
lence, there being 2,000 cases reported in 
this city. 

There is a white Baptist minister here 
from Little Rock, Arkansas, and he has 
endeavored to get the ministers of this 
town together. He is blowing the trum- 
pet in Zion. (Joel 2:13-17), but the 
preachers in Omaha are asleep and will 
not heed the call. Last Sunday I heard 
this preacher from Little Rock speak at 
Crugs Park. He thought it would be 
helpful to have an open air meeting in 
the park and tried to get the various 
ministers to take part but they refused. 
Some preachers want Jesus, but do not 
want to give up their sins and many tell 
me "no one can live right in this world." 
In the basement of some churches they 
cook and eat on Sunday, while the min- 
ister is preaching the eleven o'clock ser- 
mon. A person can smell the dinner 
being cooked and just as soon as the ser- 
vice is dismissed they go down into the 
basement and begin to sell, buy and eat. 
The preacher from Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas, said they have taken God's house for 
an Eating House. This kind of doings 
comes from lodges. All the men of 
the church are lodge men, and they run 
the church on the same plan as the 
lodge. 

I am sorry that Elder W. T. Osborn 
left this city. He told the lodge men 
that their lodges were wrong. I dis- 
tributed tracts and sold "Freemasonry at 



November, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURK 



223 



a Glance" and the copies of the Cyno- 
sure. They don't say a word, just buy 
the Cynosure and "Glances" and read 
them and don't say a word. 

Those whose hearts are honest are 
saying that the churches are dead for 
some cause which is no doubt too much 
mixture with the world. Well, the seed 
is sown here now and the people have 
got to have time to make their decision. 

The white Baptist preacher from Lit- 
tle Rock asked Christians of all denomi- 
nations to testify last Sunday. A sister 
who is a visitor here from Pine Bluff, 
Arkansas, stood and said : "I have given 
up my lodge for Jesus and not only that, 
but all of my sins are taken away." I 
said, Amen, that is one that I have won 
for Jesus. It was hard for her to give 
up her idol, but I just kept God's word 
before her, and her heart was honest 
and she gave up her lodge. She tried 
to hold on to the service of the devil 
but she could not get the blessed assur- 
ance until she had given up the lodge. 
The sower soweth the Word (Mark 4: 
14). The seed is the Word of God 
(Luke 8:11). The fifteenth verse says, 
but the seed that fell "on good ground 
are they, which in an honest and good 
heart, having heard the Word, keep it 
and bring forth fruit with patience." 

I went back to the mission praying 
that God may forgive the sins of all. We 
have sinned and may God help us to con- 
fess (Dan. 9:5), and pray (Dan. 9:16- 
19). It will take that kind of confession 
and that kind of prayer to deliver us out 
of the hand of the enemy and if the 
preachers will fall on their faces and 
pray to God and live a holy life and 
teach the people to forsake all sin then 
God will deliver us. 

God rebuke the pestilence that is on us 
and also our brave boys who are fight- 
ing the enemy. God bless our President 
and give him victory. God help the min- 
isters to get out of sin and then to warn 
the people. God bless the leaders of the 
N. C. A. ; for the secret organizations of 
Satan are damning this and all other 
countries. God save America. Yours 
for Him who said, "I am the door." 

Mrs. L. W. Roberson. 



KIND WORDS FROM FRIENDS. 

Dr. A. D. Pitcher, though a great suf- 
ferer, sends $2 for the work of the X. C. 
A. and writes: "I keep right on distrib- 
uting tracts and the Christian Cyno- 
sure. I believe the "dusky Billy Sun- 
day," Mrs. Lizzie Roberson, is the kind 
of a person whom God would be 
highly delighted to have do His work- 
throughout our wicked land to-day." 



Mrs. Alice A. Miller, though getting 
along in years, having passed the three 
score and ten, and physically infirm, 
sends her renewal to the Cynosure and 
writes: "I have no intention of giving up 
my dear old Cynosure, and I tell my 
son, Ralph, to take the magazine always 
after I am gone." 



Rev. Alexander Savage and Mr. J. P. 
Phelps, and Rev. William Pinkney re- 
sponded to our request by renewing for 
two years each in advance. Thank you. 



Dr. J. Ball sends $5.00 "to help along 
the grand work of your Association, 
which is so badly needed. This awful 
evil of secrecy is destroying our Chris- 
tianity. The so-called Christian church- 
es are clinging to the lodge with such a 
loving embrace, and are blindly follow- 
ing it to their own ultimate destruction." 
Dr. Ball writes from Canada and while 
astonished at the indifference of Chris- 
tian churches to the foe that is disinte- 
grating them, yet he, like a good soldier 
of Jesus Christ is bearing his testimony 
to his own countrymen. 

Elder Phillip Beck, of Woodland, Cal- 
ifornia, sent for ten extra copies of the 
September Cynosure. Though he is 
eighty-two years of age, he puts some of 
us to shame by his constant Christian 
activities. 



He only is advancing in life whose 
heart is getting softer, whose blood 
warmer, whose brain quicker, whose 
spirit is entering into Living Peace. And 
the men who have this life in them are 
the only true lords and kings of the 
earth — they, and thev only! — John Rus- 
K I N . 



Every truth we know is a candle given 
us to work by. All knowledge is lost 
which ends in the knowing. 



Those witness best for Christ who 
sav least about themselves. 



Was Washington 
a Mason? 

By PRES. CHARLES A. BLANCHARD 

10c per copy, postpaid 



This is the best, as well as the most interesting - , contribution yet 
written on the question of Washington's relation to Freemasonry. 

ADDRESS 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. MADISON ST. CHICAGO, <LL. 



Knights of Columbus 

ILLUSTRATED 

A COMPLETE RITUAL AND HISTORY OF THE FIRST 
THREE DEGREES, INCLUDING ALL SECRET 
"WORK", FULLY ILLUSTRATED BY A FORMER 
MEMBER OF THE ORDER. 

This work gives the proper position of tach officer during the 
meetings, the proper manner of conducting the business of 
the Knights of Columbus, order of opening and closing 
of the Lodge, dress of candidates, ceremony of initiation; giving 
the signs, grips, pass words, etc. Convenient pocket size. 

Paper Covers - - - $ .75 
Cloth - 1.00 

National Christian Association 

850 W. Madison Street CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



iu A »iM » a R.,H»r«i Wh«n vou rtm»». reading thia magazine place a 1-cent stamp on this notice, hand earn* tc 

any p£2i «5kSSTin-d Mt ^Fb^ pla^d^Tttfe hand.^ our soldiers or sailors at the front. No wrapping. No 
address. A. S. BURLESON, Postmaster General. 




VOL. LI. 



CHICAGO, DECEMBER, 1918. 



Number 8 






"It waves for you and it waves for me, 
In all its splendid majesty, 
This olden, golden flag that holds 

Our hearts and faith within its folds — 
God bless* the Stars and Stripes." 

"Let it rise! Let it rise, till it meet the 
sun in his coming; let the earliest light of 
the morning gild it, and the parting day 
linger and play upon it." 






OFFICIAL ORGAN, NATIONAL CHRUTIAN AJTOCIATION 
10 CENTJ" A COPY EJTABLIJHED I66S 1.00 A YEAR 



Vol. LI, No, 8 



CHICAGO 



DECEMBER 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



WM. I. PHILLIPS 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

Managing Editor. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— -Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
^^t^ttS 6 Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 

B Wm NE . S Dh^ TTE ^ RS s o hould be addressed to 
VVttk I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 

VTa?a ? 0f? l8?9 ^ Chicago ' IU - under Act °* 



CONTENTS 



The Rights of Conscience 227 

Was Lincoln a Catholic ?— Fortnightly 

Review _ 227 

First Great Pocahontas Dies. 228 

War Work of Lutherans— New York 

Times 228 

Out of Their Own Mouths, by President 

C. A. Blanchard 229 

The Mother Lodge, poem, by Rudyard 

Kipling ; 231 

A Great Revival Coming 232 

The Proclamation of Amnesty — An Illus- 
tration 232 

President C. A. Blanchard, photograph... 233 
The Religion of the Lodge, by Rev. O. C. 

Kreinheder 233 

How Goes the Battle, by A. B. Simpson, 

from a tract published by H. C. Mills, 

Falconer, N. Y 241 

To Celebrate Jewish Magna Charta 242 

"Fatherhood of God" and "Brotherhood of 

Man," poem, by Rev. P. Kluepfel 243 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 244 

" H oW!" 250 

Incompatible With Discipline 250 



News of Our Work- 
Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 250 

Southern Agent's Report, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson 251 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 251 

A Seceder's Testimony, by Elder J. T. 

Mann 2 54 

Summons Sent to Mr. Geo. A. Larson, 

Kobe, Japan 254 

Seceded from Orangeism, by A. Wright. 255 
The Eastern Star, Rev. O. F. Engel- 

brecht 255 

Kindness Not the Key to Heaven.— Sun- 
day School Times 255 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. John F. Heemstra; 
Vice-President, Rev. J. H. B. Williams ; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. F. H. Peter- 
son ; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phil- 
lips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

M. P. F. Doermann, Thomas C. Mc- 
Knight, D. S. Warner, C. A. Blanchard, 
P. A. Kittilsby, H. A. Fischer, Jr., 
George Slager, A. H. Leaman, George 
W. Bond, J. H. Hoekstra and H. J. 
Kuiper. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

, Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St.. 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96. 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

— Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 


him: I 


spake 


openly 


to the 


world. 


and in 


secret 


have I 


said nothing. 


— Joh 


n 18:20 



The thoughtless world to majesty may bow, 
Exalt the brave, and idolize success ; 
But more to innocence their safety owe, 
Than Power or Genius e'er conspired to bless. 

Thomas Gray. 

THE RIGHTS OF CONSCIENCE. 

The realm of Conscience is the realm 
of man's exclusive relationship to God: 
the place where God and the individual 
alone stand face to face. 

In that realm, in the very nature of 
the case, each individual must decide all 
questions for himself. 

No other person can have there any 
place or any right. "Every one of us 
shall give account of himself to God.'' 
Else, there is no such thing as any Right 
of Conscience: 

And when any person has there de- 
cided any question, he is entitled to re- 
spect in thaT decision ; and such respect 
is due to the Right of Conscience. 

And such respect is due to God : for 
the Rights of Conscience involve equally 
the Rights of God. — The American Sen- 
tinel, Sept., 1918. 

When a Christian man offers himself 
as a candidate to any secret society for 
admission, he ought to ask to be shown 
the obligations that he must take, and 
the ceremonies through which he must 
pass, that he may decide for himself 
whether or not he can conscientiously 
take the obligations and submit to the 
ceremonies. "The realm of Conscience 
is the place where God and the individ- 
ual alone stand face to face." 

Masonic officials and the leaders in 
other secret societies would assure the 
candidate that there is nothing in the ob- 
ligations or ceremonies that conflict with 
one's duty to himself, his country, his 
church, or his God. But at the same 
time they would deny his request to 
know before hand what the obligations 
were which he was expected to take. 
The lodge officials would take the can- 



didate's place "in the realm of Con- 
science," but a Christian could not per- 
mit this usurpation, for everyone must 
give an account of himself to God. 



WAS LINCOLN A CATHOLIC? 

[We have previously proven that the Ma- 
sonic claim of Lincoln as a member had no 
foundation in fact. The following article 
from "The Fortnightly Review" (Vol. 25, No. 
20), October 15, 1918, explodes another myth, 
viz. : that Lincoln was a Catholic. Editor.] 

Abraham Lincoln, familiarly known 
as Abe, was born February 12, 1809, in 
Larue Co., Ky. His parents, Thomas 
and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln, had mar- 
ried in June, 1806, before a Methodist 
preacher near Springfield, Ky. 

Abe's first teacher was Zachary Riney, 
an Irish Catholic, who, in Larue Co., 
for six months, taught him reading, writ- 
ing, and arithmetic. That his son Wm. 
B. Riney, a Trappist, taught Abe Latin 
and instructed him in religion is mere 
fiction. 

In 1817, when Abe was eight years 
old, the family moved from Kentucky 
to Lincoln City, Spencer Co., Indiana. 
The following year Abe's mother died. 
She was an intelligent, devout woman, 
a strict "Bible Christian.'' Abe then 
was only nine years and seven months 
old, but his mother's dying request, "T 
want you to worship God and live as I 
taught you," forever held him to her 
religion. 

On Dec. 2, 1819, his father remar- 
ried, taking for wife a Sarah Johnston. 

Goodspeed's History of Spencer Co., 
Ind., gives the evidence of records, and 
of Abe's surviving schoolmates and 
friends of the family, that Thomas Lin- 
coln, the father of Abraham, was an 
active member of "The Pigeon Baptist 
Church," a mile south of Lincoln City : 
and that the son also attended this 
church. 

For thirteen vears the Lincoln family 



228 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



resided in Indiana, where Abe grew 
from boyhood to manhood, and in 1830 
they moved to Illinois. 

The myth that Lincoln was a Cath- 
olic originated years later, through state- 
ments made by two .priests, Fathers 
Lefebre and St. Cyr, who had served on 
the Illinois missions from 1831 and 1833, 
respectively. They declared that they 
often said Mass in the Lincoln home, 
when Abe was a boy staying with his 
parents ; that Abe was a Catholic, prayed 
the rosary, attended Mass, went to con- 
fession, and received Holy Communion. 
They also stated that Abe's father, 
Thomas Lincoln, was a Catholic. 

However, it is impossible to identify 
President Lincoln with the boy to whom 
these missionaries refer, because Abe 
did not live in Illinois during his boy- 
hood, nor was he a boy at the time of 
these priests. He was rather a full- 
grown man measuring six feet, four 
inches in his stocking-feet, and was in 
his twenty-second year on arriving in 
Illinois in 1830, — a year before Fathers 
Lefebre and St. Cyr appeared. 

Fr. Lefebre's career began with his 
ordination, July 17, 1831, when Abe 
Lincoln was working for himself among 
strangers. Fr. St. Cyr was ordained 
April 3, 1833, when Abe was twenty- 
four, and for. the first four years he had 
charge of Chicago and neighboring mis- 
sions. 

The story of these priests concerns an 
unknown Catholic boy and fails to prove 
that President Lincoln was a Catholic. 

As to Abe's stepmother, it is absurd 
to proclaim her a Catholic merely be- 
cause the mother of that Catholic boy 
was a Catholic. The two women are no 
more identical than are their husbands 
or their sons. Abe's stepmother died 
after 1861. We are not aware of any 
church record or other reliable evidence 
regarding her religious affiliation. 

The late Bishop Hogan of Kansas 
City, Mo., an immigrant of 1852, is cited 
as authority for Lincoln's Catholicity ; 
yet his records give no evidence what- 
ever to prove the fact. 

Some contend that ''Lincoln never de- 
nied his religion, but having joined some 
society condemned by the Church, nat- 
urally fell away." Well, the old unan- 
swered question, calling for a positive 



answer, still is : "When and where did 
Lincoln ever show or affirm himself a 
Catholic?" 

Recently an ' anonymous "Pioneer 
Priest" was quoted in the press as say- 
ing that Lincoln was born in the Cath- 
olic faith and was a Catholic in his 
youth. For proof he gives the boy story 
and all the foregoing authorities ( ?) , 
whose testimony for Lincoln's Cath- 
olicity is nil. 

In 1842 Lincoln was married by a 
minister to Mary Todd, a non-Catholic, 
and his children were raised Protestants, 
as might be expected of one who held 
the Bible to be the Book of Faith. In 
his estimate of the Bible he says: "But 
for this Book we would not know right 
from wrong. All those things to man 
are contained in it." 

Lincoln was a great man, but never 
a Catholic. Why make unsubstantiated 
claims that only invite denial and criti- 



cism 



(Rev.) C. J. Schwarz. 



FIRST GREAT POCAHONTAS DIES. 

Mrs. Louis Provin, of Westfield, 
Mass,, who died in September, at the 
age of 74 had been the First Great Poca- 
hontas of the State Degree of Pocahon- 
tas, auxiliary to the Improved Order of 
Red Men, as well as the Past Great 
Chief of the state organization of Pyth- 
ian Sisters. 



WAR WORK OF LUTHERANS. 

At the annual meeting of the National 
Lutheran Commission for Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Welfare, held at the Hotel As- 
tor, E. F. Eilert, the treasurer, reported 
that subscriptions for the work of the 
organization had reached $i,375>54<>- 
Statistics showed that eighty-one Luth- 
eran chaplains had been assigned to the 
army and navy, twenty-five of whom are 
in France, while civilian chaplains and 
camp pastors numbered 136. The Luth- 
eran Brotherhood has eight buildings in 
army training camps, and in one of these 
1,600 Lutheran soldiers received Holy 
Communion in a single day. 

Dr. Robert E. Speer and Professor 
William Adam Brown, chairman and 
executive secretary, respectively, of the 
General Wartime Committee of the 
Churches, addressed the conference, 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



229 



Dr. H. A. Weller of Philadelphia re- 
ported on church work to be done in 
war-time industrial centers, and it was 
decided to co-operate with the joint com- 
mittee representing all churches in this 
work. Dr. Knuebel was re-elected presi- 
dent, the other officers for the ensuing 
year being: Vice president, Professor C. 
M. Jacobs ; treasurer, E. F. Eilert, and 
secretary, Reverend Otto Mees. — New 
York Times, Oct. 17, 191 8. 



OUT OF THEIR OWN MOUTHS. 

PRESIDENT BLANCHARD, WHEATON 
COLLEGE. 

One of the first books which I studied 
when I began my work against the lodges 
was the "Mystic Tie," a book of studies 
about Freemasonry, selected and edited 
by Albert G. Mackey, a southern Grand 
Inspector General of the thirty-third 
and last degree of Scottish Masonry for 
the Southern Jurisdiction of the U. S. A. 

This book, had it been written by an 
enemy of the lodge, I am satisfied would 
have been considered a coarse slander on 
the lodge. It indicated that Free Ma- 
sonry united in close and fraternal fel- 
lowship the best sort of men with the 
vilest sort of men, savages, pirates, lib- 
ertines — all were represented in its vari- 
ous tales as members of the Masonic 
lodge in good and regular standing. One 
would have supposed that Free Masons 
would have been unwilling to circulate 
such reports, even if they were true, that 
they would have left them to the enemies 
of the order, but this book written by 
an eminent Mason, printed in a Masonic 
publishing house, and sold by Free Ma- 
sons for the good of the order, repre- 
sented Masonry to be such a brother- 
hood as I have briefly indicated. It has 
been about forty years since I purchased 
and studied this book. It has sometimes 
been a question whether lodge men have 
learned wisdom by their experience and 
would now seek to conceal the fact that 
Freemasonry unites worthy and un- 
worthy men in such an unequal fellow- 
ship. 

I have, however, just been furnished 
with a book by our secretary, brother 
Phillips, which indicates that the char- 
acter of the order is always the same 
and that the members of the order are 
still blind to the implications of the Ma- 



sonic incidents which they relate. This 
book is entitled "Low Twelve." Under- 
neath the title there is a picture of a 
Union and a Confederate officer; the 
picture itself is a hint as to what is to 
follow. One would naturally expect 
from the picture put here a story about 
some Union soldier who was a Masonic 
brother of some rebel soldier, and that, 
while each was sworn to serve the army 
of which he was a part, secretly they 
were corresponding as brethren, and, of 
course, such transactions would result 
in lengthening the war, and in increasing 
the slaughter and the weight of taxation 
which would naturally follow ; this would 
be the effect upon the nations involved, 
the result for the individual would be 
equally disastrous, if less conspicuous. 
Assuming that the Confederate was an 
honest man and that he took his oath 
to support the Confederacy with a clear 
conscience, it was, of course, binding 
upon him ; the Union soldier w r as under 
the same obligation to be true to his 
oath to the northern army. As soon as 
the Unionist was willing to secretly cor- 
respond and co-operate with the Con- 
federate he was an incipient traitor and 
in like, manner the Confederate was 
ready to violate his oath. Each of them, 
in other words, was trained by the lodge 
to perjure himself to the Government 
which he recognized as legitimate. When 
one reflects that the order does not pro- 
duce this result on one or two men, but 
on large groups of men, hundreds and 
thousands of them, he sees the demoral- 
izing effect which the organization must 
make upon the minds of men. Just as 
we are compelled, when discussing the 
relation of lodges to the courts, to recog- 
nize the fact that some men will be true 
to their civil oath and some men will 
violate it, just so here we understand 
that certain persons will abide by the 
military oath which they have taken, 
while, notwithstanding, other men un- 
der the same circumstances will abide 
by the lodge oath and become traitors 
to the state. 

Not Men But Institutions. 
As we have so often said, we do not, 
if we understand ourselves in a discus- 
sion of this kind, busy ourselves with in- 
dividuals, for we can never know what 
any single individual will do until he has 



230 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



been tested. We do, however, know 
that some persons will act in one way 
and others in an opposite manner, that 
is, we can never determine the character 
of the lodge oath by the actions of men 
who have assumed it, but we can easily 
see that the secret oath taken by large 
numbers of men, which is in conflict with 
their duties to the state, must work a 
national demoralization and pave the 
road for national disaster. This book of 
Masonic stories entitled, "Low Twelve," 
continues the teaching which we had in 
the "Mystic Tie" ; I do not think it is 
quite so offensive. The brotherly rela- 
tionship, which is perhaps most insisted 
upon in this book, is the.one existing be- 
tween civilized and savage Free Masons. 
Among the rest, Geronimo is the hero of 
one of the tales. This story of his 
bloody warfare upon the whites and the 
efforts which were made to capture him 
involve the Masonic obligation. Some 
men who were hunting the Indians were 
in secret Masonic correspondence with 
others who were connected with them. 
From time to time some man on one 
side or the other was killed, and while 
the struggle went on, the Masonic order 
which was secretly operating was gain- 
ing in the minds of those who were will- 
ing to take advantages which can be se- 
cured in this way. Of course, the theory 
is perfectly clear, independent of the il- 
lustrations. It is interesting to observe 
that these Masonic stories show that the 
natural effect of a lodge oath is the actual 
effect, that the person who unites with 
a secret society involving good men and 
bad men, murderers and thieves along 
with honest and benevolent persons, 
must expect to be unfortunately affected 
by the relationship. I have not read 
"Low Twelve" throughout, but so far 
as I have been able to become acquainted 
with it I have not found any cases in 
which reputable women were threatened 
with injury by Masonic libertines, as 
was the case in the "Mystic Tie." It 
is my impression that the nauseating 
stories of that kind which Mr. Mackey 
repeats have educated lodge men, so that 
they do not think it wise to continue and 
enlarge the list of such narratives. I 
have repeatedly conversed with lodge 
men of high and low degree respecting 
the obligation to observe the honor of 



a Master Mason's wife, mother, sister, 
or daughter; I have never known one 
of these reputable lodge men who justi- 
fied that obligation, without exception 
they have said that the obligation to a 
partial purity was an impertinence, that, 
if any obligation of that kind at all were 
to be imposed, it ought to be an obliga- 
tion to universal respect for women. I 
am inclined to think that this fact is the 
reason why, in this particular collection, 
narratives of that kind are omitted, but 
while the narratives are omitted the ob- 
ligation remains and its influence upon 
the lives of men continues. A man who 
swears to partial purity, a partial hon- 
esty, or a partial benevolence is cor- 
rupted by the obligation itself, irrespec- 
tive of his actions in pursuance of it. 
For a man to swear that he will not steal 
from a lodge man, that he will not be 
unclean in life with the relatives of lodge 
men, that he will be benevolent and help- 
ful toward lodge men, while it -may not 
make him a base and ignoble person, 
tends in that direction so far as it has 
any influence at all. There is reason to 
fear that many men have been corrupted 
simply by the obligation to which we re- 
fer. I remember to have heard a friend 
say that he had never in his life, so far as 
he knew, been strongly tempted to un- 
clean living until in his lodge this ob- 
ligation was imposed. He personally 
told me that his first thought, when he 
had assumed it, was that if he should 
become an unclean man the lodge breth- 
ren would stand by, aid and assist him 
from penalty for his misdeeds. That 
this would not in every case be true is 
undoubted, that in many cases it would 
be fatal is unquestionable. The safe 
road for a man is to keep himself out of 
temptations of this kind ; publicity is a 
great guard against temptation to sin. 
This is now a commonplace, it has been 
so often insisted upon in connection with 
civic corruption, but that it is just as 
true respecting the personal lives and 
relations of men is self-evident. 
The Murder of Morgan. 
All students of the lodge movement 
know that the order is skillful in cloak- 
ing the crimes of its members. That 
there have been many lodge men mur- 
dered in pursuance of their obligations 
and penalties cannot be doubted by any 



sm 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



231 



one who has studied the history of the 
order. The most notable case of this 
kind is that of Win. Morgan who was 
murdered in 1826 near Fort Niagara, 
N. Y. He was abducted, imprisoned 
through abuse of legal warrants, car- 
ried for more than one hundred miles 
through a thickly settled portion of New 
York state, imprisoned for three days 
in the old U. S. Fort Niagara, and then 
drowned at midnight in the waters of 
the Niagara River. 

Many persons were arrested and tried 
in connection with this series of crimes. 
The state of New York obtained one of 
its ablest attorneys as special prosecutor 
to bring the abductors and murderers to 
justice. The attempt was an utter 
failure. Men of the highest standing in 
the community swore that they could not 
give testimony without incriminating 
themselves or refused to answer and suf- 
fered imprisonment for contempt of 
court. Hon. John C. Spencer of the spe- 
cial council finally made his report, in 
which he said that it was impossible to 
bring the guilty parties to justice because 
of the obstacles which were placed in his 
way. The story of this series of crimes 
in "Low Twelve" is quite common in 
Masonic circles, there is an attempt to 
cast doubt upon all the essential tacts : 
probably Morgan was never murdered 
at all ; he was very likely carried over 
into Canada, supplied with money and 
set free. Just as in the case of Dr. 
Cronin, who was murdered and placed 
in a catch basin in the city of Chicago, 
reports being circulated that he had dis- 
appeared because of crimes, etc., so the 
effect of this Masonic report of the 
Morgan murder on persons, who believe 
it to be true, will be to produce the con- 
viction that he was not murdered by the 
lodge at all. This the orders have 
trained men to do, and the natural heart 
of man lends itself readily to such false 
iniquitous proceedings. 

Shall We Read or Shall We Not 
Read? 

The question finally suggests itself 
whether it is worth while for the ordi- 
nary child of God who has plenty to do, 
more than he can well do, to occupy him- 
self with books of this kind. I am sat- 
isfied that for the ordinary man it is a 
mistake so to do. He will learn some- 



thing all the time, but there will be so 
much falsehood and error mixed with the 
truth, that, on the whole, it will be an 
unprofitable experience. There are 
books which we know contain essential 
truth — the Bible is quite sufficient for 
any man who wishes to know and do 
the things which will please God, yet it 
is well to know what the advocates of 
organizations such as Freemasonry say 
for themselves. I have spent hours, 
days, weeks, possibly months in follow- 
ing the trail of these lodge advocates. 
My experience has convinced me that, if 
there were no other evidence at hand to 
show that these organizations were 
fundamentally evil, their own writings 
would be quite sufficient. "He that 
doeth evil hateth the light, neither com- 
eth to the light, lest his deeds should be 
reproved ; he that doeth truth cometh to 
the light that his deeds may be made 
manifest that they are of God." 



THE MOTHER LODGE. 

We quote four verses of "The Mother 
Lodge," by Rudyard Kipling, as a good ex- 
ample of the fellowship found in the Masonic 
Order. 

There was Bola Nath, accountant, 

And Saul, the Aden Jew, 
An' Din Mohammed, draughtsman, 

Of the Sursey office, too. 
There was Babu Chicekerhitty, 

An' Amir Singh, the Sikh, 
An' Castro of the fittin'-sheds, 

A Roman Catholic. 

We 'adn't good regalia, 

An' our Lodge was old an' hare, 
But we knew the Ancient Landmarks 

An' we kept 'em to a hair. 
An' lookin' on it backwards 

It often strikes me thus, 
There ain't such things as 'eathen now, 

Except, per'aps it's us. 

For monthly after Labor 

We'd all sit down an' smoke, 
(We dursn't give no banquets 

Lest a Brother's caste were broke). 
An' man on man got bukkin' 

Religion an' the rest, 
An' every man comparin' 

Of the God 'e knowed the best. 

So man on man got started 

An' not a beggar stirred 
Till mornin' waked the parrots 

An' that dam' brain-fever bird. 
We'd say *t\vas very curious 

An' we'd all go 'ome to bed 
With Mohammed, God an' Shira 

Changin' pickets in our 'ead. 



232 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



A GREAT REVIVAL COMING. 

(Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, in 
The Christian Workers' Magazine for 
November.) 

We are expecting a great revival of 
pure and undenied religion after the war. 
Satan is getting in his innings in these 
days of turmoil we have no doubt. 
Moral barriers are being beaten down 
and the claims of the gospel of Christ 
relegated to the discard. But the forces 
of truth and righteousness are pressing 
ahead also. Men and women are think- 
ing more seriously than for several dec- 
ades past. Wounds are being made that 
heaven only can heal. The vanity of the 
things that are seen is becoming only too 
apparent and the cruelty of the spirit of 
the world only too real. The heart and 
the flesh are crying out for the living 
God. 

Revivals of religion are as normal to 
the life of the true church as spring 
freshets after the winter frosts. For a 



long while we have been cold and sterile, 
but the scorching heat of unprecedented 
trial and suffering is loosening the grip 
of death, and when "Johnny comes 
marching home," we shall be surprised 
if it be not to the step of a new tune. 

In that day evangelism will be a sim- 
pler and a sweeter thing than it has 
shown itself in some of its phases of 
late years. It will not be so difficult to 
"work up" meetings then. Evangelists 
will not be compelled to rely on worldly 
methods to get crowds and to get sup- 
port. Christians will be more eager to 
do personal work, and more of them 
will have learned the difference between 
social service and salvation. Churches 
into which young converts will be re- 
ceived will no longer be refrigerators to 
congeal them, and the glory of the Lord 
will seem to flood our gates. 

Yes, we are looking for a great re- 
vival of religion when we beat the enemy 
to his knees. God hasten the day. 



•Hew^woundeutor d f r 

lesions ,he^ dt helPf D 
I our iniquities- u Equity 



Of US6lir( IS * 



,iAh* 3 



THEREFORE- 
letthewickedfors&kew 'J 

*nd the unrighteous £% tm 



~«iu iiic ujii ig" 

thoughts: &nd 



J have mercy upon hm™ 1 
/toourGodJorheWiU „i 

/ abundantly p^d ^ 



Qoi tfii\ righteously prober 
mercy to 5in$ul ir\ei\. 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



233 




THE RELIGION OF THE LODGE. 



CHARLES ALBERT BLANCHARD, 
PRESIDENT WHEATON COLLEGE. 

The anniversary of President Blan- 
chard's seventieth birthday was on No- 
vember 8, 1918. 

The years of his unflinching fidelity to 
the cause of the National Christian As- 
sociation is coequal with its existence. 
There is probably no one living today 
to whom this Association owes as great 
a debt for long and unselfish service. We 
suggest that our readers, who have re- 
ceived help and encouragement from his 
letters in the Cynosure in the years past, 
send him a New Year's greeting to his 
address, Wheaton, 111. 



The Cynosure family sends its heart- 
iest congratulations to Rev. and Mrs. F. 
J. Davidson, who announce the birth of 
a son, William Gabriel. We have good 
reason to expect that in the years to 
come this little "man of God" will be a 
strong Christian character — one not 
afraid to stand alone for the ruth if 
the times and necessity shall demand it. 
Knowing the character of his father and 
mother, our expectations are well 
founded. 



rev. o. c. kreiniieder, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Blessed is the man that walketh not in the 
counsel of the ungodly, nor stancleth in the 
way of sinners, not sitteth in the seat of the 
scornful. But his delight is in the law of the 
Lord; and in His law doth he meditate day 
and night.— Ps. I, 1-2. 

It is, of course, impossible at this time 
to discuss every lodge by itself ; nor is 
this at all necessary, since the principles 
governing them are much the same in 
all, all of them being patterned more or 
less after that lodge which is mother of 
them all, namely, Free Masonry. In 
Free Masonry the principles of lodgism 
are most fully developed ; in a greater 
or less degree, however, these principles 
are found in all secret fraternities, their 
rituals being modeled more or less after 
the rituals of Masonry. The organiza- 
tions that we have in mind in this discus- 
sion are such orders as the Masons, Odd 
Fellows, Foresters, Knights of Pythias, 
Woodmen, Maccabees, Royal Arcanum, 
Royal Neighbors, and similar institu- 
tions. 

Now the attitude of the orthodox 
Lutheran Church towards these organ- 
izations is this : that membership in them 
is inconsistent and incompatible with 
membership in the Christian Church be- 
cause some of the principles of these or- 
ganizations are un-Christian and anti- 
Christian, principles, therefore, to which 
a Christian cannot subscribe, and which 
he cannot aid in promulgating as he does 
by belonging to these organizations. 
One of the paragraphs under the article 
of membership in the constitution of our 
congregation accordingly declares, that 
"no one can become or remain a mem- 
ber of this church who is a member of a 
secret society." Now, to take up all the 
objections raised by our church against 
the principles of lodgism would take 
more time than we have at our disposal 
at present, and I shall, therefore, direct 
your attention to one objection, and that 
the chief one, namely, "to the religion of 
the lodge," which is a religion that is 
godless because it is Christless, a re- 
ligion that is un-Christian and anti- 
Christian, a religion that no true Chris- 
tian can knowingly, consistently support 
and help to foster and promulgate, be- 



234 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



cause of its direct antagonism to the re- 
ligion of the Christian Church. 

But, Have These Orders a Religion? 
Are they really religious institutions? 
Do they teach religious precepts and 
principles? To answer these questions, 
we can do no better than quote from 
some of the standard works and offi- 
cially acknowledged publications of 
these organizations. I shall not quote 
what some outsider has said or written 
about the religion of the lodge, or what 
some seceder has said about it, although 
evidence of this kind is plentiful, but I 
shall quote from authorized and offi- 
cially acknowledged publications and 
rituals of these organizations, in answer 
to this question touching the religion of 
the lodge and other questions that may 
be proposed in the course of this discus- 
sion. 

Is Masonry a Religion? 
I quote from the "Encyclopedia of 
Free Masonry," compiled by Albert G. 
Mackey, a Past General Grand High 
Priest and once Secretary-General of 
the Supreme Council, 33rd degree, for 
the Southern Jurisdiction of the United 
States, a work on which he worked ten 
years, and which is the result of more 
than thirty years of study and research. 
He says : 

Masonry is a "religious institution," its 
ceremonies are "pare of a really religious wor- 
ship." Encyclopedia, p. 60. 

Masonry is, in every sense of the word, ex- 
cept one, and that its least philosophical, an 
eminently religious institution — that it is in- 
debted solely to the religious element which 
it contains for its origin and for its continued 
existence, and that without this religious ele- 
ment it would scarcely be worthy of cultiva- 
tion by the wise and good. Encyclopedia, p. 
640. 

Inculcating religious doctrine, commanding 
religious observance, and teaching religious 
truth, and who can deny that it is eminently 
a religious institution? Encyclopedia, p. 641. 

"Freemasonry is a religious institution, and 
hence its regulations inculcate the use of 
prayer as a proper tribute of gratitude to the 
beneficent Author of Life." Encylopedia, 
p. 594. 

Is Odd Fellowship a Religion? 

I quote from a work called the "New 
Odd-Fellow's Manual," by A. B. Grosh, 
P. G. of the R. W. Grand Lodge, whose 
book has been dedicated "to all inquirers 
who desire to know what Odd-Fellow- 
ship really is," and which has been in- 
dorsed by the Grand Lodge of the U. S., 



and by individual members of the order 
as "complete and faithful," as "the best 
book on Odd-Fellowship ever pub- 
lished," and "the standard work of the 
Order." In reply to the question 
whether Odd-Fellowship is a religious 
institution, we find these answers : 

"Religious instruction" is given, p. 39. 

"Odd-fellowship was founded on great re- 
ligious principles," p. 348. 

"We have a religious test," p. 364. 

"We use forms of worship," p. 364. 

"We frequently read valuable lessons from 
that sacred volume" — (the Bible) ; p. 364. 

"We draw from it our moral code and the 
peculiar instruction which unfolds our obliga- 
tions to God and our brother-man," p. 364. 

"So far we are a religious body, and have 
a religious faith for the basis of our fellow- 
ship and to unite us in religious duty," p. 364, 

"No Lodge or Encampment can be legally 
opened without the presence of a Bible," p. 
364. 

They have prayers, p. 368-371. 

They have altars, chaplains, high-priests, 
rituals, order of worship, funeral ceremonies. 

All this is more than enough to prove 
that Odd-Fellowship is a religious insti- 
tution. 

Other Organizations 
like the Foresters, Knights of Pythias, 
Woodmen, are similarly religious, be- 
cause they are all patterned more or less 
after Masonry, and have their altars, 
chaplains, rituals, prayers, funeral cere- 
monies, religious memorial services and 
the like. But what is the religion, we 
ask, which these organizations teach and 
promulgate? Is it the religion of Jesus 
Christ and the Christian Church? Is it 
the revealed religion of God's Word? 
That it is not, and that's the trouble. It 
is a religion that is Christless and there- 
fore, un-Christian, a fact which I ask 
you to accept not on my word, but on 
the authority of the men whom I have 
quoted, and who ought to know whereof 
they speak. 

Is the Religion of Free Masonry the Chris- 
tian Religion? 
I again quote from Mackey: 
Freemasonry is not Christianity, nor a sub- 
stitute for it. It does not meddle with sec- 
tarian creeds or doctrines, but teaches funda- 
mental religious truth. Encyclopedia, p. 641. 
Hutchinson and Oliver have, I am con- 
strained to believe, fallen into a great error 
in calling the Master Mason's degree a Chris- 
tion institution. ... If Masonry were 
simply a Christian institution, the. Tew and 
the Moslem, the Braham and the Buddhist, 
could not conscientiously partake of its illu- 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



235 



mination. But its universality is its boast. In 
its language citizens of every nation may con- 
verse; at its altar men of all religions may 
kneel ; to its creed disciples of every faith 
may subscribe. Encyclopedia, p. 162. 

The religion of Masonry is not sectarian. 
It admits men of every creed within its hos- 
pitable bosom. Encyclopedia, p. 641, 

It is not Judaism, though there is nothing 
in it to offend a Jew; it is not Christianity, 
but there is nothing in it repugnant to the 
faith of a Christian. Encyclopedia, p. 641. 

. . . Its religion is that general one of 
nature. Encyclopedia, p. 641. 

The religion of Nature, not the relig- 
ion of Revelation ! God's word then is 
ignored. The Savior and the salvation 
which He won for men by His suffering 
and death, are ruthlessly set aside. The 
religion of Masonry is the religion of 
Nature — not the religion of the Bible ! 
Is the Religion of Odd-Fellowship the 
Christian Religion? 
I quote from Grosh, page 372 : "Odd Fel- 
lows, being of all denominations, and some 
of them of no denomination, it would be ab- 
surd to suppose that they or any of them 
would require an initiative to give or receive 
the fellowship of the order, as Presbyterian, 
as Baptist, as Lutheran or any other church 
fellowship, or even as distinctly Christian fel- 
lowship." 

Just consider these last words: "It 
would be absurd to receive the fellow- 
ship of the Order as distinctly Christian 
fellowship." That surely is plain enough, 
the English language cannot make it any 
plainer. 

And so it is with the other organiza- 
tions. Their religion, as evident from 
their form of worship, prayers and fu- 
neral ceremonies, is not the Christian re- 
ligion, the things distinctive of Chris- 
tianity being omitted, the religion being 
that general one of Nature, to which 
every man may subscribe, be he Jew or 
Gentile, free-thinker or infidel. 

It is with this that we find fault. It 
is to this that we object. It is for this 
reason that as a Christian congregation 
we cannot sanction membership in these 
organizations : they have a religion, 
teach a religion, foster a religion, which 
is not the Christian religion. How can 
a man who professes to be a Christian 
consistently be a member of one of these 
organizations that fosters a religion in 
direct contradiction to his own? Just as 
little as I, a Christian minister, can stand 
in this pulpit and preach the gospel of 
Jesus Christ, and then join in worship at 
the shrine of Buddha with some deluded 



follower of him, just so little can a 
Christian be a member of a Christian 
congregation and at the same time be a 
member of one of these anti-Christian 
organizations. I desire this evening to 
make it plain, that the religion of these 
organizations, as stated by the author- 
ities I have quoted, is not the Christian 
religion and, therefore, call your atten- 
tion to the following features of 
The Religion of the Lodge. 

First : The lodge worships a God, 
but not the Triune God of the Bible ; 
hence its worship is in essence idolatry. 

Second: It makes use of prayer, but 
its prayers are not offered up in the 
name of Jesus Christ, and are, there- 
fore, not accepted by God. 

Third : It teaches a way of salvation, 
the way of salvation by works; there- 
fore, the way condemned by the Word 
of God. 

Fourth : It fosters a brotherhood, 
but a brotherhood of the type from 
which. God's Word warns every Chris- 
tian to hold himself aloof. 
I. 

Now the true God Whom we Chris- 
tians worship and adore is He Who has 
revealed Himself to men in the Bible: 
the Triune God, Father, Son and the 
Holy Ghost, three in person, yet one in 
essence. He is the God Who made us, 
Who redeemed us, Who sanctifies us, 
Who is over all, blest for evermore. It 
is this God, Who is the one true and 
living God, Whom all men should honor 
and adore, for the very first precept of 
His law to man is this: "Thou shalt 
have no other gods before me.'' 

Is this God of the Bible, the Triune 
God, Father, Son and Holy Ghost, the 
god who is worshipped by these secret 
organizations? Is he the god in whom 
their members profess to believe? One 
of the conditions of membership in these 
organizations is the belief in a god, who 
is variously designated as the Supreme 
Being, the Supreme Intelligence, the 
Almighty Architect of the Universe, and 
so on. But how ever variously men 
designate him, the god whom these or- 
ganizations worship and adore is not the 
one true and living God, Who has re- 
vealed Himself to us in His holy Word. 
I do not ask you to accept my word for 
this statement, but I shall quote again 



236 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



from the authorities to which I have al- 
ready referred. Who is the god of Ma- 
sonry? Here is the answer: 

This creed consists of two articles : First, 
a belief in God, the Creator of all things. 
Who is therefore recognized as the Grand 
Architect of the Universe ; and secondly, a 
belief in the eternal life, to which this pres- 
ent life is but a preparatory and probationary 
state. . ...... 

In ancient times, Masons were charged in 
every country to be of the religion of that 
country or nation, whatever it was; yet it is 
now thought to be more expedient only to 
oblige them to that religion in which all men 
agree, leaving their particular opinion to 
themselves. 

This is now considered universally as the 
recognized law on the subject. Encyclopedia 
p. 192. 

Who, we ask, is the "god of the Odd 
Fellows ? 

_ "It requires of every candidate for initia- 
tion an expresion of his faith and trust in a 
Supreme Intelligence as the Creator and Pre- 
server of the Universe," p. 362. 

This "principle" is "the cornerstone of the 
entire institution," p. 363. 

"Judaism, Christianity, Mohammedanism 
recognize the One, only living and true God," 
p. 297. 

This is false. 

There is, consequently, no mention of 
the Triune God in the creeds of these 
organizations, and the same is true of 
the minor organizations, as is evident 
from their prayers, their rituals, and 
funeral ceremonies. In these there is 
no mention of the name of our Blessed 
Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Why 
not? Because that is distinctive of 
Christianity ! They all profess to wor- 
ship a God, but a God with Christ left 
out, and such a God is an idol, for "All 
men should honor the Son, even as they 
honor the Father, he that honoreth not 
the Son, honoreth not the Father which 
has sent Him." (John, 5:23.) And 
"Whosoever denieth the Son, the same 
hath not the Father." (I. Jno., 2:23.) 
"Who is a liar but he that denieth that 
Jesus is the Christ." (I. Jno., 2:22.) 
Expressly or by implication, all of these 
organizations deny the divinity of Jesus 
Christ and thus deny the true God and 
worship an idol, no matter by what 
name they call him, an idol as much as 
was Baal, or any of the idols worshipped 
by the heathen in their ignorance. I ask 
you, can a Christian, a believer in Jesus 
Christ as the Son of God and his Savior, 
consistently take part in such idolatrous 



worship and be responsible for the ex- 
istence of such idolatrous worship as he 
is by belonging to these organizations 
that engage in it? Why, the very first 
commandment of God's laws makes it 
impossible for a Christian to be a mem- 
ber of any of these organizations. 
II. 
Secondly, these organizations make 
use of prayer, but their prayers are not 
offered up in the name of Jesus Christ 
and, therefore, find no acceptance with 
God. 

Prayer is one of the greatest privi- 
leges given us by God, but in order to 
avail ourselves of this privilege we must 
pray aright, for otherwise our prayers 
will be neither heard nor answered. To 
pray aright, however, we must pray, as 
our Lord Himself taught us, "in Jesus' 
name." "Whatsoever ye ask the Father 
in My name, He will give it to you." 
(I. Jno., 16:23.) In our own name we 
dare not ask, since we are sinners who 
are unworthy to receive the things for 
which we pray, deserving only of con- 
demnation. We must, therefore, ask in 
Jesus' name, in His name for Whose 
sake God is gracious unto us, forgives 
us our sins, and will, therefore, also 
hear and answer our prayers. "By Him 
our prayers acceptance gain, although 
with sin defiled." We are accepted only 
in the Beloved. No man can come un- 
to the Father but by Him. 

Masons, Odd Fellows, and other se- 
cretists pray, but do they pray in Jesus' 
name? Do they offer up their prayers 
in the name of Him through Whom 
alone we dare approach God ? Never ! 
The blessed name of our Lord does not 
appear in their prayers. It cannot. 
Since "at their altars men of every re- 
ligion may kneel," how dare they men- 
tion the name of Jesus Christ, the name 
distinctive of Christianity? On page 595 
of Mackey's Encyclopedia there are two 
prayers, one an opening, the other a 
closing prayer; both, of course, are 
Christless. The Jew, Mohammedan, 
Brahman, Buddhist — all these do not be- 
lieve in Christ as the Son of God and 
Savior of the world, and hence the 
Mason may not pray to Christ or in the 
name of Christ so as not to offend the 
enemies of Christ. Nor is it different 
with the prayers of the Odd Fellows. 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



237 



Grosh in his Manual contemptuously 
calls such expressions as "Holy Trin- 
ity," "Triune God," and hence also the 
name of Christ, "cant phrase," "pet 
idea," "theological shiboleth," "sectarian 
war slogan," things therefore which 
every Odd Fellow must avoid, since "we 
know no sect among us." (Page 109.) 
The same is true also with regard to the 
prayers, odes and hymns of the minor 
fraternal organizations. Intentionally, 
the blessed name of Jesus Christ, the 
sweetest name under Heaven, the name 
in which we Christians repose our whole 
hope of salvation, the name of Him 
Whom alone we can come unto God, is 
omitted from their prayers. Lest any 
member of the organization be offended 
by the use of this name, it must be omit- 
ted. I ask you, can a Christian engage 
in such Christless praying? When he 
enters the lodge hall he leaves the Savior 
behind, and, if not by word, yet by 
deed, his testimony is that of fallen 
Peter, "I do not know the man." Can 
you, my friend, as a consistent Chris- 
tian, can you thus deny your Savior? 
How can you sing on Sunday, "Jesus 
and shall it ever be, a mortal man 
ashamed of Thee, ashamed of Thee 
Whom angels praise, Whose glories 
shine through endless days," and on 
Monday night go to a meeting where 
prayers are spoken but where the 
blessed name of your Lord and Savior 
dare not pass your lips ! 
III. 

The religion of these organizations is 
un-Christian and anti-Christian also be- 
cause it teaches a way of salvation 
which God's Word plainly condemns, a 
way that can only lead men to destruc- 
tion. 

There is only one way of salvation, 
namely, by faith in Christ, the way so 
beautifully expressed in Luther's ex- 
planation to the second article of the 
Creed: "I believe that Jesus Christ, 
true God, begotten of the Father from 
eternity, also true Man, born of the Vir- 
gin Mary, is my Lord, Who has re- 
deemed me, a lost and condemned 
creature, purchased and won me from 
all sins, from death and the power of 
the devil, not with gold or silver, but 
with His holy precious blood, and His 
innocent suffering and death." "Neither 



is there salvation in any other, for there 
is none other name under Heaven given 
among men whereby we may be saved." 
(Acts, 4, 12.) The way of salvation 
which natural reason proposes cannot 
avail, for "by the deeds of the law there 
shall no flesh be justified." "By grace 
are ye saved through faith and that not 
of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not 
of works, lest any man should boast." 
(Eph., 2, 8, 9.) "He that believeth on 
the Son hath everlasting life; and he 
that believeth not the Son, shall not see 
life, but the wrath of God abideth on 
him." (Jno., 3, 36.) This doctrine of 
justification by faith, as it is called, is 
the chief doctrine of Christianity, by 
which it is distinguished from all false, 
religions, and which, therefore, it be- 
hooves Christians particularly to main- 
tain and defend. 

By express words or by implication, 
all the organizations aforementioned 
teach a way of salvation, but not the 
way of salvation by faith, but rather the 
way of salvation by works. They all 
reject Christ as the one and only Savior. 
They all ignore the salvation purchased 
by Him at the cost of His life. They 
all teach that every man is his own 
savior. Listen to what Mackay says re- 
garding the way of salvation : 

The definitions of Freemasonry, says Oli- 
ver, in his Historical Landmarks of Free- 
masonry, have been numerous ; but they all 
unite in declaring it to be a system of moral- 
ity, by the practice of which its members may 
advance their spiritual interest, and mount 
by the theological ladder from the Lodge on 
earth to the Lodge in heaven. Encyclopedia, 
p. 210. 

It inculcates the practice of virtue, but it 
supplies no scheme of redemption for sin. 
It points its disciples to the path of righteous- 
ness, but it does not claim to be "the way. the 
truth, and the life." Encyclopedia, p. 641. 

It is the object of the speculative Mason, by 
a uniform tenor of virtuous conduct, to re- 
ceive, when his allotted course of life has 
passed, the inappreciable reward, from his 
Celestial Grand Master, of "Well done, thou 
good and faithful servant," p. 451, Lexicon. 

Odd-Fellowship, likewise, teaches sal- 
vation by works, as is evident from the 
following quotation. 

"To visit the sick, relieve the distressed, 
bury the dead, and educate the orphan, is 
commanded by our laws, and these deeds are 
among our imperative duties. But, although 
they are the frequent and almost daily minis- 
trations of Odd Fellowship they constitute 
but a tithe of the intrinsic merits of our Or- 



238 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



der, and are but the rounds of that ladder by 
which it would have its votaries rise to yet 
higher planes of virtue and excellence. Its 
great aims are, to improve and elevate the 
character of man — to imbue him with broader 
and higher conceptions of his capabilities for 
good — to enlighten his mind — to enlarge the 
sphere of his affections — in brief to lead man 
to the cultivation of his true fraternal rela- 
tions, designed by the Great Author of his 
being," p. 379. 

Here are a few specimens from fu- 
neral odes to be sung at the funeral of 
a brother — mind you, Christian, Jew, 
Mohammedan or infidel ! 

"Though in the Grand Lodge above. 
We remember thee in love." p. 408. 
"And now he quits his weary train 

And marches o'er the heavenly heights. 
But we shall walk with him again, 

And share his rest and his delights." p. 408. 
"Till life shall end — then hear the voice, 
Depart in peace, from earth to heaven !" 

—p. 409. 

That the minor orders also teach this 
same doctrine of salvation by works is 
evident from their rituals, containing the 
order for the burial of the dead. At 
the burial of a member of the Wood- 
men the following is read : 

The philosopher and the scientist find all 
their calculations and wisdom futile to long 
delay the end of their earthly pilgrimage. But 
we have brighter hopes than those of a transi- 
tory nature. The only perfect book tells us 
of our mortal body, that "It is sown in cor- 
ruption ; it is raised in incorruption ; it is sown 
in dishonor ; it is raised in glory ; it is sown 
in weakness ; it is raised in power ; it is sown a 
natural body, it is raised a spiritual body ; if 
there is a natural body, there is also a spirit- 
ual body." So also it is written : The first man, 
Adam, became a living soul. The last Adam 
became a life-giving spirit. Howbeit, that is 
not first which is spiritual, but that which is 
natural, then that which is spiritual. The first 
man is of the earth, earthy ; and as is the 
heavenly, such are they also that are heaven- 
ly ; and as we have borne the image of the 
earthly, we shall also bear the image of the 
heavenly. 

These promises are sweet to us. They fill 
our heart with hopes of glad future provided 
by the great Creator for his people, where 
eternal joy will dispell the ephemeral sorrow 
of this short and troublesome existence. 

We will not pause to point out how 
these beautiful quotations from God's 
holy Word have been taken out of their 
connection, how they have been distorted 
to suit the occasion. At the burial of 
a lodge-member they are read as if they 
applied to all men alike, whether be- 
lievers in Christ or not, when as a mat- 
ter of fact they contain the glorious hope 



of Christians, and of Christians only. 
According to this excerpt from the burial 
service of the Woodmen, everyone goes 
to Heaven, whether he has been a be- 
liever in Christ or not. Of everyone 
it is said when the grave is reached, 
"We shall now leave our neighbor in 
the city of the dead. Mourn not his de- 
parture. He shall live in the eternal 
glories of his Maker." In their funeral 
ode there is this verse: "So let him 
sleep that dreamless sleep, our sorrows 
clustering round his head. Be comforted 
ye loved who weep. He lives with God, 
he is not dead." In these statements 
there is absolutely nothing about repent- 
ance from sin and faith in Christ as the 
Savior. There is nothing about faith as 
the only way to Heaven. Simply be- 
cause a man was a member of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen, no matter what his faith, 
what his life, he lives "in the eternal 
glories of his Maker, he lives with God, 
he is not dead." What shocking blas- 
phemy ! What damnable heresy ! What 
a desecration is such a use of God's 
Word ! And of all of this every man is 
guilty who belongs to'this Order, whether 
he attends its meetings or not, for he 
helps to support the Order and to per- 
petuate such blasphemy and such heresy. 
Awful is the responsibility resting upon 
every man who proclaims or helps to 
proclaim a false way of salvation, for 
the apostle says, "Though we or an angel 
from heaven preach any other gospel 
than that which we have preached unto 
you, let him be accursed." 

IV. 

Permit me briefly to refer to one more 
item that proves the anti-christian char- 
acter of the religion fostered by these 
organizations. 

Believers in Christ are God's peculiar 
people. The true brotherhood of man is 
that of faith in Jesus Christ, "For ye are 
all the children of God by faith in Christ 
Jesus." (Gal. 3 :26.) Christians who 
stand related as brethren in this brother- 
hood are admonished to avoid all re- 
ligious fellowship with such as deny 
Christ as their Savior. God's Word says, 
(II Corinthians, 6:14-18), "Be not un- 
equally yoked together with unbelievers, 
for what fellowship hath righteousness 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



239 



with unrighteousness? and what com- 
munion hath light with darkness? and 
what concord hath Christ with Belial ? or 
what part hath he that believeth with an 
infidel? and what agreement hath the 
temple of God with idols? for ye are 
the temple of the living God, as God 
hath said, 'I will dwell in them, and walk 
in them, and I will be their God and they 
shall be my people.' Wherefore come 
out from among them and be ye sepa- 
rate, saith the Lord, and touch not the 
unclean thing ; and I will receive you, 
and will be a Father unto you, and ye 
shall be my sons and daughters, saith the 
Lord Almighty." 

All secret organizations foster a 
brotherhood which is in direct opposi- 
tion to and violation of this divine in- 
junction. Jews, Mohammedans, Chris- 
tians, believers and unbelievers, all are 
regarded as brethren. They boast of it 
that there is no brotherhood closer than 
theirs. The tie that binds them is the 
tie of secrecy. The Christian who joins 
this brotherhood thereby repudiates the 
one true brotherhood, which is the 
brotherhood of a common faith in Christ, 
and by worshipping with these whom he 
thus regards as his brethren, he does that 
which is distinctly prohibited, for God 
says, ''Be not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers, but come out from 
among them and be ye separate, saith 
the Lord, and touch not the unclean 
thing." My friend, you who claim to be 
a Christian, you who say you can't see 
any wrong in belonging to the lodge, 
what have you to say about this fellow- 
shipping with unbelievers and misbeliev- 
ers ? There are in your organization men 
who make no profession to faith in 
Jesus Christ. You are their brother. 
You worship with them. You pray with 
them. God says to you, if you profess 
to be his child : "Come out and be sep- 
arate !" What have you to say to that? 
Refuse obedience to this plain command, 
and you do it at your peril, for no man 
can defy God and yet hope to be saved. 

No, my friends, the religion of the 
lodge is not the religion of the church of 
Jesus Christ. Its worship is idolatry ; 
its prayers are Christless ; it teaches a 
way of salvation that can only lead to 
hell ; it fosters a brotherhood prohibited 



by the Word of God. A Christian can't 
be a member of a lodge ; if he does so, 
he repudiates Christianity. 

If all this is true, someone will inter- 
pose, why is it that so many good men 
are members of these orders? Why is 
it that even Christian ministers belong to 
some of these organizations? Why is 
our church the only one that takes a 
stand against these organizations? In 
reply to the former questions we answer, 
that the membership of so many good 
men and even Christian ministers is due 
either to ignorance regarding the true 
nature of Christianity, or ignorance re- 
garding the true nature of the lodge, or 
to hypocrisy ; which of these it is in any 
particular case, we, of course, will not 
presume to say. As to the latter ques- 
tion, we answer that it rests upon an 
error. Our church is not the only one 
opposing secret organizations. The fol- 
lowing take the same stand as we do : 
The Swedish Lutherans, the Norwegian 
Lutherans, the Ohio-Synod Lutherans, 
the Danish Lutherans, the Iowa- Synod 
Lutherans, the United Brethren, the 
Seventh-Day Adventists, the Christian 
Reformed Church, the Primitive Bap- 
tists, the Seven-Day Baptists, the Scan- 
dinavian-Baptists, the Church of the 
Brethren, the Friends or Quakers, the 
Moravians, the Mennonites, the Plym- 
outh Brethren, the Associate Presby- 
terians, the Reformed Presbyterians, the 
Free Methodists, the Wesleyan Meth- 
odists — these all, and others, are opposed 
to secret societies, and many men, pas- 
tors, professors, statesmen, who are not 
Lutherans, have, taken the same stand 
on this question that our church takes. 
Let me quote the opinions of a few of 
them : 

Dwight L. Moody, the noted evange- 
list: 

"I do not see how any Christian, most of 
all a Christian minister, can ' go into these 
secret lodges with unbelievers." 

Geo. F. Pentecost : 

"I would do almost , anything in my power 
to help on the work of rescuing all Christian 
men from the 'grip' of Masonry and all other 
secret and un-christian societies. I believe 
that Masonry is an incalculable evil and es- 
sentially anti-Christ in its principles and in- 
fluence." 

Alexander Campbell, founder of the 
''Christian" Church : 



240 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



December, 1918 



"I know no Temperance, Odd Fellow or 
Free Mason fraternity that does not recog- 
nize a brotherhood with the world. 'They are 
of the world, they speak of the world and 
the world heareth them.' Christians, though 
in the world, are not of it. Any union, then, 
for moral purposes with the world that brings 
us to commune religiously with it, by the laws 
and usages of the institution itself, is op- 
posed to the law and kingdom of Jesus 
Christ." 

R. A. Torrey, the evangelist: 
"I do not see how an intelligent, consecrated 
Christian can belong to a secret order. It is 
an expressed disobedience to God's plain com- 
mand (II Cor. 6, 14). Furthermore, the awful 
mockery of the profane prayer in the pre- 
tended resurrection scene in the initiation 
ceremonies of the Master Mason degree must 
shock beyond measure any man of real spirit- 
uality. Some of the oaths in higher degrees 
of Masonry must be horrible beyond expres- 
sion to any man possesed of genuine Christian 
sentiment." 

Prof. J. R. W. Sloane, of the Re- 
formed Presbyterian Theological Semi- 
nary: 

"My strongest opposition to Masonry is be- 
cause of its rivalry with religion. It steps 
in before the church, and is false, an idola- 
trous religion, a religion without a Savior and, 
therefore, a delusion .and a snare to all who 
engage in it, or rest their hope upon it." 

John Quincy Adams, sixth President 
of the United States: 

"I am prepared to complete the demonstra- 
tion before God and man, that the Masonic 
'oaths, obligations and penalties cannot by any 
possibility be reconciled to the laws of mor- 
ality, of Christianity, or of the land." 

William H. Seward, Governor of New 
York, U. S. Senator, Secretary of State 
under Lincoln and also under Andrew 
Johnson, died 1872, in a speech in the 
Senate : 

"Secret societies, sir? Before I would place 
my hand between the hands of other men, in 
a secret lodge, order, class or council, and 
bending on my knee before them, enter into 
combination with them for any object, per- 
sonal or political, good or bad, I would pray 
to God that that hand and that knee might be 
paralyzed, and that I might become an object 
of pity and even the mockery of my fellow 
men. Swear, sir! I, a man, an American 
citizen, a Christian, swear to submit myself 
to the guidance and direction of other men, 
surrendering my own judgment to their judg- 
ments, and mv own conscience to their keen- 
ing! . No. No, sir. 1 know quite well the 
fallibility of my judgment and my liability to 
fall into error and temptation. But my life 
has been spent in breaking the bonds of the 
slavery of m^n. T. therefore, know too well 
the danger of confiding power to irresponsible 
hands, to make myself a willing slave." 

But why quote these and many others 



that could be quoted? The point after 
all is what does Christ, our Lord, say of 
membership in these organizations that 
deny him? He says, "He that is not 
with Me is against Me, he that gather- 
eth not with Me scattereth." (Matth. 
12:30.) He says, "Whosoever shall con- 
fess Me before men, him will I also con- 
fess before My Father, Which is in 
Heaven, but whosoever shall deny Me 
before men, him shall I also deny before 
My Feather Which is in Heaven." 
(Matth. 10:32-33.) For a Christian, 
that settles the matter. 

If perchance I am addressing any that 
have been caught in the snares of lodg- 
ism, I submit to them the question 
whether the reasons that have been ad- 
duced ought not to satisfy them regard- 
ing the un-christian character of those 
organizations, and prompt them to re- 
nounce their allegiance to them. "Come 
out and be ye separate, saith the Lord." 
You say that you have much money in- 
vested in the Order to which you be- 
long, and that for that reason you can't 
give up your membership. My friend, 
are you going to commit the Judas act 
and sell your immortal soul for a few 
pieces of silver?" "What is a man 
profieth if he gain the whole world and 
lose his soul, or what shall a man give 
in exchange for his soul?" (Matth. 
16:26.) And you who are so frequently 
asked to join this or that organization, 
I beg of you be warned not to yield to 
these solicitations. You cannot 'join 
these Orders without denying Christ, 
without giving up your faith, without 
jeopardizing your soul's salvation. Let 
your course also in this matter be gov- 
erned by God's Word. God says: 

"Blessed is the man that walketh not 
in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stand- 
eth in the way of sinners, nor sittteth in 
the seat of the scornful. But his delight 
is in the law of the Lord : and in His law 
doth me mediate day and night. He 
shall be like a tree planted by the rivers 
of waters, that bringeth forth his fruit 
in his season ; his leaf also shall not 
wither ; and whatsoever he doeth shall 
prosper. The ungodly are not so : but 
are like the chaff which the wind driv- 
eth away. Therefore, the ungodly shall 
not stand in the judgment, nor sinners in 
the congregation of the righteous. For 



December, 1918 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



241 



the Lord knoweth the way of the right- 
eous : but the way of the ungodly shall 
perish." (Psalm I.) 



HOW GOES THE BATTLE. 

BY A. B. SIMPSON. 

Pressure and the Test. 

There is a prevalent idea that the 
power of God in a human life should lift 
us above all trials and conflicts. The fact 
is, the power of God always brings a 
conflict and a struggle. One would have 
thought that on his great missionary 
journey to Rome, Paul would have been 
carried by some mighty providence above 
the power of storms and tempests and 
enemies. But, on the contrary, it was 
one long, hard tight with persecuting 
Jews, with wild tempests, with venom- 
ous vipers and all the powers of earth 
and hell, and at last he was saved, as 
it seemed, by the narrowest margin, and 
had to swim ashore at Malta on a piece 
of wreckage and barely escape a watery 
grave. 

Was that like a God of infinite power? 
Yes, just like Him. And so Paul tells 
us that when he took the Lord Jesus 
Christ as the life of his body, a severe 
conflict immediately came ; indeed, a 
conflict that never ended, a pressure that 
was persistent, but out of which he al- 
ways emerged victorious through the 
strength of Jesus Christ. 

The language in which he describes 
this is most graphic. "We are troubled 
on every side, yet not distressed ; per- 
plexed, but not in despair ; persecuted, 
but not forsaken ; cast down, but not de- 
stroyed ; always bearing about in the 
body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that 
the life also of Jesus might be mani- 
fested in our body." 

What a ceaseless, strenuous struggle ! 
It is impossible to express in English the 
forcible language of the original. There 
are five pictures in succession. In the 
first, the idea is crowding enemies press- 
ing in from every side, and yet not 
crushing him because the police of 
heaven cleared the way just wide enough 
for him to get through. The literal 
translation would be, "We are crowded 
on every side, but not crushed." 

The second picture is that of one 
whose way seems utterly closed and yet 
he has pressed through ; there is light 



enough to show him the next step. The 
revised version translates it, "perplexed 
but not unto despair." Rotherham still 
more literally renders it, "without a way, 
but not without a by-way." 

The third figure is that of an enemy 
in hot pursuit while the divine Defender 
still stands by, and he is not left alone. 
Again we adopt the fine rendering of 
Rotherham, "Pursued but not aban- 
doned." 

The fourth figure is still more vivid 
and dramatic. The enemy has over- 
taken him, has struck him, has knocked 
him down. But it is not a fatal blow ; 
he is able to rise again. It might be 
translated, "overthrown but not over- 
come." 

Once more the figure advances, and 
now it seems to be even death itself, 
"Always bearing about in the body the 
dying of the Lord Jesus." But he does 
not die, for "The life also of Jesus" now 
comes to his aid and he lives in the life 
of another until his life work is done. 

The reason so many fail in this ex- 
perience of divine healing is because they 
expect to have it all without a struggle, 
and when the c